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vkartikv
10-09-2007, 06:43 PM
Does anyone use continental/Eastern forehands anymore?? Seems like every kid out there is a Western (20%) or Semi-western (80%). Is this what is being stressed by coaches these days?

RoddickAce
10-09-2007, 06:47 PM
Some of my friends use a continental grip, so their shots are extremely flat, I use an in-between eastern-semi western grip(I learned continental at first, then eastern then needed more spin, so I developed this weird grip), at first I thought I was a weirdo cuz it's not fundamentally correct, but later I found out that Fed and some other ppl use it, so I don't feel strange anymore. But ya, I think coaches are generally teching the semi-western more.

Oleg
10-09-2007, 08:45 PM
It is not common to use continental or eastern grip forehand these days but even the top pros still do, mostly the ones with one handed backhand. Richard Gasquet comes to mind. This ususally occurs for players that favor their backhand over the forehand as a weapon.

AznHylite
10-09-2007, 09:58 PM
Gasquet uses a continental grip for his forehand!? I didn't know that.

drhopz
10-09-2007, 10:06 PM
Currently, i am the only one with a semi-western grip among my friends. The ratio is 7:1. I wanted to switch my semi-western to eastern, but the forum convinced me otherwise.

tdk
10-10-2007, 02:52 AM
Currently, i am the only one with a semi-western grip among my friends. The ratio is 7:1. I wanted to switch my semi-western to eastern, but the forum convinced me otherwise.
So the other 7 use western? Why did you want to switch to easern? I use the eastern and Im 45 so maybe Ill just stick to that but just curious....

timokabo
10-10-2007, 09:42 AM
i think that the reason people use the eastern and continental grips less nowadays is due to the fact that most tennis coaches/instructors do not teach or stress the serve and volly technique. also the eastern and continental are more effectively used on mid sized racquets and very few players tend to use this size anymore.

Mahboob Khan
10-10-2007, 10:10 AM
When out of four grand slams, three were played on grass (Australian Open, Wimbledon, U.S. Open), the surface back then was quite fast, and bounce was quite low and skiddy. Thus the surface itself encouraged the players to use continental grip for all of their shots including forehand; and the playing style in vogue was serve and volley (also because players' ground strokes back then were not as solid as today). Continental grip is great for low-bouncing balls!

Now there is only one grass court grand slam tournament i.e. Wimbledon and few curtain-raisers prior to that. Add insult to injury, they have slowed the grass down, and the balls used now a days are quite heavy. All other Grand slam tournaments are played on Clay (French), Australian (Rebound Ace), U.S. Open (Deco Turf). All these surfaces and the types of balls used, result in higher bounces. Semi-western grip is great for higher balls and imparting topspin that keeps the ball inside the court.

In my view, the type of surface teaches the player as to what style of game to play on. For example, red clay, will encourage the player to employ a defensive baseline style; grass will teach the player to use calculated serve and volley style; and synthetic surfaces such as Deco-Turf/Plexipave teach the player to adopt an aggressive baseliner style, or an all court style (Roger Federer).

I also feel that coaches did not teach extreme grips; these grips and the matching swing-paths were evolved by the players themselves. We learned from the players, and then developed a coaching system to teach others.

Mahboob Khan
10-10-2007, 10:15 AM
It is not common to use continental or eastern grip forehand these days but even the top pros still do, mostly the ones with one handed backhand. Richard Gasquet comes to mind. This ususally occurs for players that favor their backhand over the forehand as a weapon.

I doubt it whether Gasquet uses continental for his forehand. His higher point of contact, and swing path -- high-low-high -- does not suggest that he uses continental for his forehand ground stroke.

armand
10-10-2007, 10:58 AM
he said continental or Eastern

Taimur
10-10-2007, 01:20 PM
Salaam Sir,
This is Taimur from your summer coaching camp. I hope all is well back home sir. I've been busy putting all our lessons to the test here on the hardcourts of Champaign.
Reference the discussion on the eastern forehand grip, i was curious to know how i can adjust my style to accomodate balls that land close to the baseline and bounce substantially( i have an eastern grip). I am always at ease with balls that are low, but the high-riser forces me to either take the ball out very early or retrace my footsteps back a few yards.
Sometimes, i find myself adjusting the forehand grip between eastern and semi-western in such situations! I'm eager to get some advice....thanks in advance

VaBeachTennis
10-10-2007, 01:36 PM
he said continental or Eastern

Here's a link where you can judge yourselves:

Click On Gasquet forehand here (http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/pdmediabooks/players.asp?section=players&page=1)

Tennis players use different grips for different shots e.g
SW/EE/W/E or whatever for baseline and higher bounces
Continental for short low balls and volleys
Continental/Eastern for volleys
Continental/ Eastern backhand for serve
Continental sometimes for "squash shot" etc.
I use an EE/SW grip for my baseline game, but sometimes when I get pulled wide during a rallly and have to somewhat stretch to hit the ball, I definitely use a Continental and make it a really "spinny" topsin passing shot down the line or cross court if my opponent rushes the net.
I wish I could use just one grip for every shot (I am experimenting with an extreme SW forehand grip and a SW backhand grip for baseline play) but in my opinion grips tend to be fluid depending on the situation.

Taimur
10-10-2007, 04:48 PM
Fantastic clips....I'm eternally gratefull...finally some good frames of Gasquet's backhand! :p

jasoncho92
10-10-2007, 05:13 PM
I use more of an eastern grip for forehand and im 15 so ya :D

timeisonmyside
10-10-2007, 05:16 PM
I use an Eastern. Maybe you should make a poll.

VaBeachTennis
10-10-2007, 05:59 PM
Fantastic clips....I'm eternally gratefull...finally some good frames of Gasquet's backhand! :p

You are very welcome. Here are some more sources. If you type in www.youtube.com and then type in gasquet backhand in the search box and a bunch will show up, click on this link and the search query is already there and they have Gasquet's backhand in slow motion. Good luck! Just break the videos down in slow motion and try each frame with your racquet and see how it feels, then experiment against a wall or hitting partner. Just have perserverance when you start out and make sure you have the mechanics of the stroke down correctly and you should have good results!

Gasquet's Backhand (http://youtube.com/results?search_query=gasquet+backhand&search=Search)

VaBeachTennis
10-10-2007, 06:04 PM
But really look at this one, this is nice! Look at the fluid power this kid generates!

Gasquet Training (http://youtube.com/watch?v=6g4ic7b5Tt0)

racquet_jedi
10-10-2007, 08:14 PM
I use the eastern forehand grip since my dad taught me to and although I usually hit flat, I can fire it with topspin too.

Frank Silbermann
10-10-2007, 09:05 PM
Here's a link where you can judge yourselves:

Click On Gasquet forehand here (http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/pdmediabooks/players.asp?section=players&page=1)

It's almost an Eastern grip. It's just barely over the line in the direction towards the western grip. In 1972 they would have called it western. It's virtually identical to Bjorn Borg's forehand grip.

tbini87
10-10-2007, 09:36 PM
Here's a link where you can judge yourselves:

Click On Gasquet forehand here (http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/pdmediabooks/players.asp?section=players&page=1)

Tennis players use different grips for different shots e.g
SW/EE/W/E or whatever for baseline and higher bounces
Continental for short low balls and volleys
Continental/Eastern for volleys
Continental/ Eastern backhand for serve
Continental sometimes for "squash shot" etc.
I use an EE/SW grip for my baseline game, but sometimes when I get pulled wide during a rallly and have to somewhat stretch to hit the ball, I definitely use a Continental and make it a really "spinny" topsin passing shot down the line or cross court if my opponent rushes the net.
I wish I could use just one grip for every shot (I am experimenting with an extreme SW forehand grip and a SW backhand grip for baseline play) but in my opinion grips tend to be fluid depending on the situation.


that is an awesome website. thanks for putting that up.

Narcissist
10-11-2007, 04:17 AM
My grip just evolved naturally from eastern to SW when I started to hit with more topspin probably because it is just easier.

Also, kids on hardcourts spend all their time hitting balls at shoulder height (or higher) because they are small so their grip is likely to change to make this easier.

Mahboob Khan
10-11-2007, 05:25 AM
Salaam Sir,
This is Taimur from your summer coaching camp. I hope all is well back home sir. I've been busy putting all our lessons to the test here on the hardcourts of Champaign.
Reference the discussion on the eastern forehand grip, i was curious to know how i can adjust my style to accomodate balls that land close to the baseline and bounce substantially( i have an eastern grip). I am always at ease with balls that are low, but the high-riser forces me to either take the ball out very early or retrace my footsteps back a few yards.
Sometimes, i find myself adjusting the forehand grip between eastern and semi-western in such situations! I'm eager to get some advice....thanks in advance

Well, in such a situation, you can move back a bit, and let the ball drop a bit, and then hit it at your comfort zone which is around your mid-section and in front. I use an eastern Forehand grip, and I can handle balls from waist-height to chest height; obviously, balls inbetween knee-to-midsection level are more ideal to hit with Eastern FH grip.

Taimur
10-11-2007, 12:47 PM
Thank you sir...yes i think i need to work on moving better so that i can comfortably position myself a bit behind the ball...i think the fact that the hardcourts that i'm playing on have been newly-carpeted adds to the extra bounce that i have to deal with.
As a side note, i ordered a carton of Dunlop Grand PriX Hardcourt balls today, as i've heard that they are better suited to regular play on hardcourts than Penn or even US open Wilson.

RoddickAce
10-11-2007, 01:04 PM
He is considered a more clay court styled player, so wouldn't it be kind of hard to use an eastern forehand on clay? But then again, he beat Roddick on grass with an extreme western Backhand grip...so I guess it all just comes down to practice...

cliff
10-11-2007, 02:08 PM
You want to see some awesome clips of Gasquet for free, www.procomparetennis.net has heaps of them plus pretty the biggest selection of free clips on the internet

Mahboob Khan
10-12-2007, 08:52 AM
You want to see some awesome clips of Gasquet for free, www.procomparetennis.net has heaps of them plus pretty the biggest selection of free clips on the internet

Yes, in the Articles Section, the Procompare also has my articles. You can easily print the printable hitting sequencings. They have both: Video, as well as printable hitting sequencings.