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View Full Version : The RACQUET doesn't make a difference


JohnnySpot
07-01-2007, 10:38 PM
If the racquet DOES NOT MAKE A DIFFERENCE then Pro's should all use $10 Walmart racquets and let their skills do the talking.

Discuss.

pow
07-01-2007, 10:43 PM
but it does make a difference.
so...

chris1992
07-01-2007, 10:44 PM
ok. IMO i think rackets such as prince o3 tour or k factor or babolat aero drive are all great rackets and i dont think they improve your game but they certainly make it easier for you to improve your game.

the racket does not make the player. i see beginers using wilson k factor 90 because they see federer with it and it gives them very little chance of getting good technique.

interesting thread but i would say the more expensive rackets do help you to improve your game (as long as it is a good racket for you)

Spector
07-01-2007, 10:53 PM
The racquet definitely makes a huge difference. However if you are good at tennis then you will probably still be good playing with a range of racquets.

Adrupert
07-01-2007, 11:03 PM
Rackets make a difference, albeit overemphasized by many.

sharapovafreak
07-02-2007, 08:15 AM
i would say that the racquet makes a bit of difference like the walmart target ones vs the one that are made for players and not recreation. Other than that performance racquets are almost all the same but it takes me like 5 minutes to adjust to see how much control i need to hit with.

zapvor
07-02-2007, 08:20 AM
it does make a difference, but only up to a certain point. the better you are, the less difference it makes.

travlerajm
07-02-2007, 09:39 AM
it does make a difference, but only up to a certain point. the better you are, the less difference it makes.

I would argue that it's the other way around. The better you are, the MORE difference it makes!

BreakPoint
07-02-2007, 09:42 AM
I would argue that it's the other way around. The better you are, the MORE difference it makes!
I totally agree.

A beginner is not really going to care what racquet they are using nor does it even matter. Whereas, a pro will notice even a 1/2 lb. difference in the string tension in the mains and have it affect his play, let alone the differences in the frame.

sureshs
07-02-2007, 09:49 AM
I would argue that it's the other way around. The better you are, the MORE difference it makes!

That has to be correct. Otherwise pros would not pay big bucks for customization and stick to older racquets. They go for the lines and a little change can make the difference between in and out. It is consistent with what happens in other sports.

johnny ballgame
07-02-2007, 09:58 AM
A beginner is not really going to care what racquet they are using nor does it even matter. Whereas, a pro will notice even a 1/2 lb. difference in the string tension in the mains and have it affect his play, let alone the differences in the frame.

But a good player can adapt to the racquet. I've always thought that you can give a 4.5+ pretty much any players or tweener racquet with a 95+ inch head and the player will learn to be plenty good with it.

Luctator
07-02-2007, 10:03 AM
Of course racquets do make a difference in the sense that if Federer played with a Wal-Mart racquet he would be terrible.

They don't matter in the sense that if someone sucks, using a super leaded super customized 280gr Head Prestige that the pro's use certainly won't do any good, if not make him worse.

sureshs
07-02-2007, 10:11 AM
But a good player can adapt to the racquet. I've always thought that you can give a 4.5+ pretty much any players or tweener racquet with a 95+ inch head and the player will learn to be plenty good with it.

4.5s are not pros. Sure, Federer can play with a junior Wal Mart frame and beat quite a few players. But his concern is with Nadal and Roddick. For that, he needs every advantage he can get. An arbitrary frame will not only cause him to lose badly, but also injure him when returning a 155 mph serve.

BreakPoint
07-02-2007, 10:19 AM
But a good player can adapt to the racquet. I've always thought that you can give a 4.5+ pretty much any players or tweener racquet with a 95+ inch head and the player will learn to be plenty good with it.
"Plenty good" in the sense that they will still beat a 3.0 player, but they may have trouble with other 4.5 players if they are using a racquet unsuitable for them. That's why there's so much discussion on racquets on this board. One size does not fit all.

Rabbit
07-02-2007, 10:24 AM
It really depends on the pro. Some pros probably can't tell the difference in 5 - 10 pounds of tension. Some pros could care less about their equipment. They're just people in that respect. Early on, Mary Pierce used to get her frames done with Prince Synthetic Gut. She played with them until they broke. Then, she discovered the benefits of string and stringing and her game picked up a level. But, that is not to say that she can detect a couple of pounds difference in a string job.

Rackets do make a difference, but again I don't think they make more difference to all pros. Some pros can play with anything. Some pros can't. It's all relative to the individual.

johnny ballgame
07-02-2007, 11:57 AM
double post, please delete

johnny ballgame
07-02-2007, 11:58 AM
"Plenty good" in the sense that they will still beat a 3.0 player, but they may have trouble with other 4.5 players if they are using a racquet unsuitable for them. That's why there's so much discussion on racquets on this board. One size does not fit all.

And I'm simply saying that all the 'discussion' is somewhat of a waste of time. People like to think about this racquet or that one, this string or that one, looking for little ways to get better or gain an advantage. I'm guilty of this too. But I recognize that it's mostly meaningless. Deep down, I know I can get used to just about any old stick. So can everyone else.

dacrymn
07-02-2007, 04:51 PM
hmm that's very true. However, the impact really differs from person to person. For instance, a 1.0 - 3.5 with any racket below maybe 11 oz would be fine. from 4.0 to 5.5, it's really just preference. the racket doesn't really matter THAT much, but it's whether or not they like what they're playing with or not. Once you get to the pro level, only then is when the racket makes a difference in performance.
________
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JW10S
07-02-2007, 06:19 PM
In my view the strings are more important than the racquet. The strings, after all, are what make contact with the ball. Finding the right string and tension is the key. That's why top pros seldom switch racquets. They could play just as well with a different model or a different brand but would have to go through some experimentation to find the right string set up. They don't want to go through that, they've already found the strings and tension they like. To over-simplify it a bit the racquet just holds the strings they like. I know I change string, string tension, string gauge, etc. depending on where, when, on what, and sometimes who I'm playing. I believe the strings have a far more profound effect on a player and their game than does the frame.

rosenstar
07-02-2007, 06:33 PM
I totally agree.

A beginner is not really going to care what racquet they are using nor does it even matter. Whereas, a pro will notice even a 1/2 lb. difference in the string tension in the mains and have it affect his play, let alone the differences in the frame.

absolutley correct. I completely agree

arnz
07-02-2007, 06:38 PM
If you gave somebody a K-factored, speedported, flexpointed microgel, woofered racquet, its not gonna change the fact that they dont follow thru correctly on their shot or dont move their feet to hit their shot, nor would it change the fact that they dont use continental on their serves. Assuming somebody has the right technique, then the racquet is more of a personal preference

raiden031
07-02-2007, 06:54 PM
There are different qualities that make a good tennis player. My guess is that the development of a player's strokes would be the main quality that determines their skill level. That would include their foot movement, timing, and the way they swing the racquet. When you have two players who have developed this at the world-class level, thats when the one who has the best racquet suited for their style of play is going to win. Physical fitness is also one of those things that matters more at the higher levels of tennis. Obviously the best racquet in the world won't do much for someone who can't properly time their strokes because they haven't spent enough time practicing.

I spent the last 9 months playing with both a Prince NXG and POG mid racquet at the 3.0 level as an experiment to see if they will promote better technique. So far it seems to be true because people always comment about my technique, spin, and power, even if I lose to them in a match. Although I do mishit alot because of the smaller racquet heads (92" and 93"). A few weeks ago I pulled out an old racquet that I played with long ago, the Prince thunderstick longbody which has a head size of 115", probably weighs less than 10oz., and is 27.5" long. Just an enormous racquet. I could crush my serves like no other, but I had an extremely hard time controlling my groundstrokes. Recently I just purchased a Prince Shark mid+, which is 100" and 10.6oz. unstrung. This racquet is great because it gives me more power on my serve, without losing much control on my groundies, and I mishit less than before. So in short the racquet definitely does matter, but how much really matters on the style and skill level of the individual, as well as the amount of change in specs they are going from one racquet to another.

Ripper
07-02-2007, 07:08 PM
Oh, racquets make a difference. A small, but very noticeable one.

pow
07-02-2007, 08:05 PM
I would argue that it's the other way around. The better you are, the MORE difference it makes!

You're right, my roommate just started tennis and I've let him touch my H6, Nblade, and Redondo and he doesn't care which one he uses.

Swissv2
07-03-2007, 10:46 PM
I believe the racquet plays an important part, otherwise professional tennis players wouldn't need to have paint jobs, and wouldn't care one bit to change to the new "version".