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View Full Version : The prestige...care to shed some light?


soggyramen
08-13-2007, 04:30 PM
i've always been intrigued by the prestige series i mean just the name sounds cool "Prestige" anyways i'm looking to try this racquet just to you know add it to my "just for fun collection" can anyone tell me how this racquet performs and what racquets it's similar too

snoflewis
08-13-2007, 04:39 PM
prestige rackets pretty much set the standard for both midsize and midplus 18x20 rackets...personally, i like the fp prestige out of all of the midpluses and the pc600 out of all the mids...

soggyramen
08-13-2007, 04:41 PM
prestige rackets pretty much set the standard for both midsize and midplus 18x20 rackets...personally, i like the fp prestige out of all of the midpluses and the pc600 out of all the mids...

so what does the mid bring to the table that the midplus doesn't and vice versa

rounick
08-13-2007, 04:57 PM
The mid is a control freak.,and great for serving.

The PC600 offers a beautiful and accurate feel that you get addicted to.

LafayetteHitter
08-13-2007, 05:06 PM
Here is an example of what the Prestige Mid 600 does for you. If a tennis player doesn't know what "pocketing the ball" means take a pc600 out for a test ride. Today I was out hitting with Fabrice Leroy (from TW boards) and he was hitting his usual Tour 10 Gen 2 Volkl and we had my Volkl Tour 10 DNX Mid out. Well towards the end I pulled out my Pc600 which is brand new from the TW batch and strung with Gut mains and Cyberflash poly crosses. When we were done he said, wait just a few more and I could tell he didn't want to put it down. When you strike the ball well with the pc600 there is simply some magic going on with the feel of the ball that you really cannot explain. My Dnx10 is very forgiving for a midsized frame and I really have nothing negative to say about it in any aspect. It is definately more suitable for playing against heavy topspin modern game guys but the PC600 sure is a special racquet.

Ronaldo
08-13-2007, 05:41 PM
Unlike most racquets the mid's sweetspot is centered and relatively high in the hoop. Only the midplus, Prince Graphite OS and Precision Graphite 700 compare IMHO.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 05:43 PM
The Prestige WAS a great frame back in the day when it was usable for the pros. In fact the PC was in far more bags <by far> of ATPers than the ps85. They really fatigued quickly however, and I would venture to say that the current remakes of this frame arent close to the same as the original ones..I really dont think the new remakes have any Twaron in them, but feel free to correct me if I am wrong about this. Twaron <to me> is what made this frame distinctive. As for me, I happily used the Turqouise head frame back then (the one Wheaton used and I forget its name..maybe Elite Pro?)..I liked the ball feel of this frame better and served better with it.

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 05:58 PM
The Prestige WAS a great frame back in the day when it was usable for the pros. In fact the PC was in far more bags <by far> of ATPers than the ps85. They really fatigued quickly however, and I would venture to say that the current remakes of this frame arent close to the same as the original ones..I really dont think the new remakes have any Twaron in them, but feel free to correct me if I am wrong about this. Twaron <to me> is what made this frame distinctive. As for me, I happily used the Turqouise head frame back then (the one Wheaton used and I forget its name..maybe Elite Pro?)..I liked the ball feel of this frame better and served better with it.

Wheaton used the Turquoise Graphite Pro.
Having used the originals back in the 90's and have a few from the latest batch. I am are very satisfied with them. You are always go to have subtle variations of racquets in feel from different production runs of a racquet. Especially a racquet that has been in production as long as the Prestige Classic 600 had been. Do you think a Dunlop Maxply Fort manufactured in 1962 had the identical feel of Dunlop Maxply Fort manufactured in 1978. No, there were subtle differences in feel.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 06:12 PM
Wheaton used the Turquoise Graphite Pro.
Having used the originals back in the 90's and have a few from the latest batch. I am are very satisfied with them. You are always go to have subtle variations of racquets in feel from different production runs of a racquet. Especially a racquet that has been in production as long as the Prestige Classic 600 had been. Do you think a Dunlop Maxply Fort manufactured in 1962 had the identical feel of Dunlop Maxply Fort manufactured in 1978. No, there were subtle differences in feel.

Thanks..I couldnt remember the name of it, and perhaps it had a couple different names during its run, as i think you know head used to really play lots of games with their model names back then
Racquet differences within the same model can have more than subtle differences and the PC really hasnt been in any sort of mainstream production for years now....neither has the ps85.....they accumulate enough orders and exclusivity for these racquets to make a production run every so often, but they've been essentially discontinued for years. i would guess that the Fort being made of wood would have far less variances over its cycle than a PC which contains Twaron vs one which doesnt

Ronaldo
08-13-2007, 06:19 PM
Curious, never owned or used a NEW PC600 or Prestige Tour. My used mids always felt overly damped compared to a new iPrestige or LM Prestige.

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 06:20 PM
NoBadMojo,
The Graphite Pro was the only name that racquet had. HEAD made many more racquets using that same mold with different layups and with less graphite and more fiberglass. Like the Comp Pro, Club Pro, S.E. Pro, and.....
Have you ever hit with a Prestige Classic 600 from the last batch that TW had? Don from TW never answered the question as to whether it had Twaron in it or not. Don had said that they did not think so but would check to confirm. They never came back with a answer. To me they feel like they do have Twaron.
Also unlike the original Pro Staff that has been manufactured in 4 different countries (U.S.A., St. Vincent, Taiwan, and China). The Prestige Classic 600 has always so far been manufactured in Kennelbach, Austria. It has only been finished in the Czech Republic since 1998.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 06:37 PM
NoBadMojo,
The Graphite Pro was the only name that racquet had. HEAD made many more racquets using that same mold with different layups and with less graphite and more fiberglass.
Have you ever hit with a Prestige Classic 600 from the last batch that TW had? Don from TW never answered the question as to whether it had Twaron in it or not. Don had said that they did not think so but would check to confirm. They never came back with a answer. To me they feel like they do have Twaron.

I was curious about the Twaron and I was the one posting about it back then. To me, the fact that my query went unanswered indicated the racquet didnt have Twaron in it. All of the original ones I've ever seen and hit all clearly said they contained twaron...twaron makes for a really unique feel i think....somehow both firm almost harsh but yet somehow soft and a really unique preciseness to it...i havent hit with any of the pc600's other than the originals and I used to play the TriSys300 for a while which was a PC with the suspension grip as i bet you know and it also was very clearly marked as containing Twaron..back then, the regular PC wasnt even available in the States...they were pushing the TriSys300 instead

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 06:52 PM
I was curious about the Twaron and I was the one posting about it back then. To me, the fact that my query went unanswered indicated the racquet didnt have Twaron in it. All of the original ones I've ever seen and hit all clearly said they contained twaron...twaron makes for a really unique feel i think....somehow both firm almost harsh but yet somehow soft and a really unique preciseness to it...i havent hit with any of the pc600's other than the originals and I used to play the TriSys300 for a while which was a PC with the suspension grip as i bet you know and it also was very clearly marked as containing Twaron

Since you have not hit with the last TW batch of PC600 you should refrain from talking about things you have not experienced.
The PC600 from the 90's nothing on the frames never stated whether they had Twaron in them or composition. The only thing the Trisys 300 talked about on the frame was the Suspension Grip.

Here are a few PC600 from the 90's and no where on the frame does it say Twaron.
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w50/vsbabolat/attachmentf431d0f6.jpg
On the other side of the racquet they have only written "HEAD".

The Only Time HEAD had Twaron written on the frames was in the 80's when HEAD first started using Twaron.

The fact that Don did not answer the question means nothing.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 07:03 PM
we disagree..all my TriSys frames clearly said Twaron on them as did every PC I've ever seen...granted I havent seen them all and moved on to Fischer sponsorships, and obviously labeling and cosmetics changed all the time, but we can declare you right and me wrong as you like. maybe you dont live in the States. as you know product lines differ geographically

Ronaldo
08-13-2007, 07:04 PM
Twaron is another name for Kevlar?

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 07:08 PM
Twaron is another name for Kevlar?

Basically yes. It is a aramid fiber.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 07:28 PM
Twaron is another name for Kevlar?

It's from the kevlar family but as used in tennis racquets, it has an entirely different feel. As I said earlier, the PC fatigued quickly and maybe thats' why its use in tennis racquets was pretty shortlived compared to Kevlar which is still used.

Ronaldo
08-13-2007, 07:36 PM
It's from the kevlar family but as used in tennis racquets, it has an entirely different feel. As I said earlier, the PC fatigued quickly and maybe thats' why its use in tennis racquets was pretty shortlived compared to Kevlar which is still used.

Didn't the PT 280/630 use Twaron in its construction? PC600 about the only racquet that compares to the old Volkl Comp series IMHO.

NoBadMojo
08-13-2007, 07:40 PM
Didn't the PT 280/630 use Twaron in its construction? PC600 about the only racquet that compares to the old Volkl Comp series IMHO.

I dunno man....thats a frame I really never hit over the years for whatever reason. i'm sure someone else will know. thought it was graphite/fglass

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 07:40 PM
It's from the kevlar family but as used in tennis racquets, it has an entirely different feel. As I said earlier, the PC fatigued quickly and maybe thats' why its use in tennis racquets was pretty shortlived compared to Kevlar which is still used.

Twaron is a material that is very light and is stronger than Steel. I have never had a problem with any my PC600 fatiguing quickly.

This is what Twaron really is and it's different applications.
http://www.basf-fb.de/en/intermed/news/topstory/archiv/leichtgewicht.htm?id=V00-MQ8ZQAviFbw2.11

vsbabolat
08-13-2007, 07:45 PM
Didn't the PT 280/630 use Twaron in its construction? PC600 about the only racquet that compares to the old Volkl Comp series IMHO.

The Pro Tour 280/630 has Twaron in it also. HEAD started putting Twaron in it's racquets in 1986 with the Prestige Pro (TXP in the U.S.A). For a while all HEAD racquets had Twaron in them.

Ronaldo
08-13-2007, 07:57 PM
I dunno man....thats a frame I really never hit over the years for whatever reason. i'm sure someone else will know. thought it was graphite/fglass

Yes, more fiberglass in the layup than the Pro series. And used the Big Grommets too!

retrowagen
08-13-2007, 08:59 PM
The Pro Tour 280/630 has Twaron in it also. HEAD started putting Twaron in it's racquets in 1986 with the Prestige Pro (TXP in the U.S.A). For a while all HEAD racquets had Twaron in them.
Indeed, circa 1988/1989 all but the base models (Club Pro/Master, and junior aluminum-framed rackets) were made in Kennelbach and had some Twaron. In 1989, they even made light of the Twaron content in the racket names themselves, i.e. Graphite Pro TF, Composite Pro TF, etc. (where TF stood for "Twaron Fibre"). I bought every version of Trisys 300 (and 270, come to think of it) available in the US when they were new; none of them had any mark or emblem saying Twaron on them. The earlier Prestige Pro, and Elite Pro did, however.

Twaron and Kevlar are poly-aramid synthetic fibers with virtually the same chemical structure. Kevlar was introduced by DuPont in 1973 and Twaron was introduced by the Dutch Azko Nobel division, Enka BV, at almost the same time. However, due to financial problems at Enka, Twaron was not used commercially until 1986. I believe the Head TXP and Prestige Pro were among the first (if not the first) commercial products to use it. Twaron is now owned by Teijin, still only made in one Dutch factory, and used for many products.

Having played the TXP, Austrian-made Prestige Pro and PC600, and the new "TW Comission" Czech-finished PC600's, the only difference I note between them is the weight of the Austrians is greater, paint nicer, and the Czechs tend to develop little surface cracks on the bridge if one mishits overheads or serves off the frame (this has happened on two of my Czech PC600's thus far, but it is only cosmetic thus far; the playability hasn't been affected the slightest). However, this may be due to very slight differences in the layup of this last batch. The thinbeam Head mids from 1986 on have proven to be rather fragile; the midplusses (Prestige Tour 660/Classic Tour) particularly so.

rounick
08-14-2007, 03:37 PM
Indeed, circa 1988/1989 all but the base models (Club Pro/Master, and junior aluminum-framed rackets) were made in Kennelbach and had some Twaron. In 1989, they even made light of the Twaron content in the racket names themselves, i.e. Graphite Pro TF, Composite Pro TF, etc. (where TF stood for "Twaron Fibre"). I bought every version of Trisys 300 (and 270, come to think of it) available in the US when they were new; none of them had any mark or emblem saying Twaron on them. The earlier Prestige Pro, and Elite Pro did, however.

Twaron and Kevlar are poly-aramid synthetic fibers with virtually the same chemical structure. Kevlar was introduced by DuPont in 1973 and Twaron was introduced by the Dutch Azko Nobel division, Enka BV, at almost the same time. However, due to financial problems at Enka, Twaron was not used commercially until 1986. I believe the Head TXP and Prestige Pro were among the first (if not the first) commercial products to use it. Twaron is now owned by Teijin, still only made in one Dutch factory, and used for many products.

Having played the TXP, Austrian-made Prestige Pro and PC600, and the new "TW Comission" Czech-finished PC600's, the only difference I note between them is the weight of the Austrians is greater, paint nicer, and the Czechs tend to develop little surface cracks on the bridge if one mishits overheads or serves off the frame (this has happened on two of my Czech PC600's thus far, but it is only cosmetic thus far; the playability hasn't been affected the slightest). However, this may be due to very slight differences in the layup of this last batch. The thinbeam Head mids from 1986 on have proven to be rather fragile; the midplusses (Prestige Tour 660/Classic Tour) particularly so.

Thank you for this post.

I have bought a couple of PC600 in the last 16 months from a different source but I am assuming the same batch,and one of them (the older,more used one) has a couple of those hair cracks you mentioned,barely noticeable,but had me worried a bit,though my conclusion was the same as yours.

Now that I have a second opinion I feel a lot better.

It still is the best racquet out there.My only "problem" is the grip which I have to reshape to my taste cause I can't play if my grips are not absolutely perfect.

redsoxrock930
08-14-2007, 03:48 PM
great racket, great control similar to tecnifibre