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summer
06-22-2007, 06:42 AM
Those of you who do it, please list your routines and also how often a week is optimal to do it. Hills, sand, treadmill, stairmaster, elliptical, rowing, bike, rope whatever. Also, would a spinning class qualify as interval training? For those of you who do interval training regularly, do you typically do this after a workout, before, or separately? Those of you who use heart rate monitors, what's the target %'s etc.

chess9
06-22-2007, 07:54 AM
Spinning classes are good for cardio training, no doubt. But, if your NARROW goal is being faster on the court, and you already have good muscular endurance, then sprint intervals in the 100-400 meter range are excellent, IMHO. Also, cone work and corner to corner work on court, which is more about side to side movement, which must be good in tennis. Explosive speed is most helpful in tennis, so, do explosive workouts. But, be ready for them with plenty of base training before you start. In other words, if you can't run, say 2-3 miles non-stop at a 7-8 min. per mile pace then you probably shouldn't be doing heavy sprint work yet. I'm not saying you WILL get injured, but that you MIGHT get injured without the predicate base training.

Just my enenlightened, old man's views and as usual I'm probably wrong. I'm not dead wrong because I'm not quite dead. :)

-Robert

LuckyR
06-22-2007, 08:09 AM
Wow, 100 to 400 meters! I do (or rather did) intervals at about 15 yard sprints, then 15 jog etc. To my mind that better reflects tennis because of the dimentions of the court. More starts/stops, less cruising at speed.

chess9
06-22-2007, 12:04 PM
Wow, 100 to 400 meters! I do (or rather did) intervals at about 15 yard sprints, then 15 jog etc. To my mind that better reflects tennis because of the dimentions of the court. More starts/stops, less cruising at speed.

I don't disagree, but over-distance training confers considerable metabolic benefits. Doesn't Roddick do 10 mile runs in the hills near his Texas home? Sounds brilliant to me. For tennis, you need endurance and speed. Also, those longer runs will keep those over 25 in trim.

I've cut back my runs to one 3-4 miler per week, depending on how energetic I feel, but I also do one minute intervals on the treadmill at around a 6:30 pace one day per week. Keeps my footspeed almost at tortoise pace. :)

Just my opinion.

-Robert

Mikael
06-22-2007, 12:19 PM
There's an excellent article on TennisOne about "the power game" and how one must train to be able to play the power game. It includes interval training etc. and mentions that intervals shouldn't last more than 10-20 seconds to truly reflect the length of regular tennis points.

LuckyR
06-22-2007, 02:36 PM
I don't disagree, but over-distance training confers considerable metabolic benefits. Doesn't Roddick do 10 mile runs in the hills near his Texas home? Sounds brilliant to me. For tennis, you need endurance and speed. Also, those longer runs will keep those over 25 in trim.

I've cut back my runs to one 3-4 miler per week, depending on how energetic I feel, but I also do one minute intervals on the treadmill at around a 6:30 pace one day per week. Keeps my footspeed almost at tortoise pace. :)

Just my opinion.

-Robert

I have no problem with the idea of 3 - 10 mile runs for endurance. But for speed? As the Stanford track coach told my roommate: "Running slow helps you run slow. Running fast helps you run fast".

chess9
06-22-2007, 02:51 PM
I have no problem with the idea of 3 - 10 mile runs for endurance. But for speed? As the Stanford track coach told my roommate: "Running slow helps you run slow. Running fast helps you run fast".

Yes, but that is not exactly the whole truth, because I guarantee every Stanford runner does over-distance training. I ran track in high school and remember the three mile runs, which I hated. (400 was my specialty). I realize that George Washington was president then, but...:)

This is not just a semantic difference. Tennis players are ok doing LSD work on the roads, as long as they do sprint work as well. They are complementary IMHO. You shouldn't GO FAST until you've laid a base of GOING SLOWLY, IMHO.

These are just my views and the training methods I employed. Others may have better ideas and methods. In fact, I'm probably wrong. :)

-Robert

chess9
06-22-2007, 02:56 PM
There's an excellent article on TennisOne about "the power game" and how one must train to be able to play the power game. It includes interval training etc. and mentions that intervals shouldn't last more than 10-20 seconds to truly reflect the length of regular tennis points.

I don't think that's the best advice IF that is the way it was stated. The reason is because short intervals alone will not train a tennis player to LAST three grueling sets in the heat against a tough opponent. More is required.

By way, of example, I trained a few days with a Mexican Davis Cupper in the '60's. I rarely ran long, but he ran three miles every day like clockwork. He also did some major surges during the runs! He finished every run with a furious kick. The guy could run down a cheetah.

-Robert

order
06-23-2007, 02:42 PM
I think that doing suicides helps, though mine is over the distance of a tennis court and uphill a little. I I also only go back and forth twice. I spring 5 times take a 30 second break then go 3 or 4 times and take a 20 or 15 second break and then I go 2 or 3 times. I then take a 2 minute break and repeat this.

In terms of long distance running I think that sprints help with endurance since you are pushing yourself so much and that 2 or 3 two-mile runs per week is satisfactory.

OrangeOne
06-23-2007, 03:09 PM
Also, would a spinning class qualify as interval training?

Speaking as a card-carrying spinning instructor (yes, they really do issue spinning instructors with cards :)), it entirely depends on the class. A spin class can focus on intervals, on aerobic endurance, on muscular endurance, etc etc. Talk to your instructor - hell, if you ask them for an interval class they will probably be willing to run one for you.

All of that said: remember that the training principle of specificity applies, and if your goal is court-speed, well remember that cycling doesn't translate to running nearly as well as many would think.

then sprint intervals in the 100-400 meter range are excellent, IMHO. Also, cone work and corner to corner work on court, which is more about side to side movement, which must be good in tennis. Explosive speed is most helpful in tennis, so, do explosive workouts. But, be ready for them with plenty of base training before you start. In other words, if you can't run, say 2-3 miles non-stop at a 7-8 min. per mile pace then you probably shouldn't be doing heavy sprint work yet. I'm not saying you WILL get injured, but that you MIGHT get injured without the predicate base training.

Brilliant advice, couldn't have written better....

I also do one minute intervals on the treadmill at around a 6:30 pace one day per week. Keeps my footspeed almost at tortoise pace. :)

Why the treadmill Robert? Correlates so poorly to running! My physio hates it whenever I mention treadmills....

intervals shouldn't last more than 10-20 seconds to truly reflect the length of regular tennis points.

I don't think that's the best advice IF that is the way it was stated.

I think you guys haven't realised you're in a 'violent agreement' - in that the 100m sprints Chess proposed would be somewhere between 12 & 20 seconds for most people.... Then again, I suppose anything longer than this will be well above the 20 seconds. Not sure where I personally stand on this one.