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steveirish
10-07-2007, 01:51 PM
I think that most amatuers don't like to have too much time
to hit the ball. I hope you know what I mean.
Do professionals feel the same way.
M

WildVolley
10-07-2007, 04:20 PM
I think that most amatuers don't like to have too much time to hit the ball. I hope you know what I mean.
Do professionals feel the same way?
M

No, professionals don't feel the same way, though a sudden change in pace can throw them off too.

Professionals practice putting away sitters all the time. They use the time to put themselves in an optimal position to hit the ball and it gives them time to force their opponent to make a move, so that they can catch them going the wrong way.

Beginners, and even intermediates, tend to get carried away if a ball gives them too much time, they often go for too much, and usually they don't have enough practice to hit the ball correctly if it is slow and high. Beginners, especially, rely on the pace given to them by a better player, and will often hit out or into the net if they must produce their own power. This is part of the reason you hear people whine about pushers.

steveirish
10-08-2007, 04:15 PM
which is also i guess why players at my level prefer to return a soft ball ball than a hard ball, or why if they are playing doubles in particular, they (including moi) can overhit more
balls than they normally would, Wheras if they are playing a level a bit above them, it can improve their game.
an example of me when i was asked in a A friendly, and put
in second serves that someone remarked were harder than my first serves. That was because i was afraid if I put in my normal soft second serve, it would be killed.
Thank you for responding.

steveirish
10-08-2007, 04:16 PM
oh dear
i meant-prefer returning a hard ball than a soft ball.
Apologies

WildVolley
10-08-2007, 05:42 PM
The way to get comfortable with the slow sitter is to practice hitting them.

It is best to start with someone feeding them to you. Aggressively position yourself with footwork, but don't take a huge swing at the ball. Start out by watching the ball and then putting it into a corner of the court, with plenty of margin for error. Once you can consistently place it where you want, start hitting it harder, but don't get wild. As you get more confidence, practice taking the sitter earlier, when it is higher. It is usually best to still put topspin on the ball, even if you're hitting it down into the court.

steveirish
10-11-2007, 06:24 PM
Thanks for that advice.
M