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bank5
08-13-2007, 04:33 PM
Is anyone else bothered by this quote by Sam Querrey in Tennis Magazine:

I'll be honest--a lot of guys on the tour work harder than I do. I think I can work harder, and I will in the future. But I don't put my pressure on myself because there's no rush. I obviously want to get higher--as high as I can and as fast as I can. But I want to feel my way and enjoy the process.

I stopped reading the article and pretty much lost hope in the guy after reading that quote.

I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.

Jonny S&V
08-13-2007, 04:36 PM
Is anyone else bothered by this quote by Sam Querrey in Tennis Magazine:



I stopped reading the article and pretty much lost hope in the guy after reading that quote.

I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.

No, I think this quote made me follow him even more. The US has had the majority of teen phenom burn out, and this way I don't think he is going to be one of them.

Volly master
08-13-2007, 04:37 PM
I agree with the OP.

Kids in the US need drive to become better, no one has hunger anymore.

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 04:37 PM
I would have to agree with you. I don't think there is a fire in the bellies of Americans kids nowadays. Compared to the rest of the tennis world America is very low on the totem pole. I think you hit the nail on the head with the video game comment. I am a teaching pro and I have to say that if the kids' parents aren't pushing them they have no desire really to do anything physically active. It is definitely a downward spiral for America.

bank5
08-13-2007, 04:46 PM
No, I think this quote made me follow him even more. The US has had the majority of teen phenom burn out, and this way I don't think he is going to be one of them.

I really hope he just said it to take some pressure off himself, but if he can't handle the pressure he's not going to be #1 or even close.

Maybe the "US phenom burn out" relates back to the work ethic thing.

saram
08-13-2007, 04:58 PM
Once anything is not fun, you lose interest--including tennis. If this is what Querrey needs to progress at his rate--then so be it.

We as fans possess no right to push a player to do anything they want. American tennis sucks--face it....I have.

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 04:59 PM
Once anything is not fun, you lose interest--including tennis. If this is what Querrey needs to progress at his rate--then so be it.

We as fans possess no right to push a player to do anything they want. American tennis sucks--face it....I have.

...........LOL!............. But so true though. :(

saram
08-13-2007, 05:02 PM
...........LOL!............. But so true though. :(

Japan and Thailand will surpass us shortly with better and more players on tour....I am glad we don't declare wars based on our depth of tennis players...we'd be homeless and hungry here in the states....;)

federer envies me
08-13-2007, 05:05 PM
i think the future of american tennis will be john isner or donald young

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 05:11 PM
Japan and Thailand will surpass us shortly with better and more players on tour....I am glad we don't declare wars based on our depth of tennis players...we'd be homeless and hungry here in the states....;)

hahahahahahhah made my tummy hurt. :p

35ft6
08-13-2007, 05:13 PM
That quote doesn't bother me that much. There's more to life than tennis and maybe he's equally concerned with those things.

uc3
08-13-2007, 05:18 PM
That quote doesn't bother me that much. There's more to life than tennis and maybe he's equally concerned with those things.

And that is exactly why we don't see many Americans have success these days. They just don't have that INSANE hunger to become a champion. Having hunger is one thing, having INSANE hunger is another.

saram
08-13-2007, 05:19 PM
i think the future of american tennis will be john isner or donald young


Isner would have to win 21 tie breakers to win a slam...and that's just not happenin'....

Young would have to learn how to win SEVEN matches in a row on the ATP...and that's just not happenin'....

I would put more faith and stock in Beavis and Butthead.....

saram
08-13-2007, 05:19 PM
That quote doesn't bother me that much. There's more to life than tennis and maybe he's equally concerned with those things.

much agreed....

bank5
08-13-2007, 05:27 PM
Once anything is not fun, you lose interest--including tennis. If this is what Querrey needs to progress at his rate--then so be it.

We as fans possess no right to push a player to do anything they want. American tennis sucks--face it....I have.

I don't think American tennis sucks - made it at least to the semis for the Davis Cup and have two guys in the top 10.

I guess it's easier to lose interest when you're driving your Mom's Porche growing up compared to the kid who goes to the court to get away from a war going on in his backyard.

I'm not trying to bash the guy, he can do whatever he wants...just trying to figure out why American tennis is heading downhill.

David L
08-13-2007, 05:35 PM
I really hope he just said it to take some pressure off himself, but if he can't handle the pressure he's not going to be #1 or even close.

Maybe the "US phenom burn out" relates back to the work ethic thing.He probably would'nt get to No.1 anyway.

rrhstennis
08-13-2007, 05:36 PM
If by "American tennis just sucks" you mean that it only has 2 slams in the last 5 years as opposed to Spain's 4 and Switzerland's 11, then yeah I guess it does blow. By most country's standards, that's not too shabby.

If you honestly think any of the current American lot - Roddick, Blake, Isner, Querrey, Young, whoever, have half the talent and skill of Nadal or Federer, I think you're mistaken. I don't think it's just a hunger gap, I think it's a heck of a lot more than that.

Now, if you're saying that Querrey's quote is what will keep him from being a slam champ when Fed and Nads are gone, then you might be right. But right now, he can fight all he wants, and so can Roddick or whoever else for that matter, and they're still going down.

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 05:39 PM
If by "American tennis just sucks" you mean that it only has 2 slams in the last 5 years as opposed to Spain's 4 and Switzerland's 11, then yeah I guess it does blow. By most country's standards, that's not too shabby.

If you honestly think any of the current American lot - Roddick, Blake, Isner, Querrey, Young, whoever, have half the talent and skill of Nadal or Federer, I think you're mistaken. I don't think it's just a hunger gap, I think it's a heck of a lot more than that.

Now, if you're saying that Querrey's quote is what will keep him from being a slam champ when Fed and Nads are gone, then you might be right. But right now, he can fight all he wants, and so can Roddick or whoever else for that matter, and they're still going down.

So two slams in five years. Who won before or after Roddick's 2003 US Open? I think you contradicted yourself in a few of your statements.

saram
08-13-2007, 05:40 PM
I don't think American tennis sucks - made it at least to the semis for the Davis Cup and have two guys in the top 10.

I guess it's easier to lose interest when you're driving your Mom's Porche growing up compared to the kid who goes to the court to get away from a war going on in his backyard.

I'm not trying to bash the guy, he can do whatever he wants...just trying to figure out why American tennis is heading downhill.


It is easy--look at our school systems. Our tennis courts deteriorate every year. Coaches are hard as can be to come by. Schools do not want to fund tennis. There are no concessions to be made from tennis, etc.

American schools want football, baseball, basketball, and wrestling. They want anything that will profit. No school can profit via tennis--only lose money as they have to pay for travel, coaches, etc. Schools make money from packed stadiums selling tickets, hotdogs, burgers, popcorn and soda.

None of the schools or programs that surround schools prior to high-school offer tennis. Kids do not learn about tennis until they enter high-school. Only those that have parents that play are shown the in's and out's of tennis.

Communities will always build a bigger gymnasium, football field, baseball field, etc, with tax dollars. We have been trying for years to improve our tennis facilities in town and the only grants we can get are via the USTA.

No one outside of the USTA has funded tennis in our community in over five years...

THAT...is the demise of American tennis...NO ONE CARES.

rrhstennis
08-13-2007, 05:41 PM
So two slams in five years. Who won before or after Roddick's 2003 US Open? I think you contradicted yourself in a few of your statements.

Agassi's AO in 2003.

What other ones?

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 05:47 PM
Thanks. I couldn't remember for the life of me. I don't think you contradicted yourself. My fault.

rrhstennis
08-13-2007, 05:54 PM
Thanks. I couldn't remember for the life of me. I don't think you contradicted yourself. My fault.

Hey it doesn't matter I was just wondering. I didn't remember for a second when you said that Roddick was the only one and I was like "I know there was 2..." and then it hit me.

I really do agree that this quote and American tennis in general is kind of down and not particularly concerned with getting up. I was just pointing out that the way Federer and Nadal are dominating it doesn't leave room for another country to look but so impressive. I think America has done decent but even those 2 slams were over 4 years ago now... so yeah, we're in a slump by our own standards. But I bet France wishes they were us!

Edit: Actually, France probably wishes they were Spain the last 3 years! ;)

Rhino
08-13-2007, 06:03 PM
That quote doesn't bother me that much. There's more to life than tennis and maybe he's equally concerned with those things.

I agree. I really don't think Sam Q is going to care less whether some American tennis fan looking for bragging rights on an internet forum is losing hope in him... he'll be too busy enjoying life and success at his own pace.
Meanwhile the insanely hungrey Roddick can look forward to a slamless future.

Rhino
08-13-2007, 06:07 PM
But I bet France wishes they were us!
Edit: Actually, France probably wishes they were Spain the last 3 years! ;)

I can absolutely guarantee you that France does not even for one second wish they were America.

saram
08-13-2007, 06:08 PM
I can absolutely guarantee you that France does not even for one second wish they were America.

no, we pretty much ticked them off in more ways than one....

saram
08-13-2007, 06:08 PM
:) I agree. I really don't think Sam Q is going to care less whether some American tennis fan looking for bragging rights on an internet forum is losing hope in him... he'll be too busy enjoying life and success at his own pace.
Meanwhile the insanely hungrey Roddick can look forward to a slamless future.

I will agree, because he has not changed since '03...

hey, that rhymes!

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 06:09 PM
And every year the French go, "He is on chemicals." And I'm going, "It's chemotherapy, you little toad suckers." "Okay, he has one testicle, he's aerodynamic. Everyone, cut off your balls. You'll be quicker. Do it. Don't be afraid."

Robin Williams

rrhstennis
08-13-2007, 06:11 PM
LOL at the Robin Williams quote!

Yes, I'm well aware France doesn't want to be America. I was only referring to tennis, in which they're starving for a champ even on Roddick's level ;)

bank5
08-13-2007, 06:15 PM
It is easy--look at our school systems. Our tennis courts deteriorate every year. Coaches are hard as can be to come by. Schools do not want to fund tennis. There are no concessions to be made from tennis, etc.

American schools want football, baseball, basketball, and wrestling. They want anything that will profit. No school can profit via tennis--only lose money as they have to pay for travel, coaches, etc. Schools make money from packed stadiums selling tickets, hotdogs, burgers, popcorn and soda.

None of the schools or programs that surround schools prior to high-school offer tennis. Kids do not learn about tennis until they enter high-school. Only those that have parents that play are shown the in's and out's of tennis.

Communities will always build a bigger gymnasium, football field, baseball field, etc, with tax dollars. We have been trying for years to improve our tennis facilities in town and the only grants we can get are via the USTA.

No one outside of the USTA has funded tennis in our community in over five years...

THAT...is the demise of American tennis...NO ONE CARES.

I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

bank5
08-13-2007, 06:21 PM
And every year the French go, "He is on chemicals." And I'm going, "It's chemotherapy, you little toad suckers." "Okay, he has one testicle, he's aerodynamic. Everyone, cut off your balls. You'll be quicker. Do it. Don't be afraid."

Robin Williams

hahahaha....that's awesome. I think that's the funniest thing I've read on here. Is that on YouTube?

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 06:22 PM
hahahaha....that's awesome. I think that's the funniest thing I've read on here. Is that on YouTube?

I think it probably is but I just love this quote about the French. LOL!

Rhino
08-13-2007, 06:24 PM
LOL at the Robin Williams quote!

Yes, I'm well aware France doesn't want to be America. I was only referring to tennis, in which they're starving for a champ even on Roddick's level ;)

Gasquet humiliated Roddick at Wimbledon and will be top 10 soon. France has 7 men inside the top 50 to only 2 Americans (who are both on their way down).

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 06:28 PM
I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

Ok their is a huge difference in how other countries run their tennis programs compared to ours. Yes high school and college tennis are bigger than anywhere else in the world. But they do it differently. For example, say France has an up and coming junior what would they do. They would automatically send him to their academy that they have for all promising juniors and they would get a scholarship as well to make it less expensive for the family. We don't have that in the US. Not even close. It is getting better. But we are still a long way off. Say if a Frenchman wanted to play tennis that had gone to the academy but wasn't good enough to go pro, where would he go? He of course comes to America to go to college. He will get a full ride to play tennis at a four year university. He will be better than 80 percent of the Americans he plays because he went to an academy when he was 12 or 13. I am speaking from experience. I played all four years in college and that was how it was.

saram
08-13-2007, 06:29 PM
I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

Yes, but who takes the kids to public courts when they are three or four years old? Kids in America do not get a racket in their hand until high-school unless they are outside of the norm and have parents that love the game. American parents are so fat, lazy, etc., that taking their child to a public court to hit a few would just suck. A parent would have to miss Survivor 8 or Lost to head to the courts with their child.

My point is that within our school systems, there is no emphasis on tennis. Not even soccer, and soccer is the #1 sport in the world.

saram
08-13-2007, 06:30 PM
Ok their is a huge difference in how other countries run their tennis programs compared to ours. Yes high school and college tennis are bigger than anywhere else in the world. But they do it differently. For example, say France has an up and coming junior what would they do. They would automatically send him to their academy that they have for all promising juniors and they would get a scholarship as well to make it less expensive for the family. We don't have that in the US. Not even close. It is getting better. But we are still a long way off. Say if a Frenchman wanted to play tennis that had gone to the academy but wasn't good enough to go pro, where would he go? He of course comes to America to go to college. He will get a full ride to play tennis at a four year university. He will be better than 80 percent of the Americans he plays because he went to an academy when he was 12 or 13. I am speaking from experience. I played all four years in college and that was how it was.

Spoken so well....

Jonny S&V
08-13-2007, 06:30 PM
I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

That is true, however, if you get kids who are mainly going to mainstream sports (such as Baseball, Basketball and Football), you get mostly non-athletic kids (at least where I live) that don't have a lot of talent. The only hope I think we have is to raise our kids in the future playing soccer and tennis. I don't know what it is about those 2 that intertwines them, but even at the high school level, a lot of good tennis players play soccer too (for example, 7/10 of my top 10 at school play soccer in the fall and tennis in the spring, 5/6 of the top 10, me being the only one who doesn't). I also find that kids that play tennis are usually pushed by their parents, which in turn makes them want to be their own individuals and go a different path. I picked up tennis at a older age for a kid (13), but I have the drive to play because I know that I picked up the sport on my own, and my parents could care less what I do (which is both a good thing ($), and a bad thing (grades)).

saram
08-13-2007, 06:32 PM
That is true, however, if you get kids who are mainly going to mainstream sports (such as Baseball, Basketball and Football), you get mostly non-athletic kids (at least where I live) that don't have a lot of talent. The only hope I think we have is to raise our kids in the future playing soccer and tennis. I don't know what it is about those 2 that intertwines them, but even at the high school level, a lot of good tennis players play soccer too (for example, 7/10 of my top 10 at school play soccer in the fall and tennis in the spring, 5/6 of the top 10, me being the only one who doesn't). I also find that kids that play tennis are usually pushed by their parents, which in turn makes them want to be their own individuals and go a different path. I picked up tennis at a older age for a kid (13), but I have the drive to play because I know that I picked up the sport on my own, and my parents could care less what I do (which is both a good thing ($), and a bad thing (grades)).


another great example...

I mean that in a positive way....

pro_staff
08-13-2007, 06:32 PM
I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

I think bank5 is on the right track here. I think the reason that young Americans don't have the desire it takes to succeed is because of the easy accessibility of public tennis courts. For us, we could walk to the courts, hit for 30 minutes and if we think we're having a bad day, we go home and come back tomorrow. If it's difficult to get on a tennis court, you are more likely to try harder and get the most out of the limited time you have on the court.

bank5
08-13-2007, 06:42 PM
American parents are so fat, lazy, etc., that taking their child to a public court to hit a few would just suck. A parent would have to miss Survivor 8 or Lost to head to the courts with their child.


That's sort of the point I was trying to make in my original post.


I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.

If Sam Querrey grew up in Serbia with Djokovic I bet he'd have a much different attitude. Djokovic has made it a goal since he was 7 to become #1 and he's definitely heading in the right direction.

ScovilleJenkins
08-13-2007, 06:49 PM
as one of my coaches said, a tennis racket is a foreign tennis player's weapon of liberation

Frenchie
08-13-2007, 07:01 PM
I guess it's easier to lose interest when you're driving your Mom's Porche growing up compared to the kid who goes to the court to get away from a war going on in his backyard.

Oh please... Doesn't get more schmaltzy or melodramatic than that does it? I can't think of one professional tennis player who was raised anywhere near a war. Djokovic was up in the mountains during the 3 year Bosnian War and Ljubicic promptly relocated when fighting broke out.

On the other hand, the Williams Sisters faced constant drive-by gang shootings during their youth training. One such shooting killed their sister for god's sake! Seems to me it's the American tennis champions that have a war in their backyard. Please avoid such sweeping cultural generalizations in the future.

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 07:04 PM
Oh please... Doesn't get more schmaltzy or melodramatic than that does it? I can't think of one professional tennis player who was raised anywhere near a war. Djokovic was up in the mountains during the 3 year Bosnian War and Ljubicic promptly relocated when fighting broke out.

On the other hand, the Williams Sisters faced constant drive-by gang shootings during their youth training. One such shooting killed their sister for god's sake! Seems to me it's the American tennis champions that have a war in their backyard. Please avoid such sweeping cultural generalizations in the future.

You have no idea what you are talking about. As I recall Ljub had a gun held to his head and Djoker had to relocate to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED! You need to think before you type.

bank5
08-13-2007, 07:18 PM
Oh please... Doesn't get more schmaltzy or melodramatic than that does it? I can't think of one professional tennis player who was raised anywhere near a war. Djokovic was up in the mountains during the 3 year Bosnian War and Ljubicic promptly relocated when fighting broke out.


I was exaggerating but I guess you didn't pick up on it. I don't think too many people have wars in their "backyards".

J-man
08-13-2007, 07:38 PM
Is anyone else bothered by this quote by Sam Querrey in Tennis Magazine:



I stopped reading the article and pretty much lost hope in the guy after reading that quote.

I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.I agree that he should be working hard now. But he is a young guy. He's got time to improve and mature and I'm sure he will.

By the way as a sidenote Querrey doesn't drive a Porsche. He drives an old beater.

uc3
08-13-2007, 08:37 PM
I agree that he should be working hard now. But he is a young guy. He's got time to improve and mature and I'm sure he will.

By the way as a sidenote Querrey doesn't drive a Porsche. He drives an old beater.

Tennis Magazine September 2007 disagrees with you.

tangerine
08-13-2007, 08:53 PM
I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.
I'm more bothered by your quote that generalizes 300 million hard-working people than by anything Sam Querrey said.

Eating twinkies all day, speak for yourself.

tennispro11
08-13-2007, 08:56 PM
I'm more bothered by your quote that generalizes 300 million hard-working people than by anything Sam Querrey said.

Eating twinkies all day, speak for yourself.

He said "kids" dude. Not 300 million hard working Americans. LOL! But you can be offended if you want. If you think our youth work that hard today then so be it. But you are wrong. Very wrong.

Frenchie
08-13-2007, 10:06 PM
You have no idea what you are talking about. As I recall Ljub had a gun held to his head and Djoker had to relocate to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED! You need to think before you type.

Looks like we have another sensationalist on our hands, ladies and gentleman! Without any sources, you "recalled" some pretty outrageous facts regarding the childhoods of Djokovic and Ljubicic. First off, Srdjan and Dijana Djokovic have owned a pizzeria and pancake restaurant on a mountain in Serbia for the last 15 years. They never "relocated to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED!" as you so passionately put it.

Now about Ljubicic, he was the one who had to "relocate to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED!" He grew up in a very war-torn environment. Many of his friends were killed and he had to endure a 3 day trip on planes and buses to escape to Croatia. However, I can found no evidence of anyone pointing a gun at him. Nice try, though.

Noveson
08-13-2007, 10:14 PM
Gasquet humiliated Roddick at Wimbledon and will be top 10 soon. France has 7 men inside the top 50 to only 2 Americans (who are both on their way down).

Lol nice how you stretched that out. I hate people who hate America;) What would it be like if you would've said France has 0 men in the top 10 while America has 2?

avmoghe
08-13-2007, 10:16 PM
That quote doesn't bother me that much. There's more to life than tennis and maybe he's equally concerned with those things.

Exactly! I hate this foolish idea that every professional player must devote their lives to the sport. For once, I just want to see some professional skip (something like) the Wimbledon final because his favorite soccer team was playing on tv.. or something like that...Hell.. even better... Federer should just tell Wimbledon to f--k off on final's morning because he wants to stay in bed with Mirka...(To top it all off, he can ask them to send the runner up check and trophy through mail)

I want some professional to literally take a **** on the sport and tell everyone to STFU and stop taking themselves too seriously...I want some professional to come out an say "I play just to make money, and pay my bills...I don't really care about maximizing my tennis ability, nor do I care about any of these ******** fans..."

Why is there this obsession with being the best? Can you simply not play to make a living and then go and enjoy life without tennis? Tennis (or any other sport) is NOT life...

I want to give my best wishes to Kim Clijsters.. and my middle finger to all you a-holes who say she should not have quit.

Okay.. I'll stop babbling ... :)

Texas21
08-13-2007, 10:37 PM
Eh, all the comments about the youth today is unsettling. There may be more overweight children, but those overweight children are the ones who stay at home all day, and get A's. They succeed in the measurement of intelligence.

You can't just measure all of America's youth on their athletic ability. America has forced the youth to be extremely proficient in at least one thing, and thus, the ones that have chosen to work hard in school, are far more intelligent than previous generations. The ones that focus on sports, are far better than previous generations. You don't get anywhere in life being the jack of all trades, you have to be good at something.

Rhino
08-14-2007, 03:39 AM
Lol nice how you stretched that out. I hate people who hate America;) What would it be like if you would've said France has 0 men in the top 10 while America has 2?

I don't hate America (whoa paranoia), I couldn't care less, I'm just saying that i don't think France would like to be them (in tennis terms) because I think France has a more promising tennis future right now. If Roddick doesn't perform well at Cincy or the US Open his ranking is toast.

jrstrat
08-14-2007, 04:39 AM
If Roddick doesn't perform well at Cincy or the US Open his ranking is toast.

If Roddick does not perform well in Cincy or the US Open, he will more than likely drop from #4 to #5 with only Davydenko passing him. Robredo, Gonzo, or Gasquet potentially could pass him but it is very unlikely especially based on all 3's performance in Montreal.

johnkidd
08-14-2007, 04:46 AM
I strongly disagree with this. School sports (including tennis) are FAR bigger in the US than any other country. Not only that, but on the college level there's even a bigger gap (especially with tennis).

America also has a lot more public tennis courts than other countries. I was talking to a guy from England the other day and he said that golf is bigger than tennis over there because tennis is too expensive (there aren't any public courts). I played a guy from Japan last week and he said you have to drive over an hour just to get to a private court over there. Within a half hour from where I live there's over 100 courts.

As far as access to courts and playing in schools, Americans have the biggest advantage in the world.

We have a lot of public courts but you have to look far and wide to find good quality ones.

predrag
08-14-2007, 04:48 AM
It is easy--look at our school systems. Our tennis courts deteriorate every year.

Incredible but true. As bad as hard courts are for players and players' development,
one good thing about them was that they are easy to maintain.
However, there is still some maintenance to be done.
Club that I belong to resurfaced outdoor courts this year. And they are still full of cracks and sloping.
If they replaced them with Harthru, it would have been better in thousand more ways :(

Coaches are hard as can be to come by.

Coaches are not that hard to come by, but good coaches are.
I moved to Ann Arbor 5 months ago. I was surprised how strong adult tennis is, and
in the same time, how terrible junior tennis is. The only good thing was that I was able to
dedicate more time to my tennis playing son, so he is actually improving.


[snip]
No one outside of the USTA has funded tennis in our community in over five years...

Frankly, USTA is full of lazy a**es who have no clue how to do anything about tennis.
Tournaments are organized poorly, parents are not helped in any way.
There is no help from USTA, whatsoever.
The only thing that USTA does is try to look good and make money.



THAT...is the demise of American tennis...NO ONE CARES.
Yes, no one cares because it is not cash cow as golf is.

Regards, Predrag

johnkidd
08-14-2007, 04:51 AM
Wasn't Amer Delic's family the ones who fled to the US because of the wars?

bank5
08-14-2007, 05:00 AM
I'm more bothered by your quote that generalizes 300 million hard-working people than by anything Sam Querrey said.

Eating twinkies all day, speak for yourself.

I said "too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies" not every single American is Eating twinkies all day.

I guess people on here take things very literally and take it like you're making a generalization about everyone.

I realize there's tons of hard working American kids and there always will be. I also realize that kids are driven towards different things, some towards academics, some athletics, band, art and whatever else.

rrhstennis
08-14-2007, 07:40 AM
You know you make a good point Rhino! France has a lot of potential right now. In the last couple dozen years, France has exactly 0 grand slams (unless I forgot one.) while America has too many to count, which is what I was thinking of, but at the moment... well, it doesn't look like either is getting any, but Gasquet is a lot more likely to get one at some point than Roddick getting another or Blake, in my opinion. Now players like Isner and Querrey also have potential if they get hungrier and help themselves develop... so... it's hard to say.

But yeah, France is actually looking decent. It's been a while, I'm sure they're happier now than in a long time.

coloskier
08-14-2007, 08:17 AM
It is easy--look at our school systems. Our tennis courts deteriorate every year. Coaches are hard as can be to come by. Schools do not want to fund tennis. There are no concessions to be made from tennis, etc.

American schools want football, baseball, basketball, and wrestling. They want anything that will profit. No school can profit via tennis--only lose money as they have to pay for travel, coaches, etc. Schools make money from packed stadiums selling tickets, hotdogs, burgers, popcorn and soda.

None of the schools or programs that surround schools prior to high-school offer tennis. Kids do not learn about tennis until they enter high-school. Only those that have parents that play are shown the in's and out's of tennis.

Communities will always build a bigger gymnasium, football field, baseball field, etc, with tax dollars. We have been trying for years to improve our tennis facilities in town and the only grants we can get are via the USTA.

No one outside of the USTA has funded tennis in our community in over five years...

THAT...is the demise of American tennis...NO ONE CARES.

I can guarantee that NONE of the European (Russian, French, Spanish, Swiss) players got their tennis from a "School" background. they all came through tennis camps, just like the Americans are now starting to do. Every American has come from Bolleteri or Evert or Newcombe or some other tennis factory, just like the Europeans. What the Americans do not have is the European work ethic. The only reason Roddick has gotten as far as he has is that he has a very strong work ethic and HATES to lose. Agassi, McEnroe, Sampras, all hated to lose so much that it consumed them. Right now we have no other Americans who fit that category, and until we do, we will be middle of the road when it comes to international tennis. Blake, Querrey... they don't have the fire that it takes. Hewitt would be the best example of this. While he has average strokes, his desire to win pulls him through a lot of matches that he should lose if you just compared ability.

dennis10is
08-14-2007, 09:05 AM
Once anything is not fun, you lose interest--including tennis. If this is what Querrey needs to progress at his rate--then so be it.

We as fans possess no right to push a player to do anything they want. American tennis sucks--face it....I have.

I like Sam, he's a real person and his family and him did not approach tennis as if it was their dream. They already have the American dream. If he becomes a successful tennis pro, that's nice but not desperate.

I have to respect and feel good about a family that is balanced. We fans enjoyed the absoluate dedication of a few people but really, professional tennis is about people spending 24/7 of theirs lives hitting a fuzzy yellow ball all over the world and hopefully get enough people to watch it while paying for it.

It is a job, a profession, and they require the fans to dole out money one way or another. There are these professional eaters, they get paid eating hot dogs or pizza, whatever. Would you think less of a person if they say, I'm not going to dedicate my entire life to figuring out how to stuff one more Nathans hot dog down my throat?

Tennis is hitting a fuzzy yellow ball back and forth across a net into a box.

The US is a rich country with many opportunities for success. Let the other countries, not as lucky have their moments.

tennispro11
08-14-2007, 09:10 AM
Looks like we have another sensationalist on our hands, ladies and gentleman! Without any sources, you "recalled" some pretty outrageous facts regarding the childhoods of Djokovic and Ljubicic. First off, Srdjan and Dijana Djokovic have owned a pizzeria and pancake restaurant on a mountain in Serbia for the last 15 years. They never "relocated to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED!" as you so passionately put it.

Now about Ljubicic, he was the one who had to "relocate to another COUNTRY so his whole FAMILY woudn't be KILLED!" He grew up in a very war-torn environment. Many of his friends were killed and he had to endure a 3 day trip on planes and buses to escape to Croatia. However, I can found no evidence of anyone pointing a gun at him. Nice try, though.

Well good job on the research Frenchie. You seem to know how to type something in for Google to search. I just wanted to say something that would get a response out of you because you seem to know pretty much everything. I guess I will stop posting and let you take over now. LOL! For the record not a sensationalist. Just a guy who wanted to **** you off. :)

Frenchie
08-14-2007, 09:38 AM
I just wanted to say something that would get a response out of you because you seem to know pretty much everything. I guess I will stop posting and let you take over now. Just a guy who wanted to **** you off.

Well that's an interesting way of saving face.... "I posted something false just so I could **** you off."

You really are one of life's winners aren't you? You didn't **** me off, you just made yourself look stupid.

ShooterMcMarco
08-14-2007, 09:42 AM
At least he has a sense of self-awareness.

tennispro11
08-14-2007, 10:14 AM
[QUOTE=Frenchie;1665030]Well that's an interesting way of saving face

You really are one of life's winners aren't you?

.................LOL...................I do win, alot. Don't you?

anchorsteamer
08-14-2007, 01:21 PM
Well good job on the research Frenchie. You seem to know how to type something in for Google to search. I just wanted to say something that would get a response out of you because you seem to know pretty much everything. I guess I will stop posting and let you take over now. LOL! For the record not a sensationalist. Just a guy who wanted to **** you off. :)

Your an idiot

tennispro11
08-14-2007, 01:27 PM
Your an idiot

Thanks, I try. :)

Richie Rich
08-14-2007, 01:35 PM
.................LOL...................I do win, alot. Don't you?

did you happen to get a degree when you went to college?

tennispro11
08-14-2007, 01:39 PM
did you happen to get a degree when you went to college?

Yeah, why? I can't have a little fun on here? Besides at least I don't go into attack mode when a lady disagrees with me. People take these forums soooooo seriously, it is really, really hilarious. :)

Richie Rich
08-14-2007, 03:11 PM
Yeah, why? I can't have a little fun on here? Besides at least I don't go into attack mode when a lady disagrees with me. People take these forums soooooo seriously, it is really, really hilarious. :)

no reason. what was the degree in? just curious.

with regards to the forums - i have to agree with you 100% as there are definitely more important things in life. nothing should be taken too seriously.

Moose Malloy
08-14-2007, 03:13 PM
Exactly! I hate this foolish idea that every professional player must devote their lives to the sport. For once, I just want to see some professional skip (something like) the Wimbledon final because his favorite soccer team was playing on tv..

last year at wimbledon, nalbandian requested his match be put first on so he could see argentina play. they obliged, putting him on an outer court, where he lost in straight sets, leaving him plenty of time to enjoy the game.

someone also posted here that he chose not to defend his title in estoril this year because he wanted to attend car racing instead.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=130659&page=2

Richie Rich
08-14-2007, 03:17 PM
last year at wimbledon, nalbandian requested his match be put first on so he could see argentina play. they obliged, putting him on an outer court, where he lost in straight sets, leaving him plenty of time to enjoy the game.

someone also posted here that he chose not to defend his title in estoril this year because he wanted to attend a soccer tournament instead.

nalbandian is somewhat of an exception. tennis is fourth on his priority list after eating, football, music.

Challenger
08-14-2007, 03:29 PM
I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.

Wow. Just wow. This just goes to show your level of ignorance.

tennispro11
08-14-2007, 04:12 PM
no reason. what was the degree in? just curious.

with regards to the forums - i have to agree with you 100% as there are definitely more important things in life. nothing should be taken too seriously.

Coaching/Physical Fitness.

bank5
08-14-2007, 04:41 PM
Wow. Just wow. This just goes to show your level of ignorance.

You took the quote way too literally. Didn't mean for it to offend anyone, I was just trying to make a point across without writing a thesis on it.

Challenger, why do you a guy like Djokovic has been determined to be #1 in the world since he was 7 and a guy like Querrey is perfectly happy around 80? (not that there's anything wrong with that, I'd be absolutely thrilled if I was #80 in the world). I think a lot has to do with their upbringing.

Also, why do you think the US dominated tennis in the 90's but has been going downhill since?

Btw, the reason why I ask questions like this is because I want to hear people's opinion and figure out the answer (which is the complete opposite of ignorance).

35ft6
08-14-2007, 05:05 PM
You took the quote way too literally. Didn't mean for it to offend anyone, I was just trying to make a point across without writing a thesis on it.

Challenger, why do you a guy like Djokovic has been determined to be #1 in the world since he was 7 and a guy like Querrey is perfectly happy around 80? (not that there's anything wrong with that, I'd be absolutely thrilled if I was #80 in the world). I think a lot has to do with their upbringing. Then why do a lot of top players, from McEnroe, to Roddick, to Sampras come from relatively cushy backgrounds? Venus and Serena training in Compton hasn't reached mythical status because poor people in America play competitive tennis in huge numbers.Also, why do you think the US dominated tennis in the 90's but has been going downhill since? First you say that people in other countries have more desire than the USA, than you cite American players of the 90's as an example of players with hunger. What happened in the USA over the past fifteen years to diminish the hunger of our players? In your opinion. Also, what happened in Sweden? And what happened in Spain and Argentina in the last 90's to now to account for their "hunger?"

I think your making a common cause-and-effect mistake. You seem to be assuming that if somebody is getting good results, it's because they want it more. But I don't see how this could be true or proven to be true. I'm sure lots of guys who are almost dead broke playing the challengers want it way more than the multi-millionaires in the top ten, but they simply don't have the innate physical ability. In life, it's not all about desire. How tall you're born, how fast you are, how calm you stay under pressure, your stroke mechanics, they are all as important and probably way more so.

Does Federer want it more than everybody? If so, why is the he the only Swiss player who wants it? What's wrong with the rest of Switzerland?

Look America was spoiled by the great generation of tennis players in the history of tennis (right?). Three number 1 players, including one who's arguably the greatest ever, plus the only man in the open era to win all four slams, and Michael Chang, who was one win away from number 1 several times. This is a freak thing. You can't manufacture results like that. You can almost interpret Querrey's comments as a very smart way of minimizing the distraction of unreasonable expectations, or preemptively blocking out the people who expect him to be top 10 by some arbitrary date they made up. Who needs that?

dukemunson
08-15-2007, 01:05 AM
Venus and Serena training in Compton hasn't reached mythical status because poor people in America play competitive tennis in huge numbers.

Venus and Serena did the majority of their training at an academy in Florida...doesnt quite have the ring of Compton though...

tennispro11: worthless posts..."I made it up to get a rise out of you"...pretty weak...

35ft6
08-15-2007, 01:19 AM
Venus and Serena did the majority of their training at an academy in Florida...doesnt quite have the ring of Compton though.... Yeah, but how did they get that scholarship?

norcal
08-15-2007, 06:59 AM
Then why do a lot of top players, from McEnroe, to Roddick, to Sampras come from relatively cushy backgrounds? Venus and Serena training in Compton hasn't reached mythical status because poor people in America play competitive tennis in huge numbers. First you say that people in other countries have more desire than the USA, than you cite American players of the 90's as an example of players with hunger. What happened in the USA over the past fifteen years to diminish the hunger of our players? In your opinion. Also, what happened in Sweden? And what happened in Spain and Argentina in the last 90's to now to account for their "hunger?"

I think your making a common cause-and-effect mistake. You seem to be assuming that if somebody is getting good results, it's because they want it more. But I don't see how this could be true or proven to be true. I'm sure lots of guys who are almost dead broke playing the challengers want it way more than the multi-millionaires in the top ten, but they simply don't have the innate physical ability. In life, it's not all about desire. How tall you're born, how fast you are, how calm you stay under pressure, your stroke mechanics, they are all as important and probably way more so.

Does Federer want it more than everybody? If so, why is the he the only Swiss player who wants it? What's wrong with the rest of Switzerland?

Look America was spoiled by the great generation of tennis players in the history of tennis (right?). Three number 1 players, including one who's arguably the greatest ever, plus the only man in the open era to win all four slams, and Michael Chang, who was one win away from number 1 several times. This is a freak thing. You can't manufacture results like that. You can almost interpret Querrey's comments as a very smart way of minimizing the distraction of unreasonable expectations, or preemptively blocking out the people who expect him to be top 10 by some arbitrary date they made up. Who needs that?

Great post.

Rhino
08-23-2007, 03:32 PM
If Roddick does not perform well in Cincy or the US Open, he will more than likely drop from #4 to #5 with only Davydenko passing him. Robredo, Gonzo, or Gasquet potentially could pass him but it is very unlikely especially based on all 3's performance in Montreal.

Well lets say Karlovic beats him in the third round - definitely not out of the question based on Roddicks performance at Cincy - he would lose 625 ranking points. Blake and Davydenko seem to have the easiest of the four quarters, and should both meet each other in the quarterfinals (with Haas being their biggest threat). Gonzalez is only defending a third round defeat (so is Djokovic by the way) and should make it to the quarters (check his draw, he's got Safin...?), where he may meet Nadal, and would then at least gain 225 points. This would put Gonzo ahead of Roddick and Blake, and should Blake actually beat Davydenko Roddick would then drop to number 7. Just a thought :)

edmondsm
08-23-2007, 03:41 PM
Is anyone else bothered by this quote by Sam Querrey in Tennis Magazine:



I stopped reading the article and pretty much lost hope in the guy after reading that quote.

I think the biggest problem with American tennis is too many kids are playing video games and eating twinkies (or driving their parent's porche) while kids in other countries are growing up poor with nothing but a tennis racquet and work ethic.

ROFLAMO. What in God's name are you smoking? Growing up poor? You got to be kidding. Tennis is a rich kid sport the world round. You think what makes Fed good is that he had to hit serves and forehands to feed his starving family or something. You are ridiculous.

I would like to see more guys with Sam's attitude. Being light hearted and having fun on the court often leads to success. There are so many young athletes that have to much pressure heaped onto them and they implode.

America turns out amazing athletes. The recent downswing in American tennis is just a product of the globalization of the sport. The same reason that perenial tennis powers like Sweden and Australia are stuggling as well.