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love2play
08-11-2007, 06:50 PM
I am an intermediate player with an elbow problem, but I don't like the way I play with a head-light, heavy racquet. I need something oversize with more power, but not too head heavy.

I am now trying to decide between a Volkl DNX 3 and a Dunlop 900 Aerogel. The Volkl looks better on paper -- it's even weighted, a bit heavier, etc. -- but when I test it I feel the vibration more in my wrist than with the more head heavy and lighter Dunlop.

Should I buy the Volkl anyway and just get different string (what kind?) and have it strung at a different setting?

ClimbK2
08-11-2007, 06:57 PM
I can't speak for those specific racquets, however I'd plan to play with a soft string. Perhaps natural gut mains, & a soft multi on the crosses to save $. Lower tension's good too.

have your stokes examined by a pro too. 1H BHs often cause problems, e.g. leading with your elbow

Lot's of good posts on the topic, although it looks like you've done some research already.

goober
08-11-2007, 07:06 PM
I think you should demo some more racquets. The Dunlop has a stiffness of 72 which is very high and not good for your elbow. It is also extended length which is not good fo your elbow.

If you really think you would like the racquet though you could add lead tape to the handle to make it heavier and headlight.

love2play
08-11-2007, 07:16 PM
Thanks, Goober. Most of the racquets I like do have the 27.5 length. But the Volkl's stiffness is just 68, so that is better than the Dunlop, too. Or is that difference really meaningless, not enough?

anirut
08-11-2007, 07:32 PM
I am an intermediate player with an elbow problem, but I don't like the way I play with a head-light, heavy racquet.

What's the racket you're playing with now? What's your string tension and string type? May be you could try changing just the strings?

These info will be very helpful.

Gantz
08-11-2007, 08:10 PM
I think you should demo some more racquets. The Dunlop has a stiffness of 72 which is very high and not good for your elbow. It is also extended length which is not good fo your elbow.

If you really think you would like the racquet though you could add lead tape to the handle to make it heavier and headlight.

aren't longer rackets more arm-friendly due to the more absorbtion of the shock from the frame?

Steve Huff
08-11-2007, 08:50 PM
Goober makes an excellent point about the extra-length rackets. I used them for a while when they first came out. After thinking I needed elbow surgery, I decided to start using an older frame again. My TE disappeared within 3 months. I ended up buying a few new Pro Kennex 5gs. They saved my arm. Sometime later, I decided I needed a little more pop. I bought a Pro Kennex 15g. It was 27.5" long, had the kinetic, supposedly "arm-saving" material inside, and had that extra pop I was looking for. By the end of 1 season, my tennis elbow was back again to the point I knew I couldn't keep using the longer, more powerful frames. Back to the 5g. Tennis elbow gone. There are plenty of rackets out there that won't hurt your arm. Longer, stiffer, more powerful frames are NOT among them. I don't think you'll find too many PK's anymore, but a couple of the frames I've used without problems are: 1)Fischer M Speed 105--really nice frame, flexible, 27", 2) Head iRadical OS--the new Flexpoint is probably nice too. 107", 27" long, fairly good power 3) Prince O3 Tour MP--95 sq in, 27" long, good control, Wilson n 6.1--95sq in, 27" long, great volleying racket. I've heard that some of the Yonex frames are nice too, I just haven't tried them. I'm using a Pro Supex Dynamic Energy frame now. It's similar to a Babolat Aeropro Drive. I get good power. I'm just hoping it's not going to bother my arm. It's 27" long, yet a little stiffer than the Fischer I was using. If playing in pain or reducing the number of times you play is an acceptable alternative, go for the long rackets. If not, listen to advice from others who have been there. If you have arm problems, stay with standard length rackets that aren't too stiff.

goober
08-11-2007, 09:01 PM
Thanks, Goober. Most of the racquets I like do have the 27.5 length. But the Volkl's stiffness is just 68, so that is better than the Dunlop, too. Or is that difference really meaningless, not enough?

68 is better than 72 and and probably noticeable, but most people with elbow problems should be looking at the 64 or lower range. The problem is that with light OS racquets are typically made stiff to compensate for the lighter weight. You may want to look into the DNV V1 OS version. I think the specs are better than either the Dunlop 900 or DNX3. It is also known for its arm comfort but I have never hit with it personally.

Don't forget to string at the lower end of recommended tension with a soft string i.e. natural gut or multi synthetic.

love2play
08-12-2007, 07:09 PM
How can half an inch on the length make that much difference on how your arm feels? I am not doubting your experience, just don't understand why.

Also, interestingly, the ad shows that Dunlop's weight at 72, but the racquet itself, which I am demo-ing, shows it at 69.

Steve Huff
08-12-2007, 08:00 PM
It's a matter of leverage. 1/2" doesn't seem like a lot, but when it comes to leverage, it is. Longer rackets can generate more power and spin only because they are further from your hand (the fulcrum), so as the hand turns, the furthest out points move faster in an arc than any point closer to the fulcrum. Likewise, when something (the ball) contacts a point further out, it applies more leverage to the other end (the hand, arm, elbow). Some of the engineer players here could probably tell you by how much the leverage increases. I can't, but I know it's significant.

goober
08-12-2007, 08:09 PM
How can half an inch on the length make that much difference on how your arm feels? I am not doubting your experience, just don't understand why.

Also, interestingly, the ad shows that Dunlop's weight at 72, but the racquet itself, which I am demo-ing, shows it at 69.

Moment is increased by the extra length. From raqcuet research:

Moment is the turning force pivoting the racquet head down when you hold the racquet parallel to the ground. Moment, in Newton.meters, is a measure of how heavy the racquet feels to hold up parallel to the ground (not merely the weight of the racquet, but this weight multiplied by its lever arm).

Moment should be especially important for juniors and ladies. A light racquet having a balance point far from the hand may have a larger Moment than a heavy racquet with a head-light balance, so merely knowing the weight of a racquet is not enough, and may be misleading.

It is deplorable that ignorant consumers are being enticed to buy dangerous racquets by misleading sales ploys like inviting them to pick up the racquet by the wrong end to see how light it is. This "pick up appeal" pitch is causing tennis to lose players and popularity at an alarming rate. What counts is Moment, not weight. Moment is the racquet's weight times its lever arm, which is the distance to the balance point from the axis of rotation (this axis is at the middle of the hand, 7 cm from the handle end). Weight in the metric system is the mass of the racquet, in kilograms, times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 meters/s2), and the distance to the balance point is in meters. The unit of measure of torque is the Newton.meter (1 Newton.meter = 0.7375 foot pounds of torque = the same force you would feel holding a 3.6 ounce weight at the end of a meter stick). The lower the Moment, the better.

Moment is key for two reasons: (1) a racquet with a high Moment is bad because it is hard to hold up and to position for volleys and returns, especially for juniors and ladies; and (2) Moment multiplied by Torque gives the Torsion, which is the screwdriver twist about the racquet's handle centerline resulting from impacts, even impacts on the centerline. High Torsion is bad for tennis elbow.


As for your other note: TW measures RA and other specs on 3 different racquets and averages them from what I understand. Often there are discrepancies from the manufacture's specs.