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View Full Version : Acupuncture:Helpful or Not?


abdjeter2
07-14-2007, 09:53 PM
I have had tennis elbow in the past and just iced and applied bengay which eventually caused the pain to go away. I have also had wrist pain which dissipated over a month or two. Now a few years since these pains i am starting to feel them again while playing. I have heard that acupuncture can relieve these pains and even heal them. Is this true? All input would be appreciated. Thanks

circusmouse
07-14-2007, 11:05 PM
I've never had tennis elbow, but I can confirm that acupuncture can be helpful for wrist pain. I had acupuncture for some wrist pain related to computer use a few years ago and found it helpful. I've had a lot of acupuncture over the past six years, probably about 50 sessions, and I've found it to be quite effective for a number of ailments. The effect on muscle pain is difficult to deny. It's great for back pain.

I feel compelled to mention that acupuncture is based on the underlying belief that health is the result of energies in the body. Poor health is thought to be the result of imbalances in those energies. You may go in for wrist pain that will receive specific treatment, but a good acupuncturist will probably also look at your health in general and attempt to correct imbalances. A good acupuncturist will ask you a lot of questions when you visit, far more questions than a doctor would ask. You might want to think of some other things beyond the wrist and tennis elbow that you would like to work on, because you'll get best results when the acupuncturist has a full picture of your health issues. I've generally wanted to work on my mood swings and irritability, and I've found acupuncture to be incredible for mood issues. I also recommend getting Chinese herbs if the acupuncturist suggests them. I didn't find the pills very effective, but I got a lot of help from the ground herbs. They taste awful, but they're find if you add them to a few ounces of fruit sauce (I used mango). Don't get the bulk herbs if you can avoid them, though. You're supposed to make them into tea, and it's nasty.

heycal
07-15-2007, 12:59 AM
^
50 times at how much a pop? What's the total cost here?

Anytime I hear about people raving about chiropractors or accupunturists, I'm often alarmed to hear about how often they see these people. You've had to see this guy 50 times?? That's not exactly an endorsement in my book. And I'm guessing many of those injuries would have healed on their own, for free, had you done nothing during the period you were seeing this guy. Or a single shot of cortisone would have done the trick.

ollinger
07-15-2007, 10:00 AM
An interesting study done at Columbia U. found response to acupuncture (for pain) correlated very well with hypnotizability (measured by standard scales). The hypothesis was that acupuncture is a form of hypnosis.

heycal
07-15-2007, 10:23 AM
An interesting study done at Columbia U. found response to acupuncture (for pain) correlated very well with hypnotizability (measured by standard scales). The hypothesis was that acupuncture is a form of hypnosis.

Very interesting. And suggestible people who are open to hypnosis respond better to it presumably, correct?

One of the reasons I haven't tried accupuncture or chiropractors (or hypnosis) is because I'm incredibly skeptical, and because I'm incredibly skeptical, I think it would be even less likely to work for me, a sort of vicious cycle thing.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't often hear of skeptics like myself being converted in such matters -- usually it seems that the people who benefit from alternative medicine are those who went in to it with an open mind.

Phil
07-15-2007, 10:26 AM
I have had tennis elbow in the past and just iced and applied bengay which eventually caused the pain to go away. I have also had wrist pain which dissipated over a month or two. Now a few years since these pains i am starting to feel them again while playing. I have heard that acupuncture can relieve these pains and even heal them. Is this true? All input would be appreciated. Thanks

I don't think accupuncture will heal tennis elbow. I had two sessions years ago and the result was temporary relief-for a couple weeks. I suppose I could have gone 100 more times at a cost of $75 per pop and the elbow would have been healed, but that may have come about due to the natural healing medicine of TIME and not the needles. Sounds like your ice/Ben Gay treatment worked just as well or better.

I had accupuncture recently on my knee-because the conventional doctor who treated me also used accupuncture to supplement the "western" treatment. I can't tell if it helped or not. But nothing's healed.

javier sergio
07-15-2007, 10:45 AM
I have had tennis elbow in the past and just iced and applied bengay which eventually caused the pain to go away. I have also had wrist pain which dissipated over a month or two. Now a few years since these pains i am starting to feel them again while playing. I have heard that acupuncture can relieve these pains and even heal them. Is this true? All input would be appreciated. Thanks


I had tennis elbow; I tried acupuncture which helped a little.
What really helped me to cure TE was just couple a massage session with a good therapist.

spadesss
07-16-2007, 09:57 AM
^
50 times at how much a pop? What's the total cost here?

Anytime I hear about people raving about chiropractors or accupunturists, I'm often alarmed to hear about how often they see these people. You've had to see this guy 50 times?? That's not exactly an endorsement in my book. And I'm guessing many of those injuries would have healed on their own, for free, had you done nothing during the period you were seeing this guy. Or a single shot of cortisone would have done the trick.

chiropractors or accupunturists...
I visit the chiropractor twice a month.
Had accupunture done in the past (3 or 4 times). The problem in my knees went away permanently. Both treatements will varied from person to person and case by case.
Some claimed chiropractors are a fake.
Its one of those "must see it or feel it" to believed in it.

Both are expensive, accupunturists more and may not be covered by insurance.
Accupunturists is not for those who hate needle, like myself.

I recommended see a doctor or specialist if pain doesn't go away. And specially when it hurts your tennis game.

circusmouse
07-16-2007, 12:09 PM
^
50 times at how much a pop? What's the total cost here?

Anytime I hear about people raving about chiropractors or accupunturists, I'm often alarmed to hear about how often they see these people. You've had to see this guy 50 times?? That's not exactly an endorsement in my book. And I'm guessing many of those injuries would have healed on their own, for free, had you done nothing during the period you were seeing this guy. Or a single shot of cortisone would have done the trick.

I go to a local acupuncture school and receive treatment from students, so the cost has been $15-20 per pop, so maybe a thousand dollars over a period of six years. Not too bad when you consider that I've only had to pay for a western doctor visit once in that same period, which was for a knee problem that went away when I strengthened my legs and back. The doctor charged about 300 to tell me that there was nothing wrong with my knee. It took him about five minutes to make the diagnosis, and he suggested I see a physical therapist. Thankfully I had insurance and only had to pay 25 or 30 for his help.

Let me add that I didn't go to the acupuncturists all for one continual problem. I've had a number of aches and pains dealt with there, but I've gone more than anything for general health and mood issues. A few weeks ago I was feeling depressed and irritable and went to the acupuncturist for the first time in over a year, and I left the office feeling much better. The improvement was enough to lift me out of my funk, and I'm still doing well.

As I said before, acupuncturists don't just treat individual problems. They try to improve overall health and balance. Perhaps I've paid a thousand dollars or so over the last six years for acupuncture, but I've also been in great health during that time, better than before I tried acupuncture. Others have noted the improvement in my mood.

Perhaps it is just wishful thinking, but I think acupuncture is great for maintaining good health. The truth is that western doctors treat acute problems well but aren't very good at treating overall health. I'm happy to go to the acupuncturist so that I don't have to go to the doctor.

abdjeter2
07-16-2007, 09:53 PM
thanks for all of the input. it sounds like acupuncture can be beneficial if money and time are not issues. i would like to try a few sessions and see how the pain feels after them. if no help i will continue with "time" healing and ice/bengay.

circusmouse
07-17-2007, 09:33 AM
thanks for all of the input. it sounds like acupuncture can be beneficial if money and time are not issues. i would like to try a few sessions and see how the pain feels after them. if no help i will continue with "time" healing and ice/bengay.

I definitely recommend it for improving health, and it probably will help with TE/wrist pain. However, if TE/wrist pain are your only complaints and you're not interested in acupuncture for other chronic, sub-syndromal issues, then I would recommend deep tissue massage. It will be better at treating the physical cause of the tendon pain. Acupuncture probably won't have as lasting an impact on the TE/wrist pain, but it could be good if you have additional issues like anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, body heat regulation problems (feeling hot or cold), headaches, indigestion, poor circulation, etc. I've noticed that many people just accept those problems as genetic and untreatable, or treatable only by medicines that have nasty side-effects. I know a lot of people who've done acupuncture, and they're often surprised at how effective it is for treating those mysterious, nagging problems and making them feel better in general.