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View Full Version : Where to stand when your opponent is pulled way out of the side line?


Golden Retriever
08-26-2007, 11:59 AM
When your opponent is pulled way out of the side line, it seems like you already have the point but actually you are not safe yet. If he has the time to set up for the ball, he can still hit a winner against you (aka Nadal), in fact he has more open space to hit into when he is way out of the court.
So where should you stand in preparation for his one last shot? At the net? Cross-court at the baseline? At the centre of the baseline? At the corner of the baseline closest to your opponent? It seems to me no matter where you stand you still leave a lot of open space for him.

Undrayon
08-26-2007, 02:07 PM
Follow the direction of the ball. You have to remember, just because there is alot of space open doesn't mean all those places are equally easy to hit to.

Yes, Nadal and other pros can hit some amazing shots but I doubt you are playing anyone at that level. Follow the same rule as with approach shots, follow in with the same path as the ball.

Rickson
08-26-2007, 02:53 PM
When your opponent is pulled way out of the side line, it seems like you already have the point but actually you are not safe yet. If he has the time to set up for the ball, he can still hit a winner against you (aka Nadal), in fact he has more open space to hit into when he is way out of the court.
So where should you stand in preparation for his one last shot? At the net? Cross-court at the baseline? At the centre of the baseline? At the corner of the baseline closest to your opponent? It seems to me no matter where you stand you still leave a lot of open space for him.

If you pull him way over to one side, you play close to the sideline where you pulled him because he has to hit an extremely sharp and almost impossible angle to get the ball in crosscourt.

BeHappy
08-26-2007, 03:26 PM
you should stand far back from the baseline, and stand to the opposite side of the court to where he's standing of the centre of the baseline to cover the angle.

that is, if he's on your right, you stand a few feet to the left of the centre of the baseline etc

Wheelz
08-26-2007, 04:03 PM
I thought if you pull your opponent out of the court you should go to the net to cut his angles and give you more angles to finish him.

BeHappy
08-26-2007, 04:06 PM
yeah, that works too.

Undrayon: Your opponent wouldn't have to hit a 'miracle shot', he'd just have to hit the ball crosscourt and you would lose if you stood where you're suggesting

Golden Retriever
08-26-2007, 07:07 PM
I thought if you pull your opponent out of the court you should go to the net to cut his angles and give you more angles to finish him.

I really don't think going to the net is a good idea. That would open up the court for him to hit his passing shot or lob.

Golden Retriever
08-26-2007, 07:08 PM
you should stand far back from the baseline, and stand to the opposite side of the court to where he's standing of the centre of the baseline to cover the angle.

that is, if he's on your right, you stand a few feet to the left of the centre of the baseline etc


I 100% agree with you, thanks for the tip.

Off The Wall
08-26-2007, 09:06 PM
When your opponent is pulled way out of the side line, it seems like you already have the point but actually you are not safe yet. If he has the time to set up for the ball, he can still hit a winner against you (aka Nadal), in fact he has more open space to hit into when he is way out of the court.
So where should you stand in preparation for his one last shot? At the net? Cross-court at the baseline? At the centre of the baseline? At the corner of the baseline closest to your opponent? It seems to me no matter where you stand you still leave a lot of open space for him.

Depends. If you've pulled him off the court with an approach shot, continue forward and cheat toward the line. If he can hit that cross-court by you, say, "nice shot."

If you're in the backcourt, use the center of all possible returns.

The thing is, with experience, you'll know you don't "already have the point." You'll know before he gets there how well he'll be positioned for his shot. That knowledge opens up more options for you. So, be on the lookout.

Slazenger
08-26-2007, 09:53 PM
Someone already said it. For baseline play, your ideal position to wait for covering the court would be the middle of the angle of best possible returns.

So in this case, say you hit an angled cross-court forehand and have pulled your opponent outside the doubles alley, you would ideally wait in the middle of the angle of best possible returns.
Best possible returns are
-sharp crosscourt forehand, so say halfway up your duece service box
-down the line, right in the backhand corner at the baseline.

The middle of this angle would be to the right of the centre of your baseline.


That being said, you take into account the habits of the person you are playing to determine exactly where you stand.

For the shot I described above, when playing a particular opponent of mine, I would stand closer to the backhand corner because on any shot out wide, his favourite reply is the down-the-line.