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order
07-10-2007, 02:38 PM
Alright, i've been exercising for tennis for a while and my endurance exercise generally consists of me doing suicides on my drive way which is on a slight incline. I go up and down twice and that is 1 lap. I used to do 5,3,2 laps with breaks in between and a 2 minute break at the end before repeating. I did it 3 times. Today I did 6 laps (took a 35 second break) then 4 laps (took a 25 second break) and then 2 laps. After the 2 laps I rested for 2 minutes and repeated the process 2 more times. I was pretty tired at the end and my heart was racing, can someone tell me if this is bad shape for a tennis player that wants to play singles to be in and if so what I can do to get into better shape? Thank you.

OrangeOne
07-10-2007, 03:06 PM
Alright, i've been exercising for tennis for a while and my endurance exercise generally consists of me doing suicides on my drive way which is on a slight incline. I go up and down twice and that is 1 lap. I used to do 5,3,2 laps with breaks in between and a 2 minute break at the end before repeating. I did it 3 times. Today I did 6 laps (took a 35 second break) then 4 laps (took a 25 second break) and then 2 laps. After the 2 laps I rested for 2 minutes and repeated the process 2 more times. I was pretty tired at the end and my heart was racing, can someone tell me if this is bad shape for a tennis player that wants to play singles to be in and if so what I can do to get into better shape? Thank you.

Probably helpful to know that the above isn't endurance exercise (unless you live on a farm with a 1-mile long driveway).

If you're feeling in less than good shape (haven't exercised for a while? overweight? etc), then you need to start off with endurance exercise - long runs (or fast walks), that sorta thing, before you focus on anaerobic training like you're doing above.

order
07-10-2007, 05:48 PM
Alright, thanks.

Cheez-It
07-10-2007, 05:52 PM
Not just aerobic exercises though, you definately need a good mix of the two.

order
07-11-2007, 09:59 AM
How does a 2 mile run followed by a 10 minute break follwowed by a set of 4 suicides (25 seconds of rest), then 3 suicides (20 seconds of rest) and then 2 suicides ( 2 minutes of rest followed by a repeating of the sets 2 more times sound.

dave333
07-11-2007, 11:10 AM
Depends on how long it takes for you to do 2 miles. I'd reccomend running for 30 minutes straight, which is about 4 miles for me.

chroix
07-11-2007, 11:50 AM
IMO if you are doing suicides you are prob in all right shape. To get in tennis playing shape, play tennis.

RedWeb
07-11-2007, 11:55 AM
...To get in tennis playing shape, play tennis.

Politely disagree with this point... to play top level physical tennis you must work on fitness away from tennis. Playing tennis without a good physical foundation will simply breakdown your body. I believe this is one reason so many people start then stop participating in this sport. It is hard on the body (especially American hardcourt surfaces) and people don't do enough to prepare for and handle that.

order
07-11-2007, 04:12 PM
It's about 4 miles for me too and I have to agree with Redweb. I read and have experienced that playing tennis to get in shape could be pretty bad for you unless you are naturally fit.

order
07-11-2007, 04:13 PM
Sorry for double post but the thing about me doing sucides in that I'm not a very fast sprinter to begin with so I'm not sure about my shape.

K-LEG
07-11-2007, 09:01 PM
Well I run my mile in 7:22 but THE 20 SUICIDES I HAVE TO DO DURING BASKETBALL TRYOUTS IS INSANE AND MY LEGS FEEL LIKE ROCKS. Sorry I just had to get that out, the varsity basketball coach is a little messed up. Anyways I think if you have strong arms and strong wrists which you will eventually develop from playing tennis itself your all good, and you have to be quick.

RedWeb
07-12-2007, 05:27 AM
If you're in good enough shape and of an age to play HS varsity basketball then I'd say you probably have a good enough foundation of fitness. Be sure to focus on stretching as many juniors don't do an adequate job of that (torso, spine, legs especially). Also, if you are playing both at the same time allow for recovery time. A junior's body can take a lot of punishment but you can overdo it. Get plenty of sleep and eat correctly.

Realize that playing in tennis shoes and on hardcourts will be tougher on your legs than playing on wooden floors with basketball shoes even though you jump more in b-ball. In tennis there is a little more violent change of direction and not as much foot sliding as in b-ball.

WildVolley
07-12-2007, 08:49 PM
Let me advise against doing ANY distance running as preparation for tennis.

Tennis requires burst speed, and jogging diminishes quickness. If you need aerobic fitness, I'd advise doing aerobics off a box or swimming rather than jogging. I think that playing basketball, with the starts and stops is a better way to gain cardio fitness than jogging. It's also better at strengthening leg muscles for tennis. Sprints with rests are good. As are drills that have you running backwards, shuffling, and doing cross steps and the like.

superman1
07-13-2007, 12:38 AM
I like to get on the treadmill at the highest incline, and just gradually increase the speed until I'm sprinting. Then I sprint for as long as I can, and try to beat the last time. Then I get on the bike for around 20 minutes, then go back on the treadmill at 0 incline and sprint for as long as I can, which is much longer than the time before.

The problem with the treadmill is that it's soft on your feet, and you find out quickly that the tennis court is much less forgiving on your joints and thus tires you out more quickly. But if you play enough tennis, you get used to that. So for me it's a combination of off court training and playing my way into shape.

K-LEG
07-13-2007, 01:02 AM
[QUOTE=RedWeb;1585528]If you're in good enough shape and of an age to play HS varsity basketball then I'd say you probably have a good enough foundation of fitness. QUOTE]

I said the varsity coach is crazy during tryouts... I play JV i'm a sophmore, but the person who watches us during the tryouts and tells us what to do is the varsity coach lol. He's nuts man.

chess9
07-13-2007, 03:45 AM
Let me advise against doing ANY distance running as preparation for tennis.

Tennis requires burst speed, and jogging diminishes quickness. If you need aerobic fitness, I'd advise doing aerobics off a box or swimming rather than jogging. I think that playing basketball, with the starts and stops is a better way to gain cardio fitness than jogging. It's also better at strengthening leg muscles for tennis. Sprints with rests are good. As are drills that have you running backwards, shuffling, and doing cross steps and the like.

Can you name one pro tennis player who doesn't do distance runs of 3+ miles? Roddick was quoted as doing 10milers outside his Texas home. I realize he's only, what, number 3 or 4 (haven't checked lately), and might be doing something wrong.

I used to train with a Mexican Davis Cupper in the 1960's and he ran three miles, with some fartleks, almost every day.

Oh, and the ancient Jim Courier ran a 5K race a few months ago in 18:15 or so. This as a retired guy. :)

-Robert

dave333
07-13-2007, 03:55 AM
^^^Agree. Long distance running is the way to go when building endurance. Sprints and that other stuff help build speed, agility, muscle, but not endurance. Even sprinters do long distance (3-4 miles), though they do it faster with less distance.

Mad iX
07-13-2007, 04:22 AM
I like the exercise bike.
Go at a moderate speed for 2 mins, maintaining your heart rate at about 80% max.
Then for 1 min, bump up the resistance to max and go flat out. After that, go back to moderate speed again. This builds up "explosiveness".
Unless you're a bigtime clay specialist, your matches are probably pretty tiring points and then you have 20 secs to recover and then it's back to running around again.
So I think having a workout based on this is more worthwhile than simply running 10 miles. You can still run 10 miles, but do it in the same style, 2 mins moderate then 1 min flat out.

chess9
07-13-2007, 04:55 AM
Distance running gives you faster recovery rates. That's ONE of the many benefits from distance running. Cycling is very good, but if you use cycling in place of distance running, I would recommend LONG sets of steady sub-LT riding. About 60-75 minutes should be long enough for most amateurs.

The problem with recommending sprinting to anyone is that they may not have a sound aerobic base for sprinting. Before you can sprint, you must be able to run. To run well, you must "earn" a host of neuro-muscular changes through about a 4-12 week period of conditioning.

Anyway, everyone who plays tennis should spend some time each week on conditioning, which should include, stretching, strength training, aerobic training, and anaerobic training, IMHO. Since we get plenty of anaerobic training ON COURT, that is the one bit of training I would forego IF I had to forego any of the training.

Btw, one of the biggest scourages of modern man is weight gain, so a few long runs (or rides) per week, will go a long way towards keeping the pig at bay.

Best of luck to everyone.

-Robert

WildVolley
07-13-2007, 11:04 AM
I stand by my suggestion not to engage in distance running as training for tennis. I'm not really that interested in what a lot of pros do, as I was a decent athlete in college and noticed that many coaches don't actually follow the exercise research.

One of my brothers got his undergrad degree in kinesthesiology (what used to be called a PE degree). His department did a lot of empirical research. This research show that jogging and most endurance work has been over-hyped. If you want explosive power and quickness, weight-lifting and high-intensity exercise is going to do you a lot more good than jogging and plodding around. In layman's terms, jogging develops "slow-twitch" muscle fibers and reduces your vertical jump and quickness - not good things on a tennis court.

Here's an interesting study about high-intensity exercise developing endurance: http://www.mcmaster.ca/ua/opr/nms/newsreleases/2005/gibala.html

Yeah, you do need to start slow if you are out of shape. I still am not a fan of jogging, which is good for me because I always liked sprinting and hated distance work.

cshokraii
07-14-2007, 05:07 AM
I had the same problem a year ago. I would try swimming actually, I do 25 meters stop for about 5 secs and do it again. Try that until you can do 10 pretty fast. The other thing I did was leg lifts, calf raises, leg curls, leg extentions, lunges and jump roap. This will definitely help your endurance. Lastly those suicides are great but try them a different way. I go to my local high school tennis court and put down 8 balls on the center service lines and doubles lines. Do 3 sets of that on a hot day but you have to make sure you pick up and put down the balls each time you get to them, it's hard. If this doesn't get you in shape then nothing will