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BORISK
08-29-2007, 06:54 PM
Is it possible to hit a powerful slice?
Mine is always long.

xtremerunnerars
08-29-2007, 07:13 PM
Sure it is. A pro would probably blow most of us off the court with one of their slice backhands. They keep it low over the net so they don't have to worry as much for starters. Add in years and years of practice and you'll be just as good as they are...maybe.

Bagumbawalla
08-29-2007, 09:12 PM
Yes, if your slice is going long then, most likely, your racket face is too open (facing up). Hold the racket with the face almost perpendicular to the court and make your slicing motion a long, full downward stroke through the ball trying to get the ball just above the net.

For practice try this: have someone hit you balls (say to your backhand)- hit the first one with slight topspin, the next one fairly flat, and the third with slight slice. In every case try to hit deep and with similar force and followthrough. This is a good way to get the feel of controling the flight of the ball with spin.

mucat
08-29-2007, 10:53 PM
Also, you need to have a higher than net ball to work with. Topspin makes the ball drop and backspin (slice) makes the ball fly up (float). So the harder you hit the slice, the more it float. The way to counter this is to hit down, hence you need the high ball. Also, as the backspin contact the ground, it force the ball to slow down and bounce up. However, for a given angle of attack, there is a friction threshold for the combination of backspin and speed. If you can hit pass that, the ball will skid, similiar to a car travelling too fast and try to brake too hard and skid out of control. Those are the skidding slice.

Sliceboy2
08-30-2007, 09:29 AM
Power should be controlled when you a slice, since the ball skims the air like a frisbee it would likely sail long if you overhit the ball. Unless you are way above the net that you could cut the ball really hard and bring it down right away, otherwise topspin is the way to go.

widmerpool
08-30-2007, 09:39 AM
trust me on this one. i stayed at a holiday inn...

visualize the motion as following the gentle curve of a saucer

-you'll stroke the ball (not chop down)

-you'll hit THROUGH the ball

-the ball will penetrate and stay down

Trinity TC
08-30-2007, 11:27 AM
Put a little side spin on your slice and aim for the bottom of the net. Hit it hard and it should skim the net and land nice and deep.

The side spin gives you a longer motion and a kind of inverted windshield wiper follow through with the racquet head pointing straight down if done right. You can hit it off your back or front foot and off of high or low balls.

Tell us how it works out.

ProStaff Legend
08-30-2007, 05:49 PM
y not? a friend of mine does this shot where he takes a huge chop @ the ball and makes a very heavy ball that skids when it lands. it sounds impractical but its definitely hard to return

dave333
08-30-2007, 06:21 PM
Don't aim so high over the net and close your racquet face so its more perpendicular with the ground.

A fast slice is trouble for rec players. It requires excellant footwork to do something against it and most rec players hit it late.

In D Zone
09-04-2007, 01:34 PM
I want some pointers on hitting a mean forehand slice.... back when I was just learning to play tennis, a co-worker who hits a fast forehand slice that skids down the corner. I noticed he uses it more often on his approach shots.

I have used the forehand slice more as a defense when pulled to the right, or when returning a hard fast serve to my right. I also wanted to know if using the forehand slice down the line on approach is ideal or topspin is much better?

kevhen
09-04-2007, 02:35 PM
Just hit your slice very low to the net. Don't hit it too hard. It will drop in if you hit it low enough but don't try to overhit it. You won't hit many winners with a slice backhand, although if you hit it low enough, you can hit some dropshot like winners with it.

35ft6
09-04-2007, 08:16 PM
A pro isn't going to overpower a decent player with their slice. How their slice might overWHELM them is with their placement.

You shouldn't really go for power on slice shots. In fact, most of the time when I'm hitting it terribly, it's because I'm trying to put too much stick on it. Counter-intuitively, when I just concentrate on making smooth contact, I get more stick on it. Not quite as extreme, but the idea of a power slice backhand is almost like a power drop shot. Yeah, some people hit it firmer than others, like Rosewall, but don't concern yourself with developing a powerful slice backhand.

J011yroger
09-04-2007, 10:06 PM
^^^ Good advice, but when you play someone who has that hard nasty biting almost unfair slice BH it is tough to not want one for yourself.

You have been around the block, so I am sure you know what I am talking about. I only know a couple of people who have it, very high level old school players, but man, it's deadly.

J

meticulous
09-11-2007, 08:43 AM
[QUOTE=Trinity TC;1705842]Put a little side spin on your slice and

meticulous
09-11-2007, 08:46 AM
Put a little side spin on your slice and[/QUOTE]

Trinity, could you explain what is that " side slice". Thanks

Bungalo Bill
09-11-2007, 09:48 AM
Is it possible to hit a powerful slice?
Mine is always long.

Yes, but powerful is in relation to the stroke itself and what the ball is doing in the air. Since it is cushioned by airflow on the bottom of the ball, you need to provide an appropriate amount of force against the ball in relation to how the ball travels. Usually, this means you take 3/4's of the energy you would use for a topspin shot and apply this to an underspin shot.

BORISK
09-11-2007, 06:07 PM
Yes, but powerful is in relation to the stroke itself and what the ball is doing in the air. Since it is cushioned by airflow on the bottom of the ball, you need to provide an appropriate amount of force against the ball in relation to how the ball travels. Usually, this means you take 3/4's of the energy you would use for a topspin shot and apply this to an underspin shot.

Bungalo Bill thank you.
1.There is always "airflow" on the bottom/top of the ball. What is special about slice?
2. Applying any kind of spin reduces power, or i am wrong?

soyelmocano
09-11-2007, 08:59 PM
Bungalo Bill thank you.
1.There is always "airflow" on the bottom/top of the ball. What is special about slice?
2. Applying any kind of spin reduces power, or i am wrong?

1) Not BB, but I'll try to help out. It is all about physics - relatively speaking. If we look at things from the point of view of the ball (more specifically the bottom of the ball in this example), when hitting a slice backhand the movement of the air is faster than a topspin shot of equal forward velocity. The reason is that the bottom of the ball is spinning in the same direction as the shot. If you take a ball and throw it forward and let it bounce in sand, you will notice that a small indention is made with a small hill at the front. The same thing is happening in the air. The pressure creates a small compression of air (hill) on which the ball rides, making a slice resist gravity more and float more. Conversely with topspin, the hill is on top and the pressure is working WITH gravity to make the ball drop faster than normal. If there were no air, the spin would make no difference to how the ball reacted in the air. So to answer your question, yes there is always airflow, but it is the relative airflow that matters.
2) If a set amount of force is used, the most powerful would be in an opposite direction of the incoming flight. This may or may not create a good shot, but would return the most energy into pure speed of the shot. Any deviation from this will impart the same energy, but some will be used to create spin. So, yes. any spin will reduce power (speed).

Hope this helps more than it makes things more confusing.

Bungalo Bill
09-12-2007, 07:32 AM
Bungalo Bill thank you.
1.There is always "airflow" on the bottom/top of the ball. What is special about slice?

Air pressure is greater on a slice below the ball, "hence floating on air". Topspin has greater pressure on top of the ball, "hence the ball just drops".

Underspin works similar to an airplanes wing when flying. Underspin is a great way to conserve energy since you can use the physics of air pressure to your benefit. Conserving energy can be a decision you make during a long point, during a long game, during a long set, or during a long match.

It also mixes things up. Underspin has a unique benefit in that many times it doesn't provide the same bounce for your opponent to groove on. Of course, this is if you can hit a good slice. :)

2. Applying any kind of spin reduces power, or i am wrong?

I don't understand this question.

Trinity TC
09-12-2007, 09:49 AM
Trinity, could you explain what is that " side slice". Thanks
You can carve under the ball and go from 6 o'clock to 5 o'clock.8-)

BORISK
09-14-2007, 04:11 PM
Air pressure is greater on a slice below the ball, "hence floating on air". Topspin has greater pressure on top of the ball, "hence the ball just drops".

Underspin works similar to an airplanes wing when flying. Underspin is a great way to conserve energy since you can use the physics of air pressure to your benefit. Conserving energy can be a decision you make during a long point, during a long game, during a long set, or during a long match.

It also mixes things up. Underspin has a unique benefit in that many times it doesn't provide the same bounce for your opponent to groove on. Of course, this is if you can hit a good slice. :)



I don't understand this question.

More spin - less power.

veryfatchocobo
09-14-2007, 04:32 PM
I found that if I lean forward on the slice, it gets low enough to graze the let cord. Have you tried this yet?

BORISK
09-14-2007, 04:36 PM
i always try to move and lean forward on any stroke.

BORISK
09-14-2007, 04:42 PM
You can carve under the ball and go from 6 o'clock to 5 o'clock.8-)

I like from 7 o'clock to 5 o'clock but I can do it ONLY for low balls.
High balls , including backhand slice, is my weak point.

35ft6
09-14-2007, 05:30 PM
2. Applying any kind of spin reduces power, or i am wrong? But in tennis, you're trying to keep the ball in the court, it's not just a matter of ball speed, but how fast can you hit the ball and still keep it in the court, so in terms of playing tennis, for most groundstrokes, spin allows you to hit a faster ball. If you're trying to hit the ball out of a stadium then yes, less spin is ideal.

Tennisplayer92
09-15-2007, 10:57 PM
dont take it in the air if you want to slice. to hti a nice slice what works besrt for me is guiding the racquet down as the ball curves down. essentially, if the ball is around knee height, that is my preferred contact zone and gravity will work with you to create an amazing shot. and if you wish to go further on this, side spin as someone mentioned eariler with the contact of the 5 o clock opposed to 6 will DEFINITELY clear the net better and give your opponent an unexpected jump <--- that way.

Rui
09-16-2007, 10:33 PM
As others (at least one) has mentioned, don't go for a hard slice. You are more likely to hit it out than in. In other words, you are lowering the percentage of a successful return.