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tdad
10-12-2007, 05:36 AM
I need to learn how to construct points. Can anyone suggest a book or website that will help me with this part of the game? Thanks in advance.

Mahboob Khan
10-12-2007, 09:10 AM
USTA's "Winning Patterns of Play" is great. There are so many good sites on tennis. My favorite is: www.tennisplayer.net. ITF's www.tennisicoach.com is free.

Here are some rules based on my experience as a player and coach:

First serve: Hit it flat and powerful with ability to hit wide, up the T and body;

Second serve: Hit it with topspin/kicker with ability to hit wide, up the T and body.

Return of Serve:

Difficult/deep, return it cross court or deep down the middle;
Second/easier: return it down the line and be aggressive.

Rallying from the Baseline:

If the ball is deep/difficult, hit cross court or deep down the middle;
If the ball is easier, hit down the line;
If the ball is easier/shorter in the right zone, hit it down the line and close in;
If the ball is easier/shorter in the left zone, hit it down the line and close in,
If the ball is easier/shorter in the mid-court, use insideout and insidein combinations.

Passing Shots (your opponent at the net)

Keep your passing shots low and dipping;
Cross court or down the line? Depent on your opponent's location and your ability to make the shot.

If you cannot pass right away; use 1-2-3 combination: First slice cross court low; forcing him to volley up, you move in, and pass on next opportunity.

The above are golden rules. As you get experience of your own, you will come up with some other solutions.

johnny ballgame
10-12-2007, 09:10 AM
Just play more matches, it will come. In the meantime, try these combinations:

1. Serve out wide in the duece court, hit first ground stroke firmly to the same corner (wrongfooting your oppenent who is trying to recover to the middle), follow to the net and short angle volley away to the open court (if your opponent was able to get the first groundie back).

2. Serve out wide in the duece court, hit first groundie deep to opposite corner, follow to net and short angle volley to the open court.

3. Hit short angle groundie to one side, hit next ball firmly up the line to the opposite corner, follow to net for a short angle volley to open court.

4. Hit a short slice or a dropshot, lob next ball over opponents backhand shoulder, follow to net for an overhead or volley.

That should get you started. You will figure out some of your own combos that work well.

cliff
10-12-2007, 12:48 PM
Chuck Kriese the Clemson coach has written a very good book called ' coaching tennis' It has a chapter on the Wardlaw directionals that give very simple set plays for pretty much every game situation.
Tennisplayer.net tennisone.com are good sites for info.
If you want a free site that has some good articles check out www.procomparetennis.net it also has very good video clips

Geezer Guy
10-12-2007, 12:53 PM
"Think To Win" by Alan Fox (I think) has good info about constructing points. The book may appear a bit old-school, but the information is still good today.

I remember reading it after I'd been playing a couple of years and having several "a-ha" moments.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 01:34 PM
Pressure Tennis

Mahboob Khan
10-12-2007, 08:49 PM
Just play more matches, it will come. In the meantime, try these combinations:

1. Serve out wide in the duece court, hit first ground stroke firmly to the same corner (wrongfooting your oppenent who is trying to recover to the middle), follow to the net and short angle volley away to the open court (if your opponent was able to get the first groundie back).

2. Serve out wide in the duece court, hit first groundie deep to opposite corner, follow to net and short angle volley to the open court.

3. Hit short angle groundie to one side, hit next ball firmly up the line to the opposite corner, follow to net for a short angle volley to open court.

4. Hit a short slice or a dropshot, lob next ball over opponents backhand shoulder, follow to net for an overhead or volley.

That should get you started. You will figure out some of your own combos that work well.


Depend on his abilities. He can at least start trying yours and mine and keep on discovering the tennis world for himself. As his technique and movement improves, he will be able to incorporate some of the above suggestions.

Bagumbawalla
10-12-2007, 09:47 PM
The above suggestions are good, but consider this.

Go to your local mega bookstore. There you will find a half dozen books (at least) on strategy, court sense, percentage play, tactics and so on. Gather up the books you think apply to your situation.

Now, find a table and buy a big coffe drink with whipped cream and browse through the volumes. You might even find one you like well enough to buy.

Mahboob Khan
10-14-2007, 07:00 PM
Also in your spare time watch tennis matches; or simply watch Roger Federer because he is the master of constructing points:

-- Watch what he does with his serve -- first and second;
-- Watch what he does with return of serve -- first and second;
-- Watch what he does when he rallys from baseline;
-- Watch on which ball he attacks and goes to the net;
-- Watch how he defends/passes.

junbumkim
10-14-2007, 07:45 PM
you can read some books on that....
Whatever is suggested above is general guideline you can follow.
You have to apply this to your strength and your opponent's weakness.
It will also depend on your level of play.

Take some lessons and do drills that capitalizes on your strength.

Generally, anything at and below 4.0, more consistency will win you the point.

Mahboob Khan
10-15-2007, 07:21 PM
Books, Tennis Magazine, instructional sites, tennis lessons, playing experience, watching tennis matches, etc.