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swedechris
07-02-2007, 02:23 AM
Hi Guys..n Gals..

Anyone Had A / Have A Disc Problem In Their Necks And Still Able To Play ?? My Regular Hitting Partner Got It And I M Going Nuts From Not Playing .. Inflammed And Worn Disc..
Any Advice How To Keep Palying Despite Some Pain Or Stiffness.. Or Is It A One Way Street To Do So?

bigfoot910
07-02-2007, 05:20 AM
The best thing you can do is find a good chiropractor. The body has the ability to heal itself if you can put it back into the proper form. I have had consistent neck and lower back problems and they have greatly diminished since I began seeing a chiropractor.

swedechris
07-02-2007, 05:28 AM
thansk for that piece o advice.. will pass it on.. seems like a good idea.. anyone else got a few tips ..? its a difficult topic but any advice is welcome!

donnygg
07-02-2007, 05:48 AM
I'd suggest he see an orthopedic instead of a chiroprator 'cos a bad chiropractor can make things worse. I had a slipped disc that went untreated for 1/2 year and was almost paralysed as it deteriorated and compressed my spinal cord. I had to have my disc removed and vertebra fused. The spinal cord damage is going to stay with me for the rest of my life. So I wouldn't recommend your friend continue playing with disc problem. Spinal problem is not something you should take lightly.

zapvor
07-02-2007, 08:14 AM
i have strained my neck sometimes from serving. what i do now is do a lot fo stretching for my neck. you can go to the bookstore and find plenty fo exercises for just the neck to increase flexbility. since i started i feel like my neck is a lot better.

spt
07-02-2007, 06:20 PM
I agree with Donny. If it is a disc problem - he needs to see an ortho, have an MRI and do some PT. It is hard for someone who has never had back problems to understand the pain he is probably having. To ask for him to play through it, is not the best. He needs to rest it (so it doesn't get worse) and get help. You need to find someone else to hit with.

Serve em Up
07-03-2007, 04:20 AM
Chris,

Nix the Chiro. Go to an Ortho, get an MRI right off the bat. I suffered an extra two weeks because my Ortho first tried to use an xray to diagnose the seriousness of my problem. The MRI instantly revealed the severity of my herniated discs. If you need surgery, have Otho refer you to a qualified Nuerosurgeon do the work. My Ortho saw the MRI, sent me to a Neoro and I was on the table 5 days later.

I had my two level cervical fusion done in August. I started playing tennis again in October. Mine was so bad my fingers in my right hand had gone completely numb. My right tricep was so paralyzed I didn't have the strength to open my car door.

The pain in my neck and shoulder were gone immediately after surgery. It took 4 mos. for the numbness in my fingers to subside, and 6 mos. for my strength to return to my tricep. I worked it our at the gym 4 days per week to get it back into shape. // I'm 44.

courtrage
07-03-2007, 09:56 AM
first thing you should do is get a book by dr. john e. sarno off amazon...i got his second and fourth books on CD and it helped me get over my low back issue completely...i've got to herniated/buldged discs and now i feel very little to any issues at all...also my achilles problem is almost totally gone...'healing back pain' is his second book and its only 3 cds more geared toward patients than his latest...i'd start with that...i listened to it in the car on the way to work for a few days...if you want to read a copy, then i might get his third book cause his latest would just be too long to get the paper version...it was 6 CDs in all...

Midlife crisis
07-03-2007, 10:16 AM
I have a bulging disc in my C5 vertebra. It flares up at the beginning of every cycling season, when I'm hunched forward but looking up. When it gets bad, I get numbness down my right arm and a pressure/discomfort sensation in my neck. During this time, I also have stiffness when serving.

I found out the severity of the problem via an MRI. It is the ONLY way to know definitively how serious the problem is. Because my disc is only bulging and not ruptured, I was told I am able to continue normal activities. If it were ruptured or if there were other types of damage, there could be significant, life-long problems from continuing to play on it without getting it fixed.

BTW, every spring when I start experiencing these problems, my doctor puts me on a ten day dose of Prednisone, which reduces the inflammation and lets me get my neck "conditioned" to the point where this is not a problem for the rest of the year.

zapvor
07-09-2007, 06:55 PM
Chris,

Nix the Chiro. Go to an Ortho, get an MRI right off the bat. I suffered an extra two weeks because my Ortho first tried to use an xray to diagnose the seriousness of my problem. The MRI instantly revealed the severity of my herniated discs. If you need surgery, have Otho refer you to a qualified Nuerosurgeon do the work. My Ortho saw the MRI, sent me to a Neoro and I was on the table 5 days later.

I had my two level cervical fusion done in August. I started playing tennis again in October. Mine was so bad my fingers in my right hand had gone completely numb. My right tricep was so paralyzed I didn't have the strength to open my car door.

The pain in my neck and shoulder were gone immediately after surgery. It took 4 mos. for the numbness in my fingers to subside, and 6 mos. for my strength to return to my tricep. I worked it our at the gym 4 days per week to get it back into shape. // I'm 44.

wow what a story. way to go!

bigfoot910
07-29-2007, 07:41 AM
Just to let you know, chiropractors are also trained to use and read MRI's. As donnyg said, a BAD chiropractor can make things worse. However, if you do your homework and find a GOOD one, they can really change your life.

I am not saying that any medical profession is better than another.

People just have to realize that there are bad doctors, dentists, orthopedists, chiropractors, and any other medical professional you can think of. Any of these can really hurt you and put a major kink into your tennis life. However, my philosophy has always been:
1. Chiropractic first
2. Drugs (NSAIDs) second
3. Surgery last. Once surgery is done, it is a permanent change in your physiology that cannot be reversed, and many times you really wish you could

Just my two cents, but hey if there is a good chance that someone can help with with my injury, a $30 office visit and subsequent treatment is worth it to me. Just be sure to find a good one.

courtrage
07-29-2007, 09:11 AM
first thing you should do is get a book by dr. john e. sarno off amazon...i got his second and fourth books on CD and it helped me get over my low back issue completely...i've got to herniated/buldged discs and now i feel very little to any issues at all...also my achilles problem is almost totally gone...'healing back pain' is his second book and its only 3 cds more geared toward patients than his latest...i'd start with that...i listened to it in the car on the way to work for a few days...if you want to read a copy, then i might get his third book cause his latest would just be too long to get the paper version...it was 6 CDs in all...

let me bring this up again, i think you should give this a look. i went to the chiro after a real bad flareup where i couldnt walk right for a week or so (i'm only 28years old) and i did the usual thing and he said i had muscle imbalances and two of my lower lumbar dics were still buldging/herniate from a car accident 4 years ago(which is what i expected was causing pain) BUT a few weeks went by and i finally got a book by dr. sarno and i feel almost ZERO issues now and i still have the same disc problems and imbalances. any issues i feel now i am sure are not caused by discs or muscles.... its worth 10$ to get the book off amazon....

welcome2petrkordaland
07-29-2007, 10:43 AM
lotta good stuff here. thanx 4 sharing, people. i'll throw in my 2 cents worth.

like others have mentioned, get it checked out first and foremost, to see if it's indeed a serious problem like a slipped or ruptured disc. if it is, cross your fingers, follow your doc's advice, and after it's fixed, get your pt done so you can get back on the court and enjoy the sport.

if it's not superserious, it's probably related to certain muscle groups being overworked to compensate for disproportionately weaker ones. for example, i've had severe pain in my trapezius (neck to back connector muscles), levitor scapulae, and rhomboids (right behind your lats and shoulders). Apparently, my major muscle groups-pecs, deltoids, bis, tris, etc. were fine, but some of the other, less prominent muscle groups were not as proportionately strong. So I was told by a physician that my disproportionately weaker rhomboids were seeking help from other muscles groups, causing a lack of balance.

so just take a bit of time and stretch & work out the various upper body muscles. w/ light weight, high repetitions workouts for various muscle groups to provide that balance. in general, exercise that targets the pecs- push-ups, bench, butterflys, etc. oppose the upper back area. so doing those exercises will support your upper back area. and abdominal (stomach) exercises will support your lower back,if you're having lower back issues.

of course the technique behind your stroke production also matters.