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Adam
07-02-2007, 01:25 PM
So yeah I was watching Wimbledon and he was doing an interview while it was raining and it came up with a bar with his career stats on. It said he had won 7 career singles titles? I thought that seemed a little odd compared to John McEnroe who had 77 and Tracy Austin who had 30, maybe it's unfair to compare to those two but with him playing before my time and him having won Wimbledon I wanted to know how good he was.

fastdunn
07-02-2007, 01:49 PM
At one time, his volley was regarded as GOAT.

jaggy
07-02-2007, 03:27 PM
His semi at the US open against Lendl was classic, a truly super saturday that day.

theace21
07-02-2007, 07:42 PM
Good serve, quick to close off volleys at the net - fun to watch.

The Gorilla
07-02-2007, 07:46 PM
similar player to mahut in lots of ways

lostinamerica
07-02-2007, 08:56 PM
At one time, his volley was regarded as GOAT.

I know everyone thought he had great volleys but I don't recall anyone saying his were superior to McEnroe's volleys or Edbergs volleys.

AndrewD
07-02-2007, 10:48 PM
Cash was a better player than his record would show or his personality would allow people to admit.

Despite having a very solid build and exceptional athleticism (his sprint times over 50 metres were in the elite category) he was very prone to injury and his career at the top level was, effectively over by 1989, at the age of 24. In those times he was healthy, he won Wimbledon, was runner-up in two Australian Opens (one on grass and one on hard court), reached the semi-final of the US Open, the quarters of the French, played the leading role in two Davis Cup wins and was twice runner-up in the Wimbledon doubles (semis of Aus and US Open doubles as well).

All up, just shy of the Edberg, Becker, McEnroe, Lendl, Connors, Wilander bracket BUT capable of beating any of them.

Actually, I think it's quite telling that, apart from McEnroe and Becker, he was good enough to beat all of those players, plus Mecir, Noah and Leconte, at either a major (French, Aus, Wimbledon, US) or the Masters. Great players, like those, might slip up at a lesser event but it takes a genuine talent to beat them when it matters most.

classic tennis
07-03-2007, 02:21 AM
He was really a great serve & volley player, just to fragile (or perhaps finely tuned) & couldnt take a knock. Also the people around him didnt help much from what I remember he had a physio that kept him in cotton wool & was no help at all........she is now employed by the LTA so watch out you Brits !

Warriorroger
07-03-2007, 02:54 AM
Cash was a better player than his record would show or his personality would allow people to admit.

Despite having a very solid build and exceptional athleticism (his sprint times over 50 metres were in the elite category) he was very prone to injury and his career at the top level was, effectively over by 1989, at the age of 24. In those times he was healthy, he won Wimbledon, was runner-up in two Australian Opens (one on grass and one on hard court), reached the semi-final of the US Open, the quarters of the French, played the leading role in two Davis Cup wins and was twice runner-up in the Wimbledon doubles (semis of Aus and US Open doubles as well).

All up, just shy of the Edberg, Becker, McEnroe, Lendl, Connors, Wilander bracket BUT capable of beating any of them.


Actually, I think it's quite telling that, apart from McEnroe and Becker, he was good enough to beat all of those players, plus Mecir, Noah and Leconte, at either a major (French, Aus, Wimbledon, US) or the Masters. Great players, like those, might slip up at a lesser event but it takes a genuine talent to beat them when it matters most.

Your opening sentence says it all. I agree with you. IMO A spectactular player to watch in those days.

Jonnyf
07-03-2007, 04:16 AM
I was watching a replay of the '87 Wimbledon final yesterday and was trully impressed by his game. I've saw him play live a few years ago (maybe 04 or 05) and from then on I've been a massive fan. I spoke to him for about a minute in December 06 and he's a really nice guy.

jaggy
07-03-2007, 05:08 AM
I know everyone thought he had great volleys but I don't recall anyone saying his were superior to McEnroe's volleys or Edbergs volleys.

Navratilova once said when her volleys were off she studied video of Cash's to help her get it back fundamentally.

krosero
07-03-2007, 07:17 AM
I know everyone thought he had great volleys but I don't recall anyone saying his were superior to McEnroe's volleys or Edbergs volleys.During the Cash-Wilander final in the AO, Cliff Drysdale said he thought that Cash had the best backhand volley in the game. At the Wimbledon that Cash won, Dick Enberg and Bud Collins said that his volleys were the best in the tournament (so that would included Edberg, who lost in the semis, but not McEnroe, who skipped Wimbledon that year).

theace21
07-03-2007, 07:43 AM
Easy to volley when you are in great position all the time and sitting right on the net. The guy was super quick, great feet.

Everyone could be a great volleyer if we were always balanced and in great position every time.

Colpo
07-03-2007, 08:00 AM
Lacked consistency and a sturdy enough body to be even close to all-time. Similar to Rafter in many ways. Cash always seemed to have to work hard to succeed. His Wimbledon win was deserved, and he came close to winning another major, too. Definitely got up for the Slams and the Davis Cup, but relatively few tourney wins for a player of his talent.

NoBadMojo
07-03-2007, 08:02 AM
Very very fast and athletic...had that old school mentality where he served and volleyed on every serve and if he kept getting passed so be it, the opponent was better that day

His weaponry was his quickness and he lacked any single big shot, but was good at all the shots. he earned his serve volley points the hard way as his serve was never one that was going to blow opponents off the court. He was from the early Edberg/Rafter school, but a bit different

Nagging injuries (as others have said) precluded him from doing better longer

ilovecarlos
07-03-2007, 08:32 AM
Loved watching him play....his volleys were top notch...his knees would practically be on the ground he could get so low. He had lot's of injuries....if memory serves me...didn't he have his appendix removed about 8 weeks prior to winning Wimby? Think they removed them from the back so as to not mess with his stomach muscles....
Had quite a rep as a bad boy...played guitar (badly) with Johnny Mac and and a fondness for ladies and beer!;)
He was and still is a cutie

Jonnyf
07-03-2007, 08:38 AM
Loved watching him play....his volleys were top notch...his knees would practically be on the ground he could get so low. He had lot's of injuries....if memory serves me...didn't he have his appendix removed about 8 weeks prior to winning Wimby? Think they removed them from the back so as to not mess with his stomach muscles....
Had quite a rep as a bad boy...played guitar (badly) with Johnny Mac and and a fondness for ladies and beer!;)
He was and still is a cutie


I'd heard he had his appendix out but I thought he missed Wimbledon the year of that op.? Didn't he have another problem just before the appendix removal.?

ilovecarlos
07-03-2007, 08:44 AM
I'd heard he had his appendix out but I thought he missed Wimbledon the year of that op.? Didn't he have another problem just before the appendix removal.?


Cloudy memory here...sorry...but pretty sure the appendix operation was just before Wimby win...think he had it in Sweden? Know he had a Swedish gf then, had a few kids with her...I think he did have another medical probelm that year too...maybe it was in Japan? Jeez, a mind is a terrible thing to lose;)
I always thought he was pretty cool tho...that whole bad boy thing...but have since been told that he was a pretty big jerk...was sorry to hear that

Jonnyf
07-03-2007, 08:52 AM
Cloudy memory here...sorry...but pretty sure the appendix operation was just before Wimby win...think he had it in Sweden? Know he had a Swedish gf then, had a few kids with her...I think he did have another medical probelm that year too...maybe it was in Japan? Jeez, a mind is a terrible thing to lose;)
I always thought he was pretty cool tho...that whole bad boy thing...but have since been told that he was a pretty big jerk...was sorry to hear that


You're probably right, All this happened a few years before I was born.! He was nice when I met him in December

ilovecarlos
07-03-2007, 02:14 PM
I read that you had met him...cool...where? I'm glad he was nice to you.

fastdunn
07-03-2007, 02:24 PM
I know everyone thought he had great volleys but I don't recall anyone saying his were superior to McEnroe's volleys or Edbergs volleys.

I know, that's why I said "one time". I clearly remember a Tennis magazine
feauture story in early 90's that listed Pat Cash as the greatest volleyer
of all time. I'm not syaing I consider his volley GOAT but I'm saying
his volley was as good as to be compared to the best in the game.

vitasGremembered
07-03-2007, 02:28 PM
His semi at the US open against Lendl was classic, a truly super saturday that day.

In that match Lendl hit the gutsiest shot I've ever seen in 35+ years, Cash was up match point and Lendl hit a perfect topspin lob. Never seen anyone else ever hit a lob on match point. I hated "robot" Lendl up to then, afterwards had nothing but admiration for his guts.

sandy mayer
07-09-2007, 03:00 PM
Cash was a very good player who under achieved due to injuries. His greatest shot was his volley, but he also had a really good serve for his era, and also hit good passing shots and lobs.

I watched several of his Wimbledon 87 matches: he played brilliantly, and was a worthy Wimbledon champ.

FarFed
07-09-2007, 10:45 PM
Incidentally, he's pretty pi**ed of with the whole tennis profession ("industry") as of now. This is an interesting article about how he was treated badly at lots of tournaments when he wanted a wild card. Lots of whining here, interesting article though.

Pat Cash - "I'm glad I'm out of this cesspit". (http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,,2104840,00.html)

aimr75
07-10-2007, 12:32 AM
i really enjoyed watching his matches.. i recall in later years, well into his retirement, he was commentating or having an interview and he said that the pressure was so great during a grand slam final that he didnt know whether he could handle going through another one.. upon reflection
________
Dodge Ev (http://www.dodge-wiki.com/wiki/Dodge_EV)

kissmyace
07-10-2007, 12:37 AM
In that match Lendl hit the gutsiest shot I've ever seen in 35+ years, Cash was up match point and Lendl hit a perfect topspin lob. Never seen anyone else ever hit a lob on match point. I hated "robot" Lendl up to then, afterwards had nothing but admiration for his guts.

Rafter against Goran, 2001, match point down, Goran served and came in, Rafter return, Goran went behind Pat on the volley and Rafter hit the sweetest backhand lob over the rather tall Croatian, rather ballsy i think!!

officerdibble
07-10-2007, 12:50 AM
I've met Pat Cash on several occasions and hit with him too. He's a strange character. He is one of the nicest people you'd ever meet in person, but when it comes to writing articles he can come across really, really, badly. I even his own autobiography (not the best of reads) made him come across as a bit of a d*ck! For example, I knew that he had an issue with Rusedski about payment for coaching, but reading HIS book (and expecting to find the emotionally awkward Canadibrit at fault) I couldn't help but feel Cash was in the wrong! In general he seems to feel that the world owes him something.

I suspect that he suffers a little from having spent so much time competing and playing tennis when he was young, and not quite enough time on other things!

Physically he's like a normal person who's been inflated several pounds all over - he is almost muscle bound - you can see it in his walk. I guess he has a sprinter's physique developed for and from the explosive style of tennis he always played.

He suffered some major injuries along the way, which were a byproduct of poor technique. When he worked with a biomechanics expert (Brad Langevad) he made the adjustments necessary, but by that stage he was past his prime.

Frank Silbermann
07-10-2007, 03:24 AM
In the years before Pat Cash was at his peak, many famous tennis teachers insisted that the (one-handed) backhand was "more natural" than the forehand and that most top players had "better" backhands than forehands. I realized what bunk this was when TV commentators pointed out how much better Cash's technique was on the backhand than on the forehand, only to hear one of them admit, "But opponents still play to his backhand because his forehand is still more effective."

It is a strange kind of "better" that means "less effective." (That's when I decided to take advantage of my ambidexterity to learn a left-handed forehand.)

TheNatural
07-11-2007, 10:26 AM
he was pretty good, but Nadal beat him when he was 14 and cash was 36..lol.

classic tennis
07-12-2007, 01:43 AM
he was pretty good, but Nadal beat him when he was 14 and cash was 36..lol.

Yep & I guess if Nadal wins Wimby you will have some credability.......

Gugafan_Redux
07-12-2007, 06:46 AM
Pat Cash - "I'm glad I'm out of this cesspit". (http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,,2104840,00.html)

Oh, my god. What a crotchety old gas bag!

"I was at the French Open and it was lots of fun talking to players, seeing old friends. Then come the women's final and the men's - and you barely recognise anybody because of all the hangers-on.They're pushing in at the restaurants in front of the junior players and seniors like me, being loud and rude. And I'm thinking, "**** me! The arseholes have come in!" These are people who have got their tickets and don't give a **** about tennis really. They've got their men's final tickets, their women's' final tickets, and they're trampling over everyone because all they care about is themselves. They're not the people we want in tennis. We want people who are passionate about the sport, who care and do their best, nice guys who try their arses off.

Azzurri
07-16-2007, 07:37 AM
At one time, his volley was regarded as GOAT.

by whom?;) Most of the commentators are talking in the moment. I would rate him maybe top 20 of alltime. Becker, rafter, Mac,Edberg, Sampras, Goran, Stich, and a whole host of others were better SV in their career. He was really good for like 2 years. I would rate him higher if he sustained his career a bit longer. Nice player to watch and entertaining.

Azzurri
07-16-2007, 07:50 AM
Read the article and have to say Cash was just being honest. You guys need to remember his words are in written form...context can be taken incorrectly. He seems to be telling us he got screwed over by rich, snobby tennis elitists. He was right to complain about his treatment at the AO. The guy didplay for his country and was a great player for Australia...I wouldbe ****ed too. The guy just gave his views on a few experiences and some people want to make him out to be a whiner....

PimpMyGame
07-16-2007, 08:05 AM
Cash was always fun to watch but joins the list of players whose peak was too short and whose success fell short of expectations.

diggler
07-16-2007, 08:31 AM
He was very athletic. Deserving Wimbledon champion. I thought Rafter and Edberg were better volleyers, but I could be wrong.

anointedone
07-16-2007, 10:12 AM
He was an extremely good volleyer, but I dont see how one says he was the best. If he was the best at his main game, he certainly would have won more then 1 slam title, considering how many Edberg for example won.

anointedone
07-16-2007, 10:28 AM
I know, that's why I said "one time". I clearly remember a Tennis magazine
feauture story in early 90's that listed Pat Cash as the greatest volleyer
of all time. I'm not syaing I consider his volley GOAT but I'm saying
his volley was as good as to be compared to the best in the game.

Tennis magazine is entertaining to read, but it hardly contains the most valid expert analysis of the game. God how many years did that major dumbass Peter Bodo work in one of the premier roles of that magazine. That alone kills the credibility of that magazine from any expertise standpoint.

Moose Malloy
07-16-2007, 12:48 PM
I think its hard to judge past players, by just our faded memories of them. Cash is one of my favorites & I've been able to watch quite a few of his matches in recent years, its hard to say anyone really had better volleys than him(maybe just make it a tie?)

To this day, I've never seen a 'stronger' volleyer than him. Many are able to hit backhand overheads well, when they have the time, but I've never seen someone hit these high backhand volleys, not quite overheads, as well as Cash. Most of the time when players have to hit this shot they barely get a racquet on it, or the best they can hope for is to angle it out of reach & get get a chance to hit an easier shot after. Not Cash, he can just jump, & with no backswing hit these high backhand volleys into the stands. talk about a strong guy(& in terms of muscle mass, I think he & Vilas are the strongest players of the last 20 years, their physiques are not common to tennis, even in this age of better training, diet, etc)
also he can make these incredible half-volleys from no-man's land like no one else(again his physical strength allows him to really stick these volleys, they are hit with pace, not just placed for the next shot)
athletically, he ranks near the top of all slam champs of the last 20 years imo.

I used to think Rafter was a better version of him, but now I'm not so sure.

and as far a big match players go, he was great, he beat #1 Lendl 3 times in slams over the course of a year, & had some incredible Davis Cup campaigns.
injuries plagued his entire career, even prior to his W win, he had some serious injuries.

its a shame the atp didn't give him many wildcards, I think its yet another factor why tennis is so youth-based, the tour does nothing to help older players.

morten
07-16-2007, 02:06 PM
Cloudy memory here...sorry...but pretty sure the appendix operation was just before Wimby win...think he had it in Sweden? Know he had a Swedish gf then, had a few kids with her...I think he did have another medical probelm that year too...maybe it was in Japan? Jeez, a mind is a terrible thing to lose;)
I always thought he was pretty cool tho...that whole bad boy thing...but have since been told that he was a pretty big jerk...was sorry to hear that

He had a Norwegian gf, not Swedish, hate it when people confuse those countries! :( I am from Norway btw ;)

BTURNER
07-29-2007, 05:51 PM
by whom?;) Most of the commentators are talking in the moment. I would rate him maybe top 20 of alltime. Becker, rafter, Mac,Edberg, Sampras, Goran, Stich, and a whole host of others were better SV in their career. He was really good for like 2 years. I would rate him higher if he sustained his career a bit longer. Nice player to watch and entertaining.

Ever heard of Laver, Rosewall, Newcomb, Budge, Crawford, Tilden, Emerson, Hoad. GOAT volleyers goes beyond 80's and 90's

krosero
07-29-2007, 06:12 PM
Neale Fraser, the great Aussie champion of the 1950s and 60s, coached Cash and had this to say:

Cash has the mental toughness of Rosewall, the quickness of Newcombe and the strength of Hoad.

(Not sure when he said that, but it was quoted during Cash's Wimbledon final).

After Cash spearheaded Australia's Davis Cup win in '86, this was reported by the NY Times:

Neale Fraser, the Australian captain, described Cash's performance as the greatest he had seen by an Australian in Davis Cup play.

Wuornos
08-08-2007, 04:37 AM
I agree with those comments from people who say his career was to short. It's difficult for someone to prove they are one of the absolute greats beyond reasonable doubt in such a short time frame.

For me sufficient eveidence was provided to currently rate him 27th best of the open era.

morten
08-08-2007, 04:56 AM
not bad not bad....

kiki
01-07-2011, 01:31 PM
Neale Fraser, the great Aussie champion of the 1950s and 60s, coached Cash and had this to say:



(Not sure when he said that, but it was quoted during Cash's Wimbledon final).

After Cash spearheaded Australia's Davis Cup win in '86, this was reported by the NY Times:

¿did he say it before or after his daily pieces of Foster Lager?.

Cash had talent the guts, the body and the legs to fare quite better than he did.I liked him a lot but, somewhat, was disapointing to many fans that wanted him to restore the "Australiam Empire" back¡¡ ( injuries, yes, but specially, self indulgence and too much taste for fun and good life).

He just had 50% of the mind and brain of a Rosewall,Laver and Newcombe.

Still, he lighted tennis in the 80´s - just the light turned off too soon-

kiki
01-07-2011, 01:37 PM
At one time, his volley was regarded as GOAT.

The best of the 80´s along Mac´s and Edberg´s but not the GOAT volley.Other aussies had a more complete volley - Roche and Sedgman, also Laver and possibly Newcombe and Rosewall-

kiki
01-07-2011, 01:41 PM
I'd heard he had his appendix out but I thought he missed Wimbledon the year of that op.? Didn't he have another problem just before the appendix removal.?

yeah, too much sex.

Now seriously, few people know that Pat´s favourite sport - even more than tennis- was Australian Rules, which is the toughest team sports that has been invented.

...and I do not recall her name, but her girlfirend was terrific looking, too.

rollingrock
02-03-2011, 10:17 AM
I remeber hearing at the time people say that Edberg had a better backhand volley, but Cash was maybe a little more complete package at net (fh/bh + overhead). I'm not sure I agree, but man could he get back for the overheads like a cat. I think that quickness allowed him to play closer to the net than most, which made him even more effective volleying.

I think it was the achilles ruptrue that really killed him. He relied so much on quickness, and that really hurt him.

morten
02-03-2011, 02:01 PM
I remeber hearing at the time people say that Edberg had a better backhand volley, but Cash was maybe a little more complete package at net (fh/bh + overhead). I'm not sure I agree, but man could he get back for the overheads like a cat. I think that quickness allowed him to play closer to the net than most, which made him even more effective volleying.

I think it was the achilles ruptrue that really killed him. He relied so much on quickness, and that really hurt him.

i agree.......

timnz
02-03-2011, 04:03 PM
The thing that Pat had was incredibly fast foot speed. If you look at his thighs you can see why - incredibly strong. Unfortunately in 1989/1990 he tore his archiles tendon and never was the same again. He was really unlucky with injuries.

Incredible Volleyer. Though ironically his serve was a little weak. Interestingly his serve now as a senior player is better (faster, stronger) than it ever was during his 'peak' years. Seems to have worked out the bio-mechanics now.

Tennis Dunce
02-04-2011, 09:53 AM
87 Aussie Final v Edberg.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3Uqk4-mlJY&feature=feedu

SusanDK
02-04-2011, 12:04 PM
Pat Cash won the Wimbledon men's over 45 doubles in 2010 with Mark Woodforde. He plays a fair amount of seniors / legends tennis these days.

retrowagen
02-04-2011, 12:32 PM
Very strong player, physically. So strong that his body worked against itself (not unlike Nadal, at the moment), as it happened.

He didn't seem quite as tough mentally as some of his peers, and his tumultuous 'rocker' lifestyle seemed to take more away from his tennis than it added...

Tennis Dunce
02-04-2011, 12:35 PM
Pat Cash is the kind of guy who could beat the crap out of two thugs in an alley.

kiki
02-04-2011, 12:44 PM
Cash was a better player than his record would show or his personality would allow people to admit.

Despite having a very solid build and exceptional athleticism (his sprint times over 50 metres were in the elite category) he was very prone to injury and his career at the top level was, effectively over by 1989, at the age of 24. In those times he was healthy, he won Wimbledon, was runner-up in two Australian Opens (one on grass and one on hard court), reached the semi-final of the US Open, the quarters of the French, played the leading role in two Davis Cup wins and was twice runner-up in the Wimbledon doubles (semis of Aus and US Open doubles as well).

All up, just shy of the Edberg, Becker, McEnroe, Lendl, Connors, Wilander bracket BUT capable of beating any of them.

Actually, I think it's quite telling that, apart from McEnroe and Becker, he was good enough to beat all of those players, plus Mecir, Noah and Leconte, at either a major (French, Aus, Wimbledon, US) or the Masters. Great players, like those, might slip up at a lesser event but it takes a genuine talent to beat them when it matters most.

Built up like a light bull - due to his training in the very competitive Australian Rules Football- cash was extremely strong and flexible, specially on his knees.That allowed him to evolve very well on grass.He was, along mc and Edberg, one of the best volleyers of his generation, and IMo, his first step was a decisive factor in his excellent net play.

Good serve, long and angled, though not exactly a cannon ball.More of a serve and volley classic player than a guy with an acing serve.He was considered the great hope of australian tennis, since John Newcombe 15 years before Australia had not had a true champion, and a Wimbledon winner.

Unfortunately, Edberg and Wilander were too tough for him in the 2 AOF he lost going to five sets and having chances to win the title.his first showing at the top was his 1983 DC win, one year after being crowned the world´s best junior.In 1984 gave Mc a scare at the W SF and quite a bigger scare to Lendl at the USO SF.

Nice and charismatic guy, passionate for Rock and Roll, however was mixed uo a little bit in the drug´s convulsed sport world of the 80´s.he was a bit cookie, but this was more an attitude learnt from the very tough Australian Rules rather than his true nature.

A potentially great doubles player, and an even better Davis Cup man.he won almost single handedly 2 DC against the very tough Swede team - both of them under aussie´s grass, however-.His injuries prevented him, IMo, to improve his GS record; he showed that, on any given day, could beat any player on a reasonably fast court.

Tennis Dunce
02-04-2011, 01:05 PM
By far the best ever shoetop volley I've ever seen...and still get punch, bite, and depth on it. Incredible. Cash to me is one of the few stalwarts from the serve and volley era who could maintain today...considering those low dippers are right in his wheelhouse.

big ted
02-04-2011, 05:25 PM
i agree he was like a shorter version of rafter. very athletic but so prone to injury... one tournament, he snapped his achilles heel coming in after a serve. its so ironic who many would call the 'fittest' or 'most athletic' speciman have many injury problems and/or eventually retire due to injuries (i.e. - cash, agassi, lendl, phillipousis, nadal, etc..) and the skinnier leaner ones dont have as many problems (federer, mcenroe, connors, borg, ...)

mfromg
02-05-2011, 05:57 PM
I read a few years ago that on the first 10 meters, Cash was faster than Carl Lewis.

BTURNER
02-05-2011, 07:03 PM
interesting. Others have mentioned his backhand volley, overhead, shoetop volley high backhand volley while I remember him as having a superb low forehand volley, LOL. It really is telling isn't it?

8F93W5
02-05-2011, 07:06 PM
Cash wrote a good autobiography.

cigrmaster
02-05-2011, 07:46 PM
He had a good couple of years but would not rate him in the top 50 all time. He was very good at the net but the rest of his game was lacking. He may be top 15 all time at the net but no where near the best of all time.

Frank Silbermann
02-05-2011, 08:22 PM
By far the best ever shoetop volley I've ever seen...and still get punch, bite, and depth on it. Incredible. Cash to me is one of the few stalwarts from the serve and volley era who could maintain today...considering those low dippers are right in his wheelhouse. Yes, I remember those lunging volleys at ankle height just inside the sidelines -- returned with perfect placement, again and again.

He was also a key trigger that convinced me to become a two-forehand player. The TV commentators said he had a flawed, wristy forehand ground stroke but perfect technique on the backhand -- adding "but for all that his opponents still go to his steadier backhand, as his forehand is still the more effective shot."

That's when I finally gave up on my desire to believe the old straw that "the backhand is the more natural shot and that's why most good players have better backhands than forehands."

Raphael
02-05-2011, 08:27 PM
I remember his very aggressive net game and his quickness which allowed him to get in for that serve and volley game. He was under-rated, but that was due in part to the era he played in and how good the top guys were, that he couldn't quite overcome for the most part.

suwanee4712
02-10-2011, 09:47 AM
Cash wrote a good autobiography.

Cash dished some dirty in his book didn't he? I remember Mac and some of the others being upset about some things he chose to put into his book. Every time I see Killer Cahill on tv I think of what Cash wrote about what they did during that Davis Cup tie in Austria. Or maybe I just need to keep my mind out of the gutter! :twisted:

I loved Cash's game. For those that watched a lot of Pat Rafter, their games were so similar. But I would've given the edge to Cash who probably had a little more flair than Rafter did. His serve was good but was made to be better by how well he backed it up with his volleys. His groundstrokes weren't so great. But they might've improved had he played more on clay. I saw him play on clay a couple of times and thought he could be good on the stuff if he really tried.

magnut
04-09-2011, 02:11 AM
Cashy had the sickest low volley ever. Best ever. Serve was ok. Groundies were not great. Everything was muscled.

Cash was the real deal. The guy was also an absolute warrior on court and even off. McEnroe and Conners would put on a tough guy act on court but were basically cry babies. Cash was brutal. Things like fights with other players off court in the locker room, bar fights etc.

Cash did not fake it to the camera or in interviews either. The modern game (ATP College) would not know what to do with him.

His career was to short and was a huge loss for the tennis of the time. I was really looking forward to him having long rivalries with some of the greats.