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Automatix
08-31-2007, 08:32 AM
So it's going to be my first leather grip replacement and I have a couple of questions… first of all when I remove the stock grip I need to clean the pallet right? So would 100% Acetone be good? I now acetone won’t hurt the wooden pallet but will it be sufficient to dissolve the rest of the glue on the pallet? And secondly I want to install a Gamma leather grip… I’d like to know does it have an adhesive surface like synthetic replacement grips? I also wanted to know is it necessary to use a staple gun? I don’t have one so it’s a problem…

Koz
08-31-2007, 10:06 AM
I don't have a staple gun either. What I do is take a thick staple (something you'd get at home depot or lowes) and carefully pound it in with a hammer. I imagine acetone would work fine. I don't personally worry about cleaning off the grip too well. If it's sticky, why clean it off...it'll help keep the grip on that much better.

barry
08-31-2007, 11:06 AM
I usually use Elmer's glue and spread it around on the handle, then wrap it. Staples can damage the handle stock, especially pounding it with a hammer.

Most of the newer leather grips have stick on the bottom side.

Cruzer
08-31-2007, 11:23 AM
I have never used staples when installing a leather grip. I don't know of any leather grips that you buy now that don't have adhesive on the back of the grip and I have alwyas found the adhesive backing to be quite sufficient to keep the grip from slipping.

Amone
08-31-2007, 12:06 PM
Firstly, I don't believe you need to remove the old grip adhesive, once the grip is off. I have replaced my grip maybe 10-15 times in the last two to three years, maybe more, and I have never done so with the exception of when I wanted to apply a heat-shrink wrap. Secondly, yes. Gamma leather has an adhesive backing; I've used it personally, though that was admittedly a year and a half ago, or so. Lastly, no. Staple guns are not necessary, I have never used one for my grips (though I did, reapplying a removed buttcap, that's irrelevant..) and I wrap them as well as or better than all of the people I know who are paid (Don't get me wrong-- it's not their job. But it's sort of a side hobby for most of them). It's just a matter of keeping the bottom pressed down until it's overlapped by the grip.

Automatix
08-31-2007, 12:14 PM
Thx you guys! You've been really helpful! THX! :D

Keifers
08-31-2007, 05:16 PM
Fyi, I posted the following in another thread:

This might have been posted before, but here's a tip I got recently about putting a new leather grip on...

As you wrap the new grip around the butt cap (any new replacement grip, actually), it's not uncommon to get a wrinkle where the grip starts to wrap onto itself. To prevent this, wrap it once (pulling fairly tightly), go back, and then wrap it again. The leather is stretched with that first pull and then again with the second -- you should get a nice, smooth new grip.
Good luck.

Lloyd Barcenilla
09-01-2007, 03:13 AM
I also use doublesided tape

nyc
09-01-2007, 04:03 AM
...and goo-off works nicely to remove any adhesive residue...

JohnValderama
03-31-2011, 04:38 PM
Sorry, I am a newbie at gripping. But I have one question. Is it necessary to have a leather grip?

I always use an over grip over the wooden pallet. Is that normal or should I install a leather grip first?

stoo
03-31-2011, 04:53 PM
Sorry, I am a newbie at gripping. But I have one question. Is it necessary to have a leather grip?

I always use an over grip over the wooden pallet. Is that normal or should I install a leather grip first?

It's purely up to you and the desired feel and weight you are trying to achieve. If you are comfortable with just an overgrip on the pallet, then go with it. Whatever works for you.

JohnValderama
03-31-2011, 04:59 PM
Oh, Ok. Thanks.


However, there is no formality to not having it right? ?

Because, isn't there a reason they call it Over Grip? What is it formally supposed to go "Over" ?

weksa
03-31-2011, 09:04 PM
Oh, Ok. Thanks.


However, there is no formality to not having it right? ?

Because, isn't there a reason they call it Over Grip? What is it formally supposed to go "Over" ?

An overgrip (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/overgrips.html) is formally supposed to go over what's called a replacement grip (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/replacegrips.html), which offers more cushioning. Replacement grips can be synthetic material or leather. Generally, if you choose to use an overgrip on top of a replacement grip, you change the overgrip as often as needed once the overgrip gets all old and torn up. The replacement grip thus only needs to be changed once in a long while.

max
04-01-2011, 08:22 AM
It sounds like you're using a wood racquet.

If that's the case, I use short tacks. (The first time I tried this, I used a copper tack pulled out of an old Wilson; makes sense, copper doesn't rust). I've also seen long staples, but this requires an air compression driven staple gun, which I don't have.

I like double sided scotch tape for putting on leather grips. This weekend I'm putting a Volkl leather on a frame; the leather already has a built in adhesive strip, but I'm putting down some doublesided tape on the handle. It's good to have.

Important to remember to PULL IT TIGHT as you go. Go Slow, Go Deliberately. Remember to make it an even wrap.