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sharp*shooter
09-22-2007, 02:59 PM
Is there any real disadvantage of a racket having a low swingweight given it has a high static weight? (12+ oz)

krz
09-22-2007, 03:02 PM
That would mean less weight in the head. Less stability.

12oz racket thats got a lower swing weight will be less stable than the 12oz racket with a higher swing weight. (usually of course)

vkartikv
09-22-2007, 03:03 PM
You may not be able to hit as heavy a ball as you could with a higher SW. But the advantage is excellent maneuverability at the net. If you play primarily from the baseline, a higher SW may be more productive.

JMS
09-22-2007, 03:04 PM
yep less stability

sharp*shooter
09-22-2007, 03:08 PM
Hmm, i'm using the tecnifibre tfight 320 and it is very stable, it says the sw is 308 but some people on here say it is more like 315 or around that.. I was looking at the 335 because it has a sw of 320 though I guess that isn't much higher really.

vkartikv
09-22-2007, 03:13 PM
I don't understand this 'no stability' accusation. You have less mass on the top edge of the frame and that may give it less 'apparent stability' on the groundstrokes but if you want a perfect volleying racquet, a head light balance is the way to go (assuming there is enough static mass). I choose frames with a SW b/w 315 and 325 and anything higher affects my volleys.

sharp*shooter
09-22-2007, 03:22 PM
Can any Tfight 320 users share their opinions on its stability and maybe compare it to the 335?

The 320 is a GREAT racket btw, im just concerned if the swingweight may be a problem against some big hitters when I come across them.

Gmedlo
09-22-2007, 03:23 PM
I don't understand this 'no stability' accusation. You have less mass on the top edge of the frame and that may give it less 'apparent stability' on the groundstrokes but if you want a perfect volleying racquet, a head light balance is the way to go (assuming there is enough static mass). I choose frames with a SW b/w 315 and 325 and anything higher affects my volleys.

I don't really get it either. After almost 6 months of playing exclusively with demo racquets, I found stability has much more to do with the racquet's headsize (ps85 is one of the most stable racquets money can buy) and your forearm strength than SW anyway.
EDIT:
Can any Tfight 320 users share their opinions on its stability and maybe compare it to the 335?

The 320 is a GREAT racket btw, im just concerned if the swingweight may be a problem against some big hitters when I come across them.

I demod both and found the 320 to be more stable. With the 320, you also have more custimization options without making the racquet too heavy. But I didn't find either of those racquets to have any particular strength in terms of stability, so if you want more stability you may find better results elsewhere.

Hobomagic
09-22-2007, 03:28 PM
Less plow through. I personally love the feel of high sw, its a matter of preference and what type of game you have.

KOtennis
09-22-2007, 03:28 PM
imo, with low swingweight, your returns will suffer.
especially against but servers.

BreakPoint
09-22-2007, 03:42 PM
Hmm, i'm using the tecnifibre tfight 320 and it is very stable, it says the sw is 308 but some people on here say it is more like 315 or around that.. I was looking at the 335 because it has a sw of 320 though I guess that isn't much higher really.
Well, just like the TF-320's actual swingweight feels higher than the spec of 308, the SW of the TF-335 also feels higher than its spec of 320 (to me anyway).

I agree that the SW of the TF-320 feels more like 315, and to me, the SW of the TF-335 feels more like 328.

krz
09-22-2007, 03:43 PM
I didn't say no stability. Read it again.

This is relative. Between 2 12oz rackets the one with more mass in the head will be more stable.

A 12oz racket is usually going to be pretty stable no matter what.

sharp*shooter
09-22-2007, 04:03 PM
Well, just like the TF-320's actual swingweight feels higher than the spec of 308, the SW of the TF-335 also feels higher than its spec of 320 (to me anyway).

I agree that the SW of the TF-320 feels more like 315, and to me, the SW of the TF-335 feels more like 328.

Right I see.

My 320 weights 12.1 oz on the scales in stock form (!), with an overgrip it might be about 12.2 oz im not sure. What concerns me about the 335 is it could weight about 12.7 oz or more when i'm done. I'm not sure how 'user friendly' that would be because i've never used a stick that heavy before.

Basically, if my racket weighs about 12.2 oz, and the swingweight is about 315, will I have nothing to worry about stability wise?

LafayetteHitter
09-22-2007, 04:09 PM
Since swingweight is being discussed I want to post a question I have that I think may run along these lines. I have used numerous mid sized frames over the last years. Recently I acquired a pair of Pro Staff Asian Tour 90 frames. The swingweight of course is pretty low on these compared to most of the 12-12.5 ounce racquets I am used to. Each time out with these I am returning with soreness in my forearm and elbow. I have never had this happen before and one is strung with gut mains/syn gut crosses. Both are strung at 55crosses and 56 in the mains. No more mishits with these than any other given day with another racquet. With the information I have posted do you guys think it is the static weight or swingweight coming into question here? I have even used the PS85 and not had the issue.

BreakPoint
09-22-2007, 04:40 PM
Basically, if my racket weighs about 12.2 oz, and the swingweight is about 315, will I have nothing to worry about stability wise?
Having played with both the TF-320 and the TF-335, I really wish there was a TF-328 which splits the weight difference right in between the two as I think that would be perfect for me. (Sounds like I'm talking about BMW's, doesn't it? ;) ) It's just like I wish there was a racquet that was right in the middle between the AK90 and the US K90, as that would also be perfect for me.

Shucks...I guess I'm just never happy. It sucks being a perfectionist. ;) :-(

BreakPoint
09-22-2007, 04:43 PM
Since swingweight is being discussed I want to post a question I have that I think may run along these lines. I have used numerous mid sized frames over the last years. Recently I acquired a pair of Pro Staff Asian Tour 90 frames. The swingweight of course is pretty low on these compared to most of the 12-12.5 ounce racquets I am used to. Each time out with these I am returning with soreness in my forearm and elbow. I have never had this happen before and one is strung with gut mains/syn gut crosses. Both are strung at 55crosses and 56 in the mains. No more mishits with these than any other given day with another racquet. With the information I have posted do you guys think it is the static weight or swingweight coming into question here? I have even used the PS85 and not had the issue.
Perhaps both? My AnCode90 has a higher static and swingweight and I haven't had any arm problems with it except when I try and use poly.

LafayetteHitter
09-22-2007, 05:38 PM
Thanks Breakpoint. I was curious if it might be both the static weight and swingweight. I think the AN90 definately swings a little heavier and probably provides a little more heft through the ball.

pianotennis
09-22-2007, 07:56 PM
Since swingweight is being discussed I want to post a question I have that I think may run along these lines. I have used numerous mid sized frames over the last years. Recently I acquired a pair of Pro Staff Asian Tour 90 frames. The swingweight of course is pretty low on these compared to most of the 12-12.5 ounce racquets I am used to. Each time out with these I am returning with soreness in my forearm and elbow. I have never had this happen before and one is strung with gut mains/syn gut crosses. Both are strung at 55crosses and 56 in the mains. No more mishits with these than any other given day with another racquet. With the information I have posted do you guys think it is the static weight or swingweight coming into question here? I have even used the PS85 and not had the issue.



I have very similar experience. I have used PS85 for many years, and I owned an Asian PS Tour 90 before when it came out for a very brief time, didn't like it at all, sold it. My Vincent is around 12.6 oz, and this Asian Tour 90 is somewhere around 11.4 oz, with it I also had soreness in my elbow and shoulder. I string my PS85 with Kevlar/Poly at 58/58, and I never had that issue. By the way, I love the feeling of heavy racquet at net, although downside is a bit loss of maneuverability, but stability is better(assuming a headlight).

Hobomagic
09-22-2007, 07:57 PM
Less power. Less plow through

sureshs
09-22-2007, 08:24 PM
I don't really get it either. After almost 6 months of playing exclusively with demo racquets, I found stability has much more to do with the racquet's headsize (ps85 is one of the most stable racquets money can buy) and your forearm strength than SW anyway.


Is the PS85 a good example? It has a static weight of 12.6 oz strung!

BreakPoint
09-22-2007, 08:35 PM
Is the PS85 a good example? It has a static weight of 12.6 oz strung!
Which was considered Super Light (SL). ;)

Ronny
09-22-2007, 09:45 PM
Less power. Less plow through

the tf-320 18*20 has more power than a fxp prestige and its sw is 308g. is the any explaination for this then?

krz
09-23-2007, 12:38 AM
There are also other aspects that effect power(stiffness, string pattern, headsize ect). But, generally you would get more power from more weight in the head.

keithchircop
09-24-2007, 05:54 AM
Very good thread. Yet I don't see anyone mentioning increase in power as swingweight rises.

I recently found a flexible 110 OS racquet that weighs 12oz, yet has a swingweight of only 307. The result is an OS racquet that's as powerful as your average 98 midplus. You get the forgiveness of an OS without flat balls sailing long. In this case, the low swingweight is a plus.

markwillplay
09-24-2007, 11:14 AM
what racquet would that be?

krz
09-24-2007, 11:38 AM
Very good thread. Yet I don't see anyone mentioning increase in power as swingweight rises.


one post above yours I mention it lol. More weight, more power, I think its been mentioned a couple times already.

dman72
09-24-2007, 12:12 PM
add 10 grams of lead at 12 o'clock to any racquet that isn't already pushing ridiculously high swingweight...the result is more power.

tbini87
09-24-2007, 12:59 PM
adding more weight adds to power, but make sure you don't compare two different racquets. that is comparing apples to oranges because other factors play a role in how much power a frame has.

dman72
09-24-2007, 01:10 PM
adding more weight adds to power, but make sure you don't compare two different racquets. that is comparing apples to oranges because other factors play a role in how much power a frame has.


Absolutely, but all things being equal, adding swingweight adds power, until you get to the point where you can't swing the racquet as quickly (the sw2 theory). Most stock racquets are well below this point.

I

drak
09-24-2007, 01:15 PM
What is your playing level? IMO a lower SW frame that is also light (sub 11 oz at least) will make much less of a difference against 3.0-4.0 players in general. Why, because you don't often see a consistently "heavy ball" like you do with some 4.5's and especially higher levels - that's where static weight AND a higher SW really can make a difference.

AndrewD
09-24-2007, 03:30 PM
Is there any real disadvantage of a racket having a low swingweight given it has a high static weight? (12+ oz)

In general, no. Of course it does depend on how low the swingweight is. A 12.2oz racquet with a swingweight of 320 (for example) gives you a nice balance of heft and maneouvrability that a 12.2oz racquet with a 335 swingweight can't. While the latter might hit a slightly heavier ball the former will be far easier to move into position when preparing for your shots and far easier to swing fast when generating spin. However, a 12.2oz racquet with a swingweight under 310 will dish up a more anaemic hit than one with a better balance of static and swing weight.

keithchircop
09-24-2007, 03:35 PM
In general, no. Of course it does depend on how low the swingweight is. A 12.2oz racquet with a swingweight of 320 (for example) gives you a nice balance of heft and maneouvrability that a 12.2oz racquet with a 335 swingweight can't. While the latter might hit a slightly heavier ball the former will be far easier to move into position when preparing for your shots and far easier to swing fast when generating spin. However, a 12.2oz racquet with a swingweight under 310 will dish up a more anaemic hit than one with a better balance of static and swing weight.

i've seen lots of posts from you regarding swingweight. what is your personal favourite range?