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UHCoog27
08-20-2007, 06:03 AM
For the past 6 years, I played with a Wilson 6.1 (95 si) strung with Prince Synthetic Duraflex 16 at 65 lbs. With those specs, strings would last me a week (playing 5 days a week).

Now, I'm playing with a Yonex RDS 001 (90 si) strung with the same Prince Synthetic Duraflex 16 at the same 65 lbs. After three string jobs, I've yet to make it past 20 minutes of hitting.

My question. Can a change in racket really make that much of a difference in string durability?

Valjean
08-20-2007, 07:21 AM
The short answer is yes, it can. To determine the true cause (there can be others, too), though, starts with this question: where is it breaking? And, what conditions are you playing under? How are you storing it, and does that make a contribution? Have you changed your game? Has there been a change in the people you hit with? Do you play more singles now? Etc.

One simple change that should help right away with what you have in there is to install string savers.

UHCoog27
08-20-2007, 07:59 AM
It's breaking on a main at the top of the racket. Nothing has changed (strings, tension, style of play, amount of play) but the racket. And this has been different packets of string, so it's not coming off a bad reel or anything.

I hit pretty hard with a good amount of topspin, but to get 20 minutes out of a stringing seems ridiculous to me.

Gmedlo
08-20-2007, 08:33 AM
It's breaking on a main at the top of the racket. Nothing has changed (strings, tension, style of play, amount of play) but the racket. And this has been different packets of string, so it's not coming off a bad reel or anything.

I hit pretty hard with a good amount of topspin, but to get 20 minutes out of a stringing seems ridiculous to me.

Your aren't breaking the strings "regularly", per say, but you are shearing them. This usually happens in polyester, but with how high you are stringing your PSGD and with the stiff nature of the string, it can happen.

It might have something to due with the spacing between the last cross (top) and the frame on the yonex. But I've never hit with the RDS 001 mid, only the MP, so I couldn't say.

Try stringing lower or using a softer string.

Valjean
08-20-2007, 08:38 AM
There is a difference in the pattern and number of crosses for you but probably not enough to account for it. The tension range is actually higher for the Yonex, putting your 65 lbs. tension within it now. You haven't mentioned the climate yet. What about the temp and humidity where you are? That alone could do it too, in this summer heat wave we've all been undergoing.

Best test is to install those string savers now; let's see what that does.

UHCoog27
08-20-2007, 08:50 AM
I live in Houston, so it's very hot and very humid, but I've always lived here. Store my rackets in the AC when I'm not playing.

I'm going to switch to a 15 gauge nylon and try the string savers.

jonolau
08-20-2007, 08:54 AM
I live in Houston, so it's very hot and very humid, but I've always lived here. Store my rackets in the AC when I'm not playing.

I'm going to switch to a 15 gauge nylon and try the string savers.

I'm living in Singapore which is just as hot and humid, so I highly doubt that weather will affect it that significantly.

Chances are that your grommets might be worn out and the string is rubbing against the frame causing it to shear through in no time at all. How old is the Yonex?

UHCoog27
08-20-2007, 09:09 AM
The racket is only a week old.

Puma
08-20-2007, 10:21 AM
I had the same problems with PSGD 16 ga in the Wilson 90 @ about 57 to 60 lbs. For me the prince plays crisp and I like that feel. But, the duraflex just wouldnt hold up.

I have my own stringing machine. So, I began trying different strings with a little difference in tensions. This is what I found. This ain't scientific but this is what I remember.

fewer lbs + string savers = more durability

15ga string = bad feel

Goosen Micro = cheap and longer lasting than PSGD

Buying your own stringing machine = force you to find a string and tension that works because it is one thing to pay someone while it is a completely different thing to "find the time" to restring.

gjoc
08-20-2007, 10:52 AM
For the past 6 years, I played with a Wilson 6.1 (95 si) strung with Prince Synthetic Duraflex 16 at 65 lbs. With those specs, strings would last me a week (playing 5 days a week).

Now, I'm playing with a Yonex RDS 001 (90 si) strung with the same Prince Synthetic Duraflex 16 at the same 65 lbs. After three string jobs, I've yet to make it past 20 minutes of hitting.

My question. Can a change in racket really make that much of a difference in string durability?

A couple of things occur to me on this...

Since the head size on your new racquet is a bit smaller, albeit a different shape, you probably need to reduce the tension a few pounds to get the same stiffness as before. In other words, your strings now are unintentionally tighter than before, which obviously could help them to shear.

Also, with the smaller head size, you could be just mishitting both more and more often than before.

Lastly, because your racquet is new, the grommets arenít yet flared the way they will be after time, which could be helping to shear the string.

They make a tool that can flare the grommets, but I donít think TW sells it. The tool looks like this:

http://206.210.94.83/assets/product_full/MFI_largev3.jpg

http://206.210.94.83/assets/product_thumb/MFI_thumb.jpg

EDIT: You can obviously just use an awl to flare/widen out the stringbed end of the grommets too, you donít have to buy the special tool for that.

gjoc
08-20-2007, 11:02 AM
Oh, I should have asked, what is the length of the longest two main strings in the old racquet and in the new racquet? Measure pretty accurately.

Divide the new, shorter length by the old, longer length, then multiply that times the old tension (65) to calculate what your new tension should be for the same stiffness. What number does that give you?

Valjean
08-20-2007, 03:34 PM
This formula avoids the fact that the tension ranges for the two racquets differ, and that, as said, 65 is already "lower" in terms of what the Yonex's range is.

gjoc
08-20-2007, 04:26 PM
This formula avoids the fact that the tension ranges for the two racquets differ, and that, as said, 65 is already "lower" in terms of what the Yonex's range is.

Huh? :confused:

65 is the max (i.e., the same 100% of max) for both, no?

Wilson 95 in≤ tension range is 55-65 lbs.

Yonex 90 in≤ tension range is 50-65 lbs.

(Yonex 98 in≤ tension range is 55-65 lbs.)

Since the larger Yonex is 55-65, and the minimum for the smaller Yonex is 50 (5 lbs. less), it would seem that the range for the smaller Yonex that would be comparable to both the larger Yonex and the Wilson, as far as feel/playability would be, as one might expect, 50-60.

The fact that Yonex permits the smaller one to be strung above and beyond 60 just means that the structural integrity of the racquet permits that, for any players who prefer it, not that itís the same feel.

My guess is that the ratio of the string lengths will indicate he wants something like 62 or 63.

In any event, I think his main problem is the grommets not being flared out yet, since he indicated the racquet is only a week old.

Valjean
08-20-2007, 07:12 PM
I got the wrong specs for the PS 6.1, somehow; my bad.