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View Full Version : Should i cut out the strings when i break them?


Adam21343245
10-21-2004, 01:52 PM
Should i cut out the strings when i break them? Or should i just leave them they way they are?

Jerry Seinfeld
10-21-2004, 02:13 PM
It is best to cut them out because it relieves the un-uniform stresses on the frame that occurs when a string breaks.

LoveThisGame
10-21-2004, 06:07 PM
My viewpoint is different from many folks on this.

It is don't cut out the strings if you are going to get the racquet re-strung "soon". On the other hand, if you broke strings and are going to put the frame in the closet for the winter, then cut the strings.

Why do I say this?

1) Many folks do not know how best to cut the strings, so the frame may well get a shot of stress.

2) When I get a racquet to re-string, I inspect it. If the strings have been cut and removed, I don't know where the break was located. If it was at the frame and my pretty thorough inspection somehow doesn't catch a "sharp" spot, then trouble looms. Also, if the strings had been badly notched, I won't know this and can't suggest using a more durable string.

3) The only frames I have seen "bulge" upon string breakage, assuming non-Borg like tension, were the original Wilson Profiles. But even they returned to normal symmetric shape when the strings were cut.

Gaines Hillix
10-22-2004, 05:43 AM
I recommend cutting the strings, but leaving them in the frame. Just start in the middle and then alternate from one side to the other on a line from the upper left to the lower right part of the string bed.

10s99
10-22-2004, 10:33 AM
i also tell folks to cut them out in the way gaines outlined.

i show them what to look for in terms of problems - where the string is breaking, notching, etc. then they can tell me if they think they have grommet trouble or need stronger strings.

silent bob
10-22-2004, 08:58 PM
Lovethisgame - I think you've got it backward.

If the strings are badly notched you should NOT be suggesting a more durable string. Normally badly notched strings have been in the frame a reasonable amount. If you DON'T see notches on a synthetic gut, then a more durable string may be useful.

LoveThisGame
10-23-2004, 10:10 AM
silent bob wrote:
"If the strings are badly notched you should NOT be suggesting a more durable string. Normally badly notched strings have been in the frame a reasonable amount. If you DON'T see notches on a synthetic gut, then a more durable string may be useful."


Try as I might, I fail to understand what you've said.

1) I keep stringing records on customers, so I know how long their strings last. If I see strings that are notched up quite a bit and this is not normal for them, it means that either we changed string last time, they have added more topspin to their game, or they have been playing more frequently. Why not ask questions and check if we should adjust the string used?

2) Badly notched strings can happen in short order for a strong topspin player. Just observe on this forum the number of folks saying that they get only 2-3 sets on a stringing.

3) Your last sentence seems to say that if the string is not breaking because of notching that we should turn to an even more durable string. That puzzles me. Furthermore, folks who don't break strings hardly at all, should restring before breaking because besides the notching issue there are also issues of tension loss and material fatigue. Someone who goes a way long period without breaking string is a candidate for a LESS durable string so that they get the benefit of that more playable string along with a lively string (considering the tension loss and material fatigue issue).

silent bob
10-24-2004, 06:13 AM
whatever . . . all I was trying to say is that strings that are not very durable tend to break BEFORE they even get notched - at least for me. A more durable string is usually notched by the time it breaks. Hence, in the absence of other information, the absence of notches on broken strings would suggest a durability problem - not the other way around - at least in my experience.

LoveThisGame
10-24-2004, 08:37 AM
From what you just said now I can see your logic.

Notching is far and away what I've seen to be the cause for string breaking. Another source is breakage at the frame from a sharp edge (bad grommet barrel), but in your case you would have noticed that. Yet another source is a hit near the frame which exerts a shearing force on the string, severing it. This can come from overheads or serves which typically make contact with the ball towards the tip; a little error and you hit near the frame. Or it comes from a mishit.

Racquetball players experience hits near the frame because walls and floors get in the way. Players with poor eyesight can experience more mishits. I can remember sleuthing why an older racqutball player was breaking strings too often, and questioning finally led to the fact that his eyesight has deteriorated and he was having a lot of "off-center" hits.

The only other cause which comes to mind is too strong clamping during stringing, so that the string is "strangled" and weakened.