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View Full Version : What's your favorite cheese?


max
10-03-2007, 01:55 PM
. . . mine's basic, small production Wisconsin colby. Absolutely love the stuff. And toss in some cheese curds, too.

I've tried bleu cheeses; just doesn't do it for me. What do you like, and why?

chadilac
10-03-2007, 01:58 PM
my favorite is monterey jalapeno jack its the best

PDRPPHVS+
10-03-2007, 02:02 PM
Munster! (10)

TheShaun
10-03-2007, 02:20 PM
guda. 10 char

ShiroRm
10-03-2007, 04:28 PM
(goat milk version) robiola

dima
10-03-2007, 04:33 PM
Just Parmesan cheese.

blubber
10-03-2007, 04:44 PM
I like lots of cheeses, but nothing, NOTHING is more delicious than fresh mozzarella cheese.

ThePro101
10-03-2007, 04:55 PM
my favorite is monterey jalapeno jack its the best

+1 I second this choice

El Diablo
10-03-2007, 05:22 PM
Manchego. And whatever the cheese is that goes into sabayaki (Greek dish, cheese sauteed in Ouzo and lemon juice, served as appetizer.)

StealthGnome
10-03-2007, 05:23 PM
Provolone.
On everything.

dave333
10-03-2007, 06:08 PM
^^ yea, provolone.

I went to france once and had a really creamy brie once. it was great.

Fedace
10-03-2007, 06:11 PM
One that i just let go.

str33t
10-03-2007, 06:28 PM
Parmesan is great. Especially in salads.

vkartikv
10-03-2007, 06:38 PM
May sound strange to you guys but I can't stand it. Probably because I am from the East and not used to it's odour and texture..

Fedace
10-03-2007, 06:54 PM
May sound strange to you guys but I can't stand it. Probably because I am from the East and not used to it's odour and texture..

Did you just cut that cheeze??;)

ProStaff Legend
10-03-2007, 06:58 PM
Camembert and brie

TheShaun
10-03-2007, 07:03 PM
May sound strange to you guys but I can't stand it. Probably because I am from the East and not used to it's odour and texture..

what about paneer?

vkartikv
10-03-2007, 07:10 PM
what about paneer?

Ok, cottage cheese is the exception. I can't live without my North Indian dishes!!

ananda
10-03-2007, 07:59 PM
CAMEMBERT !!!
i am beginning to like the stinky cheeses, too.


i hope slice_bh_compliment does not see this thread. he will prolly name about 500 cheeses he likes :-)

Rui
10-03-2007, 10:00 PM
I preferr Swiss on a sandwich. Bleu in a salad. Cheddar on a taco. And Mozzarella plain.

AlpineCadet
10-03-2007, 10:29 PM
Baby Brie cheese on slices of baguettes with a glass of Red Wine seems to make for a decent combo in my book.

ilovecarlos
10-04-2007, 06:23 AM
Baby Brie cheese on slices of baguettes with a glass of Red Wine seems to make for a decent combo in my book.



Salivating...yeah...I'll have that too....never met a cheese I didn't like...like feta, provolone, parmesean, bleu, camembert, brie, stilton, cheddar, jack etc.....lately have been really digging Dubliner cheddar made near Blarney Castle in Ireland....mmmmmm.....made from contented cows milk....stoned on Guiness?????

PimpMyGame
10-04-2007, 06:35 AM
Brie
Stilton
Goat's
Camembert
Gorgonzola
Cheddar
Wensleydale with cranberries
Parmesan (shaved, not grated)
Anything with chili or mustard seed in it.

Dedans Penthouse
10-04-2007, 06:50 AM
Parmigiano Reggiano

ryan808
10-04-2007, 07:42 AM
I love sliced mozzarella and tomatoes with basil.

I also love pepper jack cheese in my sandwiches.

I can't stand the Laughing Cow variety type of cheese or anything I have to peel foil or wax off before eating.

Fedace
10-04-2007, 07:51 AM
OK but what about the region where the cheeze comes from ?? which cheeze do you like the best.?? Wisconsin, California, Deautch, Holland, French, or Korean ??

ShiroRm
10-04-2007, 08:02 AM
I love sliced mozzarella and tomatoes with basil.

I also love pepper jack cheese in my sandwiches.

I can't stand the Laughing Cow variety type of cheese or anything I have to peel foil or wax off before eating.

the first mix has a specific name: caprese (salad)

ananda
10-04-2007, 08:07 AM
Federer likes cheesecake. Mirkaberry cheesecake.

hjminard
10-04-2007, 08:16 AM
I'm partial to Italian cheeses: mozzarella, parmesan, pecorino, marscapone, parmigiano reggiano, romano, asiago, etc.

TheShaun
10-04-2007, 08:18 AM
Baby Brie cheese on slices of baguettes with a glass of Red Wine seems to make for a decent combo in my book.

is it just me or is it getting romantic in here? :p

ShiroRm
10-04-2007, 08:48 AM
both France and Italy have respectively more than 500 different types of cheese (I read an article saying Italy has about 5-6 more, some time ago).
their quality varies and the choice depends on personal tastes, of course.

but when I look at the market, I find a varied offer of italian cheeses (I mean: mozzarella, ricotta (even if they aren't exactly cheese), fresh/soft cheeses and hard/matured ones) even abroad (and many "funny" imitations), while I find mostly fresh/soft french cheeses, even in France.
I'm sure french cheese production is well varied, but unfortunately, when I go shopping, I don't notice it

ilovecarlos
10-04-2007, 08:53 AM
OK but what about the region where the cheeze comes from ?? which cheeze do you like the best.?? Wisconsin, California, Deautch, Holland, French, or Korean ??



I have friends from all over the world and LOVE cheeses made all over the world:D Wisconsin..yes.....New York State...yes....Italy...yes thank you...Spain.....yes please......Ireland...YES...The UK...Yes....Mexico.....Yes.....I do not descriminate...am an equal opportunity cheese eater;)

Dedans Penthouse
10-04-2007, 09:09 AM
I can't believe we're talking "cheese" and yet nobody's mentioned "Smegma"





:shock:---"not funny!"

ShiroRm
10-04-2007, 09:15 AM
hem, I know I could do a search by myself about non italian/french/swiss/duch good cheeses, but I lack informations (I tryed spanish or polish cheeses, but I can't remember their names) - I admit it - and the quest would be too vast.
so, do you have a pic of an american cheese you like or a pic of your favourite cheese produced in other countries? could you post it, please? ;-)

lonestar
10-04-2007, 09:54 AM
For me there is a big difference between mass-production cheese which you can buy in the supermarkets all around the world and cheese from certain regions produced in small quantities.

For example here in Switzerland you have all these farmers who make their own cheese (mostly hard/mature). They use to sell it directly at their farms or at the market etc.

Cheese is like wine. Fascinating or boring. There is nothing in between. :D

KoreanHB
10-04-2007, 09:55 AM
Muenster is the best.

LuckyR
10-04-2007, 10:17 AM
Parmigiano Reggiano

That is the party line and it is a great cheese, but much less interesting than a great French triple cream or Blue like Roquefort. Weird cheeses from small countries like Greece (mizithra) and Germany (cambezola) are a lot of fun too.

max
10-04-2007, 11:43 AM
I have to say, I think Kraft's really made people dislike good cheese: kind of the Hershey's chocolate of the cheese world. I avoid it.

I used to like a limburger cheese spread, but, curiously, still dislike limburger. The spread was great on a bagel: put on the spread, add fresh chopped onion, and you're good to go!

Dedans Penthouse
10-04-2007, 12:16 PM
That is the party line and it is a great cheese, but much less interesting than a great French triple cream or Blue like Roquefort. Weird cheeses from small countries like Greece (mizithra) and Germany (cambezola) are a lot of fun too.
Less interesting? Sez who?! Why you heartless son-of-a-biatch, and this, after I went through all that effort to do the Italian" color thing???? :sad:

Seriously, it all depends on the "situation." If I'm having a chilled carpaccio appetizer at a trattoria for example, I'll opt for copious, thickly-shaved pieces of parmigiano-reggiano.

But if I'm opting for a cheese to have with, e.g. a baguette and some liver pate (washed down with an icy-chilled Billecarte-Salmon Rose Brut Champagne), indeed, I would obviously try something more "luxuriant" and sensual in texture. As for Roquefort, great cheese, particularly as a salad dressing base or stuffed in a fillet migon with a wild mushroom duxelle. Speaking of "Le Fromage De La Belle France" (some "low-brow" trivia):

The *cough* "food" that is served at McDonald's in France, contains ingrediants that are all French made EXCEPT (ironically): the chedder cheese used in Le Big Macs, Royals (Quarter-Pounders/metric system), etc.. For all their cullinary greatness, they just don't have that "Vermont chedder" thing down pat....yet. :-)

LuckyR
10-04-2007, 03:12 PM
Less interesting? Sez who?! Why you heartless son-of-a-biatch, and this, after I went through all that effort to do the Italian" color thing???? :sad:

Seriously, it all depends on the "situation." If I'm having a chilled carpaccio appetizer at a trattoria for example, I'll opt for copious, thickly-shaved pieces of parmigiano-reggiano.

But if I'm opting for a cheese to have with, e.g. a baguette and some liver pate (washed down with an icy-chilled Billecarte-Salmon Rose Brut Champagne), indeed, I would obviously try something more "luxuriant" and sensual in texture. As for Roquefort, great cheese, particularly as a salad dressing base or stuffed in a fillet migon with a wild mushroom duxelle. Speaking of "Le Fromage De La Belle France" (some "low-brow" trivia):

The *cough* "food" that is served at McDonald's in France, contains ingrediants that are all French made EXCEPT (ironically): the chedder cheese used in Le Big Macs, Royals (Quarter-Pounders/metric system), etc.. For all their cullinary greatness, they just don't have that "Vermont chedder" thing down pat....yet. :-)


P-R with chilled carpaccio is taking the role of accompaniment. A role which it fills like no other on this planet (same as being shaved on pasta etc). Hence my comment as to it's interest. Alone, it is good but it is best (partially due to it's saltiness) with other foods.

Great Blues, triple creams and others can stand on their own, on say a cracker/crust of bread etc with maybe some fruit or somesuch.

ilovecarlos
10-04-2007, 03:16 PM
Less interesting? Sez who?! Why you heartless son-of-a-biatch, and this, after I went through all that effort to do the Italian" color thing???? :sad:

Seriously, it all depends on the "situation." If I'm having a chilled carpaccio appetizer at a trattoria for example, I'll opt for copious, thickly-shaved pieces of parmigiano-reggiano.

But if I'm opting for a cheese to have with, e.g. a baguette and some liver pate (washed down with an icy-chilled Billecarte-Salmon Rose Brut Champagne), indeed, I would obviously try something more "luxuriant" and sensual in texture. As for Roquefort, great cheese, particularly as a salad dressing base or stuffed in a fillet migon with a wild mushroom duxelle. Speaking of "Le Fromage De La Belle France" (some "low-brow" trivia):

The *cough* "food" that is served at McDonald's in France, contains ingrediants that are all French made EXCEPT (ironically): the chedder cheese used in Le Big Macs, Royals (Quarter-Pounders/metric system), etc.. For all their cullinary greatness, they just don't have that "Vermont chedder" thing down pat....yet. :-)



****sigh**** I just knew you were a gourmet and a gourmand****bats eyelashes*****blows kisses
and changes name
Mrs DedansPenthouse;)

malakas
10-04-2007, 04:38 PM
I love cheeses.: D
No.1 FETA! My most favourite is the Dodoni version which is much more salty.I hate these poor danish imitation,which don't include any goat milk,and are "low fat".pfftt.
Feta on dakos is great too: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Koukouvagia.jpg/280px-Koukouvagia.jpg

2.Ladotiri -which means oil cheese.It's ship milk and made only on the aegean island of Lesvos.Great but like all the great things in life has too many calories.sigh.

3 Rocfor (sp?) Love it even though it makes some ppl sick.:p

ShiroRm
10-04-2007, 11:10 PM
hi malakas
how do you call the large rusk in the pic?
we have it too, with an identical shape and call it "fresa (calabrese, id est of Calabria)"

origmarm
10-04-2007, 11:14 PM
The oldest gouda I can get my hands on, damn that is good.
I LOVE blue and soft cheeses, unfortunately I can't eat them anymore...grrrrr

origmarm
10-05-2007, 12:53 AM
Just noticed that username malakas...nice :)

mcpon
10-05-2007, 01:00 AM
I like swiss.

Gugafan_Redux
10-05-2007, 09:03 AM
Tie between swiss gruyiere and greek saganaki (sauteed in bourbon, set on fire, and doused with lemon at the table. Cue Homer drooling pic. gaaaaaa!)

But to be honest, I love lots of cheese. The worst is the crap cheddars they sell in the big chain grocery stores. Crystal Farms, for example. God awful. I bought a block of extra sharp cheddar. No flavor! None! It was dispicable. I'm sworn off them for good.

Props to he or she who mentioned Dubliner. Used to eat that lots when I lived in the UK.

malakas
10-05-2007, 04:00 PM
hi malakas
how do you call the large rusk in the pic?
we have it too, with an identical shape and call it "fresa (calabrese, id est of Calabria)"

We call it dakos.It's a local specialite of Crete.It's made with soaked rusk(usually from barley),on it grated tomato and on top of that pieces of feta cheese or myzithra with oil,origanum,salt/pepper and sometimes olives.It only got more popular only in the last years,and still in the north they don't know it :/..Fresa calabrese you say you call it? Doesn't suprise me,that there are similar dishes with Calabria and Sicily.;)
http://z.about.com/d/greekfood/1/0/F/E/dakos1a_170wh.jpg

Tie between swiss gruyiere and greek saganaki (sauteed in bourbon, set on fire, and doused with lemon at the table. Cue Homer drooling pic. gaaaaaa!)

http://www.desfina.com/Menu/pics/saganaki.jpg

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m105/bagdaddy_2006/smilies/msn_saliva.gif

ShiroRm
10-05-2007, 11:34 PM
these is how the "frese" may look like

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff14/andant123/frese_500_inte.jpg

The recipe is identical (a bit of water to soften it; olive oil; tomato; basil; salt), a part from feta, of course ;-)

ShiroRm
10-06-2007, 12:15 AM
two cheeses:

caciocavallo (silano). It's a quite old cheese: Hippocrates (V-IV century b.c.) already speaks about it

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff14/andant123/cacio2.jpg

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff14/andant123/caciocavallo_silano.jpg

and robiola (of Roccaverano). This is a quite old cheese too: Pliny (I century a.c.) wrote about it

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff14/andant123/F_roccaverano.jpg