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12345
08-21-2007, 07:53 AM
When the pros hit, the end up off the ground because they transfered their weight on their shot right. How do their transfer their weight so much that they end up off the ground.

predrag
08-21-2007, 09:01 AM
When the pros hit, the end up off the ground because they transfered their weight on their shot right. How do their transfer their weight so much that they end up off the ground.

Getting airborne is not weight transfer. It is load and unload.
One should get down on a ball so quads are loaded, and then
the ball is hit, legs push off and eventually you get off the ground.

Getting airborne should not be purpose but the consequence.

Regards, Predrag

habib
08-21-2007, 09:01 AM
When the pros hit, the end up off the ground because they transfered their weight on their shot right. How do their transfer their weight so much that they end up off the ground.

It's not that they transfer their weight that causes them to come off the ground, exactly. It's the leg drive they generate to uncoil their bodies.

DarkTennis
08-22-2007, 09:22 PM
i was wondering how they get into position so accrurately and quick to get the timing of transfer weight or load or unload

habib
08-23-2007, 08:53 AM
i was wondering how they get into position so accrurately and quick to get the timing of transfer weight or load or unload

This is why footwork is so damn important in this game.

TheFonz
08-23-2007, 10:26 AM
I don't recommend this tactic. Pro's get to practice much more than most people and have time to groove this shot. I see a lot of average players try to copy this and it leads to increased errors or slow recovery for the next shot. Try and keep both feet on the ground. Most strokes should have a much lower base than what you see most players use at your local courts.

At our acadamy, we stress that you should hit your forehand open off of the back foot and only shift your weight to the non-dominate side as a way to recover and regain balance for the next shot.

mrcalon
08-23-2007, 10:40 AM
Unloading is the same thing as jumping.

If you've ever played basketball, you know there's a difference between using your legs to power a jumpshot, and alternatively jumping then releasing the ball as you're on the way down. With the forehand you want to do the former. You can explode (ie - jump)then swing before that power is lost.

TheFonz
08-23-2007, 10:43 AM
Unloading is the same thing as jumping.

If you've ever played basketball, you know there's a difference between using your legs to power a jumpshot, and alternatively jumping then releasing the ball as you're on the way down. With the forehand you want to do the former. You can explode (ie - jump)then swing before that power is lost.

no. unloading is not the same thing as jumping. Unloading means that you have transfered your weight to a different leg. This does not mean that you have to jump to the other leg. Jumping leads to instability of the racquet and balance.

mrcalon
08-23-2007, 10:51 AM
no. unloading is not the same thing as jumping. Unloading means that you have transfered your weight to a different leg. This does not mean that you have to jump to the other leg. Jumping leads to instability of the racquet and balance.

Can you describe this "unloading" more vividly, or maybe with pictures?

mrcalon
08-23-2007, 11:02 AM
Can you describe this "unloading" more vividly, or maybe with pictures?

Never mind I think i get what you're saying now.

bad_call
08-23-2007, 11:02 AM
an example of unloading is when a bear poops in the woods....

sorry i couldn't help myself. :p

mrcalon
08-23-2007, 11:03 AM
an example of unloading is when a bear poops in the woods....

sorry i couldn't help myself. :p

i knew i should've wrote a disclaimer before posting that!

habib
08-23-2007, 11:04 AM
Can you describe this "unloading" more vividly, or maybe with pictures?

It's not really jumping though. Jumping implies going airborn just for the sake of going airborne. When tennis players who know what they're doing leave the ground, they're not really jumping, they're pushing off from the ground with such force that they leave it. It's hard to explain visually or otherwise, as its a tactile feeling more than anything. Simply "jumping" into the shot produces bad form, decreases directional control - just jumbles everything up, basically. Leaving the ground on a stroke is the result of a massive transfer of energy.

cj011
08-23-2007, 11:09 AM
Please for the mother of God ignore the jumping. Focusing on the consequences will screw you. Focus on getting your weight planted on atleast one foot. After that focus on getting your weight centered in between your feet. Then you will be able to load up you weight.

habib
08-23-2007, 11:18 AM
I don't recommend this tactic. Pro's get to practice much more than most people and have time to groove this shot. I see a lot of average players try to copy this and it leads to increased errors or slow recovery for the next shot. Try and keep both feet on the ground. Most strokes should have a much lower base than what you see most players use at your local courts.

At our acadamy, we stress that you should hit your forehand open off of the back foot and only shift your weight to the non-dominate side as a way to recover and regain balance for the next shot.

What academy do attend/coach at?

TheFonz
08-23-2007, 11:21 AM
I'll try. It seems hard to do without being able to demonstrate.

Here's a break down on our basic forhand with the unloading. You have to understand the entire process for it to make the most sence. (Please forgive my grammer and typing mistakes as I soon have a lesson)

We teach all of our juniors to hit off of the back leg in an open stance with a loop.

(for a right hander)
1) Get the stick head up as quickly as possible with your right hand about shoulder height with the head as perpendicualr to the ground as you can get.

This limits the amount of weight that your arm has to support.

2) Get to the spot where you think the ball will be struck as quickly as you can. This is one of the biggest problems with most players. They think "I got time...". This leads to poor footwork and preperation.

3) Once you are to the spot your stick should have started the loop backwards. You should keep your feet moving with short choppy steps to adjust to the ball. Once commited, you should be open with almost all of your weight on your back foot (right). You should be low to the ground. Most players are way to upright when hitting. This is the loaded phase.

4) As you are entering the hitting zone, you should be timeing your sholder uncoil and and pushing off of the load leg as you make contact with the ball. Your arm should be fairly lose with not much effort. The power comes for the bigger muscels of the leg and hip turn.

5) As the ball leave the face of the stick, you should start to shift your weight to the right leg in order to regain balance and prepar for the next shot by doing a small split step.

Hope that helps....

TheFonz
08-23-2007, 11:31 AM
What academy do attend/coach at?

Fire and Ice Tennis Academy in Georgia. It's not the biggest, but we do have 8 div I scholarships for our players in 5 years. Not too bad.

I only teach there part time. I just love tennis and like to be around it.

habib
08-23-2007, 12:43 PM
I'll try. It seems hard to do without being able to demonstrate.

Here's a break down on our basic forhand with the unloading. You have to understand the entire process for it to make the most sence. (Please forgive my grammer and typing mistakes as I soon have a lesson)

We teach all of our juniors to hit off of the back leg in an open stance with a loop.

(for a right hander)
1) Get the stick head up as quickly as possible with your right hand about shoulder height with the head as perpendicualr to the ground as you can get.

This limits the amount of weight that your arm has to support.

2) Get to the spot where you think the ball will be struck as quickly as you can. This is one of the biggest problems with most players. They think "I got time...". This leads to poor footwork and preperation.

3) Once you are to the spot your stick should have started the loop backwards. You should keep your feet moving with short choppy steps to adjust to the ball. Once commited, you should be open with almost all of your weight on your back foot (right). You should be low to the ground. Most players are way to upright when hitting. This is the loaded phase.

4) As you are entering the hitting zone, you should be timeing your sholder uncoil and and pushing off of the load leg as you make contact with the ball. Your arm should be fairly lose with not much effort. The power comes for the bigger muscels of the leg and hip turn.

5) As the ball leave the face of the stick, you should start to shift your weight to the right leg in order to regain balance and prepar for the next shot by doing a small split step.

Hope that helps....

To me all of this sounds good with the exception of using the rear leg to load and unload all the weight. The way I see it, your weight should be pretty evenly distributed and both legs should contribute to the "lift" part of "sit and lift." Not only does concentrating your weight on the back leg lead to no momentum transfer forward into the ball, but two legs generate more power than one.

abenguyen
08-23-2007, 10:15 PM
i was wondering how they get into position so accrurately and quick to get the timing of transfer weight or load or unload

cause they are pro and have been playing for a very LONG time. they practice in and out. and thats how they are so far in the game

TheFonz
08-24-2007, 04:31 AM
To me all of this sounds good with the exception of using the rear leg to load and unload all the weight. The way I see it, your weight should be pretty evenly distributed and both legs should contribute to the "lift" part of "sit and lift." Not only does concentrating your weight on the back leg lead to no momentum transfer forward into the ball, but two legs generate more power than one.

watch more pros hit.. Most alway load the back leg in an open position.

Exci
08-24-2007, 05:24 AM
To me all of this sounds good with the exception of using the rear leg to load and unload all the weight. The way I see it, your weight should be pretty evenly distributed and both legs should contribute to the "lift" part of "sit and lift." Not only does concentrating your weight on the back leg lead to no momentum transfer forward into the ball, but two legs generate more power than one.

I agree with TheFonz. Besides, to me it sounds like you don't hit your forehand in this particular way? I started doing it naturally eventually after my coach told me that it's just a side effect of the unloading process instead of just jumping. Now if I do lift from the ground, it's always because of my rear foot that pushes me up and the reason, I think, is that if I push myself off with that foot, I push myself through the ball. Now if I were to push myself off with both, then I would be lifting myself more in a vertical plane and the whole thing would be rather pointless. Besides, try landing on your front foot after your pushed yourself off with both.. :) Kind of an awkward movement if you ask me!

habib
08-24-2007, 10:15 AM
I agree with TheFonz. Besides, to me it sounds like you don't hit your forehand in this particular way? I started doing it naturally eventually after my coach told me that it's just a side effect of the unloading process instead of just jumping. Now if I do lift from the ground, it's always because of my rear foot that pushes me up and the reason, I think, is that if I push myself off with that foot, I push myself through the ball. Now if I were to push myself off with both, then I would be lifting myself more in a vertical plane and the whole thing would be rather pointless. Besides, try landing on your front foot after your pushed yourself off with both.. :) Kind of an awkward movement if you ask me!

I actually have a tendency to do exactly what Fonz is saying - namely, loading the backleg. I find that when I use both legs I generate far more power and consistency - it's just much harder and more exhausting to do on a regular basis. To his comment about "most" of the tour doing this, I'm not sure I agree. Some players are notorious for it - Blake, for instance, and Djokovic at times. But guys like Federer, Nadal, Djokovic at other times, etc... generally use both legs to drive up, forward, and into the ball.