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batakdepores
10-11-2007, 11:11 AM
We all know that pros (especially top ones) restring their racquets after every practice, or at least that what I read in tennis magazines. However, at recreational level, I have heard my friends telling me how frequently they restring their racquets (every two weeks/six hours of play), regardless if the string popped or not.

I personally use multi string (NXT Tour 17) and use it even when it start to rout. I use multi because of its feel and the fact that with my game I won't get a surprise string pop as I will only expect a pop as it deteriorate. Yes, of course I can feel the freshly restrung racquet's pop but as the string deriorated I only notice the falling tension, not necessarily the "deadness" of the string. Comment coming from a friend who doesn't necessarily have a touch game, what do you guys think he means when he says he feels the string is dead? Is it just mental?

LuckyR
10-11-2007, 12:13 PM
There are as many schools of thought on this issue as there are players. Many stringers and shops recommend changing as many times a year as hours you play a week. Personally I feel the answerthat is best for you depends on what string you use, your style of play and your wallet size.

If you use gut and perhaps multifilament, many touch players (like myself) like the "grippiness" when the string starts to fray, so many say they like the feel best right before breakage.

The monofilaments (that do not fray) do not have this issue and many only gauge replacement by the "pop" of the tension. You will notice this but synthetics are known for losing that much more quickly than gut.

batakdepores
10-11-2007, 12:52 PM
LuckyR,

Thanks for the reply and now I don't feel so crazy anymore thinking I do like the feeling of fraying multi (a little softer from less tension and more bite like you said). My teammates cringed when I pulled out my racquet with fraying multi for a sectional championship match.

So, it's still make me wonder how a player playing 4 hours a week (maximum) will have to restring a racquet when he plays as hard as me and hit mostly serves, return of serves, flat overheads, and block volleys, while stringing his racquet with a 16 gauge (compared to my 17 multi). Can a non-touch player actually feel the deadness of his string?

LuckyR
10-11-2007, 01:47 PM
My understanding from my research is that synthetic multifilament loses it's tension pretty quick (compared to gut) so you should string it a bit higher than where you want the majority of it's life to be. Other than that I would agree with your plan of playing until breakage, as you are a touch player.

Since gut loses tension slower, I don't string a lot higher than where I want the string to be the majority of the time.

If you are breaking strings in about 3 months then you are conforming to the "standard" advice.

As to feeling the deadness, various people will claim various things, but most power players who are using monofilament will have strings that deaden extremely quickly, to the point where noticing "deadness" on month old strings is probably not real and is imagined. Besides the whole point of Kevlar and poly is to use a dead string to start with so the whole "dead string" idea is a bit of a farce anyway.

LES
10-11-2007, 02:53 PM
As to feeling the deadness, various people will claim various things, but most power players who are using monofilament will have strings that deaden extremely quickly, to the point where noticing "deadness" on month old strings is probably not real and is imagined. Besides the whole point of Kevlar and poly is to use a dead string to start with so the whole "dead string" idea is a bit of a farce anyway.

I respectfully disagree with this and if you post the same question in the strings board you'll probably have a lot of people who also disagree.

LuckyR
10-11-2007, 03:20 PM
I respectfully disagree with this and if you post the same question in the strings board you'll probably have a lot of people who also disagree.

I have no doubt that your prediction is correct. However, I was more commenting on my understanding of the properties of the materials I mentioned (rapid tension loss) rather than personal experience with the string, since I don't use it. I admit I inserted opinion unencumbered by experience into my last sentance and will defer to power players who are fully aware of their goals.

Of course, some folks will use the term "deadness" to describe initial tension loss, and others (more experienced) will try to distinguish between known initial tension loss and a later "deadness" feeling that creeps into their stringbed (or perhaps their mind) over an extended time. These individuals will disagree with one another as they are using one term to describe two issues.

Bagumbawalla
10-11-2007, 05:46 PM
Well, you have a lot of things to sort throgh and figure out so I will try not to be theoretical, but since I use the exact same string as you-- here is what I do.

I string my racket a couple pounds heavier and, after about 15/20 minutes or so of hard practice, they soften up, somewhat, to what I am used to. They remain at pretty much the same tension (as far as I can tell) until they begin to fray and (if I continue to use them) I notice they become more springy- if anything livelier rather than "dead". So, when I notice the first signs of splittiing, I have them restrung.

lilxjohnyy
10-11-2007, 05:55 PM
my string usually break in 4-6 hours ... idont mind restringing since i love my string combo

batakdepores
10-11-2007, 07:16 PM
My understanding from my research is that synthetic multifilament loses it's tension pretty quick (compared to gut) so you should string it a bit higher than where you want the majority of it's life to be. Other than that I would agree with your plan of playing until breakage, as you are a touch player.

Since gut loses tension slower, I don't string a lot higher than where I want the string to be the majority of the time.

If you are breaking strings in about 3 months then you are conforming to the "standard" advice.

As to feeling the deadness, various people will claim various things, but most power players who are using monofilament will have strings that deaden extremely quickly, to the point where noticing "deadness" on month old strings is probably not real and is imagined. Besides the whole point of Kevlar and poly is to use a dead string to start with so the whole "dead string" idea is a bit of a farce anyway.


So, I can assume then the dead feeling is not from a multi string, because from my experience, because of the loss of tension in multi stringing, the power increased as well.
Which brings me to a somewhat off topic question, does lower tension means less topspin?
That said, I'm still confused or perhaps never experienced the "deadness" of a string, unless someone describe it in more detail what it feels like.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 11:32 AM
So, I can assume then the dead feeling is not from a multi string, because from my experience, because of the loss of tension in multi stringing, the power increased as well.
Which brings me to a somewhat off topic question, does lower tension means less topspin?
That said, I'm still confused or perhaps never experienced the "deadness" of a string, unless someone describe it in more detail what it feels like.

It makes sense that as a multi starts to fray that it's properties would change somewhat. Some may use the word "deadness", others may find the stringbed more springy and get more "pop". Myself, as my strings fray there is an improvement in grippiness at the cost of a bit of pop, but is a compromise I am willing to make, so I don't restring.

Kevo
10-12-2007, 12:47 PM
I playtested at least 50 different strings of all types before finally settling on one string full time. I playtested multiple kinds of every string type, gut, poly, nylon, nylon multi, poly multi, poly ribbon, and zyex. I can tell you that almost every string of varying construction plays differently and loses tension and resilience differently. Many multis do in fact play well until they break. Many syn guts do as well. There are many strings however that change feel constantly over their lifetime. These are the strings I liked the least. In the end my favorite strings were strings that changed feel very little over their lifetime and lasted more than a week for me. Some strings only lasted a couple of hours and some of those played great, but I didn't want to restring my frames every week either. I found NXT to be fine until it broke. Of course that was only a couple of weeks for me so it may not weather as well over a few months. However, I did like Klipper Zyex and Yonex 850 better than NXT with Klipper Zyex 17 my top choice for a multi. Keep in mind though that if you change strings, you have to adjust tension as well. I tried most strings at least twice if they seemed promising at all just to make sure I got the best tension for the string. Also, the final point and probably the most important. String preference is a feel thing and that is different for everyone. Don't let me or anyone else tell you how a string feels to you. If you like it then it's a good choice.

ClayisFun
10-12-2007, 12:56 PM
So, I can assume then the dead feeling is not from a multi string, because from my experience, because of the loss of tension in multi stringing, the power increased as well.
Which brings me to a somewhat off topic question, does lower tension means less topspin?
That said, I'm still confused or perhaps never experienced the "deadness" of a string, unless someone describe it in more detail what it feels like.

I use a poly, weisscannon silverstring, and I start noticing a "dead" feel after a bit. "Dead" strings lack the crispness of fresh ones. It is really hard to explain. Also, if you like the way your strings play right before they break then you aren't going to feel any "deadness" because the only reason you describe a string as "dead" is because it's playability has changed for the worse.

If you really want to experience "dead" strings find a racquet that hasn't been restrung in a year or so and hit with it. Maybe that will give you an idea.;)

TennezSport
10-12-2007, 01:42 PM
Most string gets that dead feeling when they have reached their maximum elongation phase. When strings are new, you can feel the string pocket the ball and then snap back to their original position. This is the pop everyone talks about. However, after some time and usage, string loses the ability to snap back as it is totally stretched out (elongated) and thus results in the "dead" feeling players talk about. The string may or may not break depending on the type of player, tension and sting composition.

Some people also claim that they have to hit harder to get the old feeling, and this is because the string is not responding. The string can also become a little unpredictable as resiliency is lost. This can lead to tennis elbow or other problems, depending on the string and players technique. So how often you re-string is completely up to the individual and how much you need your racquet to perform well. This is why the pros string so often.

TennezSport :cool:

LES
10-12-2007, 03:23 PM
Most string gets that dead feeling when they have reached their maximum elongation phase. When strings are new, you can feel the string pocket the ball and then snap back to their original position. This is the pop everyone talks about. However, after some time and usage, string loses the ability to snap back as it is totally stretched out (elongated) and thus results in the "dead" feeling players talk about. The string may or may not break depending on the type of player, tension and sting composition.

This is really good explanation.

Deadness is not imagined, it's something that happens because the elastic properties of the strings change as they age. It's not as apparent with gut as it is with syn gut and especially poly. Multi's in general are better than syn gut & poly but worse than gut. But Wilson Sensation was one of the worst strings I've ever tried. It went dead faster than any poly or syn gut I've used.

I used to use gut but switched to poly. Gut lasts me 3-4 months & I use it until it breaks. With poly, I get 2-3 weeks of playability before I have to cut out the strings due to deadness. Either way it costs the same, but I can play better with poly and the regular restringing feels more consistent.

If you like the feeling of the strings before they break then you always have to wait until you get to that stage. Isn't it better to find a string that you like when fresh so you can always get that feeling every time you restring?

Frank Silbermann
10-12-2007, 03:51 PM
For strings that continually stretch, I periodically add string-savers to tighten the strings. Eventually the strings stop stretching; if they're less powerful then that gives me more control with my wide-body racket. (I use a wide-body because the "players' rackets" feel dead a the tip.)

If you like the feeling of the strings before they break then you always have to wait until you get to that stage. Isn't it better to find a string that you like when fresh so you can always get that feeling every time you restring? No, because the feeling I get before the break is there for the entire month before they break.