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dcottrill
07-06-2007, 01:31 PM
After taking a 30 year break, I have recently taken up tennis again at the age of 55. Problem is, as the years passed, I have slowly added some extra weight. So, in addition to being 30 years older, I am also 30 pounds heavier. When I was younger, it was not very difficult to shed a few pounds when I needed to. Just cut back on the calories and ramp up the workouts for a few weeks, and the pounds melted away. Much to my dismay, I have discovered that is not the case anymore. Every extra ounce hangs on like grim death. I know I have to work harder, but I have also discovered that I take longer to recover, which makes it very difficult to add any extra workouts. I am currently playing tennis four times a week - two group lessons followed by some short doubles matches orchestrated by the instructor, and two "friendly" singles matches with a buddy of mine. I am also doing a full-body weight training session twice a week followed by some cardio intervals. Still, after several months, I have lost very little weight, and I am still moving around the court like a wounded water buffalo.

Any advice on how to get out of this rut would be greatly appreciated.

Midlife crisis
07-06-2007, 07:55 PM
Any advice on how to get out of this rut would be greatly appreciated.

As you age and unless you keep yourself very active and work out pretty religiously, you lose muscle mass and put on fat. The reduced muscle mass means that you aren't able to perform athletically like you were before, and aren't able to burn as many calories either.

Unless you've been consistently athletic in the intervening years, a good program would be to start some sort of resistance training. This will rebuild some of the lost muscle mass and prepare your joints, tendons, and ligaments for the demands of tennis.

The other difference is that you now have to also pay your dues in off-the-court training. For instance, as a 20 year old, I could just play myself into tennis shape. Now, for every hour that I play, I have to spend probably 30 minutes in the weight room plus another 30 minutes doing fairly strenuous cardio work. It's the price to pay for getting wiser!

PeakXV
07-06-2007, 08:33 PM
How are yu sleeping? Sleep is imperative to gain muscle/tone .... especially as you get older. Not just 8 hours ..... but 8 quality deep sleep hours is a must.

Other than that the calories in <<< calories out should show results.

superman1
07-07-2007, 12:03 AM
You didn't mention anything about your diet. Depending on your level, an hour of tennis might only burn off the equivalent of 2 slices of bread.

Hoosierdad
07-07-2007, 03:27 PM
dcottrill,

I can relate to what you are describing, about difficulty losing weight. I am 50 and slowly losing...finally! I am combining weight training (only with free weights nothing fancy) with cardio interval training. Do a Google for high intensity interval training and you will find a wealth of information on it. I lift first then jump on my stationary bike. As previously mentioned sleep is also important AND at our age so is a check of your testosterone levels. Recently had mine checked and it was low. I had a mis-perception about what supplementing would do to me (rage, aggressiveness, ect.). Actually what happened was the reverse, I felt more calm, confident, stamina was MUCH better when exercising and playing and the weight is now coming off easier. Good luck and don't give in to the outdated thinking of "oh well I am just getting older". Fight it every step of the way and you can get results!

dcottrill
07-07-2007, 04:15 PM
How are yu sleeping? Sleep is imperative to gain muscle/tone .... especially as you get older. Not just 8 hours ..... but 8 quality deep sleep hours is a must.

As I've gotten older I find that I do have sleep issues. I'm usually in bed for 8 hours, but I seem to get only about 6 hours of quality sleep. I feel, however, that this is related to my weight. I carry most of my weight in my belly, and when I lay down to sleep, it feels as if that blubber is pressing down on me, making it hard to breath, making it hard to relax and sleep. I might also have some minor sleep apnea.

dcottrill
07-07-2007, 04:19 PM
You didn't mention anything about your diet. Depending on your level, an hour of tennis might only burn off the equivalent of 2 slices of bread.

My diet isn't terrible, but it could probably use some fine tuning. I eat fairly healthy meals...whole wheat bread, lean meat, lots of chicken and fish. But, I eat at McDonalds or Wendys maybe once a week or so, and I sometimes give into carb cravings just before going to bed...which probably doesn't enhance my ability to sleep. But, I find that if I try to cut back on my food intake, I don't have the energy to work out. :confused:

dcottrill
07-07-2007, 04:22 PM
dcottrill,

AND at our age so is a check of your testosterone levels. Recently had mine checked and it was low.

I had my testosterone checked when I turned 50 and it was normal. I can't believe that 5 years have passed since then. Seems like last week!! Anyway, I guess it's time for another check. Thanks for the tip. Good luck with your continued success.

PeakXV
07-07-2007, 04:47 PM
Might be a good idea for the MacDonalds & Wendy's habit to end soon. As for the carb cravings in the evening - try and feed that with a high quality Whey protein shake with maybe some orange juice, brown rice syrup, Zero fat yoghurt & banana. This is a great tasting "quality calorie" drink that will pay off in a dramatic increase of energy for your workouts & more importantly block your desire for any "empty calorie" food fillings.

Shoalwater
07-07-2007, 06:33 PM
6 small meals a day, 2 of the six high protein shakes

a ton of water

cut out almost all the fat out of your diet, especially saturated fat

work out 5 times a week for 30 minutes, mix cardio and weights

fat will melt away and you will build solid muscle mass



Have been on the above for the past year after learning of high cholesterol, have lost 20 pounds and am in the best shape of my life.

Good luck, change your lifestyle and enjoy! You can do it.

armand
07-07-2007, 06:42 PM
Playing tennis is not that great of a workout. But it does punish the body.

chess9
07-08-2007, 05:41 PM
6 small meals a day, 2 of the six high protein shakes

a ton of water

cut out almost all the fat out of your diet, especially saturated fat

work out 5 times a week for 30 minutes, mix cardio and weights

fat will melt away and you will build solid muscle mass



Have been on the above for the past year after learning of high cholesterol, have lost 20 pounds and am in the best shape of my life.

Good luck, change your lifestyle and enjoy! You can do it.

Yes, and what Midlifecrisis said.

Do not push teeny weeny little baby weights around at the gym. Slowly build your weight training so that you are doing some heavy lifting. You should be doing a lot of SQUATS, DEAD LIFTS, weighted lunges, leg presses, one arm rows, cable rows, and ab work. If you don't know what you are doing-and most guys don't but are not into admitting it-then join www.bodybuildingrevealed.com . It's run by Will Brink. For the $49.95 you will get thousands of dollars worth of great advice.

Also, you mention no weight loss. Well, so what? Have you lost FAT and gained muscle? Are you getting stronger in the gym? (If not, you are definitely in need of major help in the gym.)

Excess fat will drive down your testosterone levels and make it hard to get your muscle mass back. So, you must lift heavy, eat anabolic foods, and train like your life depends on it. Remember the saying that at 211 degrees water does not boil, but at 212 it boils. Turn up the heat and get into the next gear.

As midlifecrisis points out, you lose a lot during those years you were raising kids and/or raising hell. You can get some of it back. How much depends on a host of factors too complex for this comment. But, essentially it depends on your will power, and your committment to changing your lifestyle.

I would also add that if you want to get fit, doubles is a complete waste of time the way it is played at most levels in clubs. Unless you are playing at 4.5 and above, you are hardly breaking a sweat and getting little in the way of physical conditioning.

I'm 64, 175 lbs and can still play 3 hours of singles a day if it doesn't get too hot. I did it today.

Good luck!

-Robert