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View Full Version : How far do you stand? REally! how do you win?


Mountainman
10-04-2007, 12:53 AM
How many people play 6 feet away from the baseline and really have to fight for the court? If you do, you probably going through the same problem I'm facing. So if you do stand away from the baseline often, do you practice a lot of passing shots, lobs, drop shots? speed and footwork? or upper body strength and core?

I've been having some tough matches against hard opponents. I'm having a hard time keeping up with my opponents when it boils down to an endurance match. Do you get anxious to finish the point after 6th hit? Do you get frustrated when the opponent is just "warming up", setting up devious points, or (this is my favorite because I really can't do a damn thing) making incredible shots that seem unnatural? The answer to all these questions is "yes" for me. Can I attach a lazer sight to my racquet so I can make more accurate shots? JK

I need help. Thanks!

daddy.dirtsurfer
10-04-2007, 06:20 AM
You just have to play smart. For servers, i always stand back and block it. For rally it's really depending on how you play smartly.

smoothtennis
10-04-2007, 08:32 AM
I stand back from the baseline as I have improved my overall game. Yes, it is a more demanding game, because every step back off the baseline, the opponent has much more angle on you, and you will be covering a lot more court to stay in points. I personally am more like 4 ft. back. The better the opponent, the further back I have to play because of deep heavier balls.

What NTRP level are we talking about here? That makes a difference in how you respond after the point gets started.

At 3.5, I am ready to really move forward, and commit to coming in on any short balls - and following it up with well placed approaches. If not, you stand the risk of being out of position or running yoruself senseless trying to get back for the next shot. Same thing at 4.0.

At 4.5, be ready to stay back a bit more, as the guys hit deeper more consistently and with pace.

You have to look for that 'opportunity ball' as Nick Bolliteri likes to say. Stay in the right position and work....long enough to get that one opportunity ball, then do something with it, and move in some or move in all the way. But see, you can't step in, and hit back a mid court ball, and expect not to get punished by good players. Get them off balance with that one shot, take a step or two in, and punish the next ball with good placement. At this point, you should have taken control of the court via position and angles, and the opponent should be running all over the place to neutralize.

Over the course of the entire match, this is what you have to do. If your fitness is letting you down before this can happen, you either have to get more fit, or play a lower level opponent.

Whatever you do, never give up good basic court positioning because you are playing up or down...do the right thing for the situation. Make them hit the right shots to you, or you punish. You just can't let them hit shorter balls, and not do something or you are in for a marathon running match.

tbini87
10-04-2007, 11:24 AM
do you take the ball on the rise? i stalk the baseline, and at the most play a few feet behind it. i am rarely caught 6 feet behind. practice taking the ball on the rise you that you won't feel uncomfortable with moving up a few feet now and then.

Mountainman
10-05-2007, 07:28 AM
I stand back from the baseline as I have improved my overall game. Yes, it is a more demanding game, because every step back off the baseline, the opponent has much more angle on you, and you will be covering a lot more court to stay in points. I personally am more like 4 ft. back. The better the opponent, the further back I have to play because of deep heavier balls.

What NTRP level are we talking about here? That makes a difference in how you respond after the point gets started.

At 3.5, I am ready to really move forward, and commit to coming in on any short balls - and following it up with well placed approaches. If not, you stand the risk of being out of position or running yoruself senseless trying to get back for the next shot. Same thing at 4.0.

At 4.5, be ready to stay back a bit more, as the guys hit deeper more consistently and with pace.

You have to look for that 'opportunity ball' as Nick Bolliteri likes to say. Stay in the right position and work....long enough to get that one opportunity ball, then do something with it, and move in some or move in all the way. But see, you can't step in, and hit back a mid court ball, and expect not to get punished by good players. Get them off balance with that one shot, take a step or two in, and punish the next ball with good placement. At this point, you should have taken control of the court via position and angles, and the opponent should be running all over the place to neutralize.

Over the course of the entire match, this is what you have to do. If your fitness is letting you down before this can happen, you either have to get more fit, or play a lower level opponent.

Whatever you do, never give up good basic court positioning because you are playing up or down...do the right thing for the situation. Make them hit the right shots to you, or you punish. You just can't let them hit shorter balls, and not do something or you are in for a marathon running match.

This is collegiate tennis or men's open.