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danielpreston
10-12-2007, 07:00 AM
Two unis came after me with an offer of a tennis scholarship, but I turned them down on the basis that they were not academic enough. Was I right?

The two unis had a SAT 75% percentile level of 1120 and 1150.

I took SAT almost a year early (well before my 18th birthday) and got 1250 (Math & CR). Good but not amazing.

My marketing manager here in the UK disagreed with me, saying that 1120, 1150 and 1250 are all in the same ball park and that I should expect no difference on the campus academically.

I'm puzzled! Who's right?

heartman
10-12-2007, 07:05 AM
Marketing manager is correct - your choice is what you make of it. Consider location, size, level of competition, academic offerings, and gut feeling equal in your search for a university. It appears you have some skills other people want and are willing to pay for(scholarship) - use your head, look at the big picture, and trust your gut instinct.

And one last thing, aim high. Do some research and determine what your first choice would be if there were no obstacles - when you aim high, second and third on the list are usually pretty good as well.

Nuke
10-12-2007, 07:07 AM
Well, that's all up to you, isn't it? If your intended career is as a tennis pro, then go with the best tennis school. If a tennis scholarship is just a tool to get you into a good academic school for a career other than tennis, then go with the best academic school that will still give the scholarship.

danielpreston
10-12-2007, 08:21 AM
Well, that's all up to you, isn't it? If your intended career is as a tennis pro, then go with the best tennis school. If a tennis scholarship is just a tool to get you into a good academic school for a career other than tennis, then go with the best academic school that will still give the scholarship.

I'm really asking a question about the academic standard of US colleges and universities.

Is a college with a benchmark SAT 1250 as its 75% percentile, only negligibly different from another college with benchmark SAT 1120 college; because both colleges are really in the same academic ball park with similar students

This is what my marketing manager was advising.

Do you agree that the difference is negligible?

Kaptain Karl
10-12-2007, 08:34 AM
I'm really asking a question about the academic standard of US colleges and universities.

<snip>

Do you agree that the difference is negligible?I agree with your manager.

In all the years since I graduated from college not a single person has asked to see my diploma. Colleges and universities want you to think "their sheepskin" is more valuable than "some other schools' diplomas." This is (largely) a bunch of hooey.

I suggest you decide what four-to-five factors are important for your university. Rank your choices in those areas (satisfying the Logical side of your personality) ... then "go with your gut."

- KK

Fee
10-12-2007, 08:41 AM
Why did you turn them down so early? Players usually gather all the information they can, do campus visits, and stay in touch with coaches for months before they make their final decision. You should be keeping this going until the last possible minute.

Also, you are the first person I've heard who places so much emphasis on the SAT score to pick a university. University of California at Berkeley is supposed to be one of the most prestigious campuses in the country, but I chose not to go there because I prefered smaller classes and wanted to be taught by professors not their TA's. You have to look at the quality of the education you will get overall, and the SAT scores of the students they accept does not help you determine that.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 09:16 AM
Two unis came after me with an offer of a tennis scholarship, but I turned them down on the basis that they were not academic enough. Was I right?

The two unis had a SAT 75% percentile level of 1120 and 1150.

I took SAT almost a year early (well before my 18th birthday) and got 1250 (Math & CR). Good but not amazing.

My marketing manager here in the UK disagreed with me, saying that 1120, 1150 and 1250 are all in the same ball park and that I should expect no difference on the campus academically.

I'm puzzled! Who's right?

There is not enough information in your post to say.

You don't mention your field of study. A campus that has a top notch Engineering school might be mediocre in many other areas etc. Also in certain fields, like Law a school might not have a strong program, but if you want to settle in a certain city, the lawyers in that city might all be from that school and going there would help with getting positions there.

This is too nuanced of a question to answer without much more information.

danielpreston
10-12-2007, 09:22 AM
There is not enough information in your post to say.

You don't mention your field of study. A campus that has a top notch Engineering school might be mediocre in many other areas etc. Also in certain fields, like Law a school might not have a strong program, but if you want to settle in a certain city, the lawyers in that city might all be from that school and going there would help with getting positions there.

This is too nuanced of a question to answer without much more information.

I'm looking to major in Mathematics. I'm not good enough to be a tennis pro. Miracles do happen though.

Fee
10-12-2007, 09:38 AM
If you already know what you want to major in (are you planning to become a Mathematics teacher?), then that is what you need to focus on when selecting a school, not the SAT scores. Just about every university in the states has a website, and that website should give you information about all of the Majors, including biographies of the instructors. Start there. If the instructors look qualified, then try to schedule a campus visit. I know that is tough for you in England, but you may just have to schedule a trip here to see 3 or 4 universities to help you make your final decision.

You should go back and look at those two Uni's you rejected. Wouldn't surprise me if one of them had a very strong Math department.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 10:42 AM
I'm looking to major in Mathematics. I'm not good enough to be a tennis pro. Miracles do happen though.

So are you going to do Academic Research or try to get into IT? If the latter, your University choice might not be all that important so you could use things like: weather, ratio of cute girls, tennis team and quality of parties in your decision. If the former, you are going to need to get into a top Grad school so a "Big Name" school where you can do research with a Big Name prof and get a Letter of Recommendation that will open all of the doors for you is what you should choose.

danielpreston
10-12-2007, 11:10 AM
So are you going to do Academic Research or try to get into IT? If the latter, your University choice might not be all that important so you could use things like: weather, ratio of cute girls, tennis team and quality of parties in your decision. If the former, you are going to need to get into a top Grad school so a "Big Name" school where you can do research with a Big Name prof and get a Letter of Recommendation that will open all of the doors for you is what you should choose.

I'm undecided ... probably go into banking, stock exchange, insurance; loads of these jobs in London. Brighton (where I live) is a commuter area for the capitol. Definitely not interested in IT, almost certainly no research either.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 11:14 AM
I'm undecided ... probably go into banking, stock exchange, insurance; loads of these jobs in London. Brighton (where I live) is a commuter area for the capitol. Definitely not interested in IT, almost certainly no research either.

Okkaaaay... then I am baffled by the choice of Mathematics if you are going into Business Administration...

tennis-n-sc
10-12-2007, 11:17 AM
I'm undecided ... probably go into banking, stock exchange, insurance; loads of these jobs in London. Brighton (where I live) is a commuter area for the capitol. Definitely not interested in IT, almost certainly no research either.

Based on this info, I would recommend a major in Finance, which will be much more helpful than a degree in math. You would then be looking for a school with a good Business Department and leaning toward a B.S. degree, not B.A. Just my two cents. Many small schools have great business departments.

max
10-12-2007, 11:44 AM
Fee's right. So's Karl, re: "prestige". I think if you're not in the Ivys, then everything else is pretty much considered everything else. I went to a school said to have prestige, but it was worthless in real life: personal and family connections count for a ton!

Math education might be U of Chicago; they've done a lot of the research in this area.

danielpreston
10-12-2007, 12:23 PM
Okkaaaay... then I am baffled by the choice of Mathematics if you are going into Business Administration...

Maybe things are a little different and less vocationally focussed here in the UK.

I want to do Math major, because I'm good at it, it's fun, it won't take too much study time and leave me loadsa time for tennis. Here in the UK, a Math degree will get you loads of places. Simply the degree is a ticket to say that you're of a certain intellectual capability.:)

danielpreston
10-12-2007, 12:26 PM
"You should go back and look at those two Uni's you rejected. Wouldn't surprise me if one of them had a very strong Math department."

How can you tell that a uni has a strong Math dept by looking at the web site? Genuine question. Please help!

Fee
10-12-2007, 12:54 PM
You can't always tell, but there are things to look for - the size of the faculty, the number of courses offered, the published works of the professors, the number of students in the major, the peer awards given to the program, all kinds of things. Once you focus on a campus or two, there are all kinds of professor rating websites in the US where the students post their opinions of the courses and such.

There are so many factors to consider in choosing a university, I'm still kind of stunned that you turned down a free education based on a bizarre statistic like SAT scores.

By the way, you didn't take your SAT exam early. Many Americans take them when they are 16 or 17 so that they can re-take them if necessary, but you have a pretty decent score.

LarougeNY
10-12-2007, 01:08 PM
Two unis came after me with an offer of a tennis scholarship, but I turned them down on the basis that they were not academic enough. Was I right?

The two unis had a SAT 75% percentile level of 1120 and 1150.

I took SAT almost a year early (well before my 18th birthday) and got 1250 (Math & CR). Good but not amazing.

My marketing manager here in the UK disagreed with me, saying that 1120, 1150 and 1250 are all in the same ball park and that I should expect no difference on the campus academically.

I'm puzzled! Who's right?

Wait, didn't you take the new sat's out of 2400?

Anyway, if you look up the college handbooks from like princeton review or collegeboard, they stress that anything from 1150 to 1300 are in the same boat. You'll probably get more offers if you've already gotten two already, but chances are that a very academic school isn't going to offer a scholarship. I know the top schools, many of them, don't offer athletic scholarships.

p.s. most people take the sats in their junior year, well before they're 18, usually 16.

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 01:13 PM
Fee's right. So's Karl, re: "prestige". I think if you're not in the Ivys, then everything else is pretty much considered everything else. I went to a school said to have prestige, but it was worthless in real life: personal and family connections count for a ton!

Math education might be U of Chicago; they've done a lot of the research in this area.

Let me guess... you're from the Northeast...

LuckyR
10-12-2007, 01:17 PM
Maybe things are a little different and less vocationally focussed here in the UK.

I want to do Math major, because I'm good at it, it's fun, it won't take too much study time and leave me loadsa time for tennis. Here in the UK, a Math degree will get you loads of places. Simply the degree is a ticket to say that you're of a certain intellectual capability.:)

No doubt getting a Math degree will show you are a bright guy. Of course getting a Business degree will impress business types and many would consider it much easier as a major than Math. BTW if you aren't really going to use the Math degree (in the field of Mathematics) then who cares if it is a strong department or not? Might as well get a free ride, IMO.

Even though you don't need it, the key info to determining a strong Dept is how easily did the undergrads get into Grad programs.

goober
10-12-2007, 01:21 PM
You should be careful turning down scholarships unless you are certain that you are going to get an offer from a better school. Just my 2 bits.

1250 (Old SAT) is actually pretty decent for a University academic average. If you want go to a University that has SATs in the 1350+ you are starting to hit elite level academic levels and the chances of getting a tennis scholarship are going to be limited.

danielpreston
10-13-2007, 12:29 AM
You should be careful turning down scholarships unless you are certain that you are going to get an offer from a better school. Just my 2 bits.

1250 (Old SAT) is actually pretty decent for a University academic average. If you want go to a University that has SATs in the 1350+ you are starting to hit elite level academic levels and the chances of getting a tennis scholarship are going to be limited.

Maybe I'm wrong ... this is the way I've been thinking. USNEWS.com divides colleges into 4 categories.

1. Less selective (most under SAT 1000),
2. Selective (most under SAT 1200);
3. More selective (most under SAT 1350);
4. Most selective (elite schools)

I refused the two universities because they came in category 2 and I wanted category 3.

What most of you are suggesting is that Category 2 & 3 are really much the same.

Any comments?

tennis-n-sc
10-13-2007, 03:50 AM
Maybe I'm wrong ... this is the way I've been thinking. USNEWS.com divides colleges into 4 categories.

1. Less selective (most under SAT 1000),
2. Selective (most under SAT 1200);
3. More selective (most under SAT 1350);
4. Most selective (elite schools)

I refused the two universities because they came in category 2 and I wanted category 3.

What most of you are suggesting is that Category 2 & 3 are really much the same.

Any comments?

The U.S. News ranking system has come under scrutiny of late. Not necessarily because of the schools that make their lists but by the ommision of the many great schools that do not.

In the end, it will matter most where you personally feel comfortable. If you are at an elite school but are miserable, what have you accomplished? If you haven't toured schools in the U.S., you should do so. There will be many stark contrasts with those that you are familiar with in the U.K.

Joeyg
10-13-2007, 05:15 AM
Fee, I thought your thinly veiled criticism of Cal was quite funny. Not all classes are taught by TA's or number in the 100's. Some of us actually had a decent experience there, albeit in my case it was only for one year.

On a side note, have you nailed down the Wimbledon trip for next year?

goober
10-13-2007, 05:28 AM
Maybe I'm wrong ... this is the way I've been thinking. USNEWS.com divides colleges into 4 categories.

1. Less selective (most under SAT 1000),
2. Selective (most under SAT 1200);
3. More selective (most under SAT 1350);
4. Most selective (elite schools)

I refused the two universities because they came in category 2 and I wanted category 3.

What most of you are suggesting is that Category 2 & 3 are really much the same.

Any comments?

I would agree that in many cases there is overlap between the schools you put in category 2 and 3. Once you are outside of the well known elite universities, academic reputations become blurred and not as easily distinguished. In general you may be better off at a larger university since it has a chance of being better known when you go back to the UK and they will likley have a larger math department with more students/faculty.

I agree with SC that you should really try to visit these universities if possible because location and environment will play a part in how happy you will be there for 4 years. Many smaller colleges or located out in the boonies in the middle of nowhere and the students may be a very homogeneous bunch that don't mesh with you.

Fee
10-13-2007, 08:31 AM
Fee, I thought your thinly veiled criticism of Cal was quite funny. Not all classes are taught by TA's or number in the 100's. Some of us actually had a decent experience there, albeit in my case it was only for one year.

On a side note, have you nailed down the Wimbledon trip for next year?

I wasn't bashing Cal, I was demonstrating that the use of statistics did not determine the college that was the best fit for me. And in my major, I would have been taught by a few TA's (I had a friend there in the same major, at the same time) and in very large classes. Turns out, I was taught by a few Grad students at my college of choice anyway. There was a bit of a personnel problem the summer before I arrived and 3 professors bailed on the program just as I was moving in to my apartment.

I'll deal with my trip to Wimbledon in April. Too much to do before then. :)


Daniel,
We're all trying to help you with your college choices based on some pretty vague information. Perhaps you should give us more details about what you are looking for. Obviously, you want a university with a strong Mathematics department and perhaps a decent Business/Finance department as well if you want to take a minor or just a few classes of interest. What else are you looking for? Class size? Size of student body? Fraternities? Big city with diverse population? Small city with no distractions? A campus of mostly White, Christian, Middle-class kids? Good weather? Snow, or complete lack of snow? International Students? Close to a major airport?

onehandbh
10-13-2007, 09:38 AM
It would greatly help if you named the universities. (also hopefully future
offers). b/c chances are that somebody has either gone to one of them
or knows someone (or people) that have. Though it's too late now,
just out of curiosity, what were the two you turned down?

The other possibility is to also, try to transfer to a top school for
math. Might also consider being an actuary.

danielpreston
10-13-2007, 10:53 AM
I've shortlisted some colleges based on SAT scores and the fact that they are urban or suburban location.

I've eliminated all ranked D1 ... remember I'm a 5.0 that's why.

Butler University
Duquesne University
Fairfield University
Loyola Marymount University
Marquette University
Rockhurst University
Rollins College
St. Louis University
Stetson University
University of Dayton
University of Denver
Wofford College

I've no idea about how good they are for Math & Business or indeed whether they are the right standard for my tennis.

I do need to get a good scholarship at least 50%

What do you think of the above?

Fee
10-13-2007, 03:32 PM
LMU in Southern California is close to the beach, close to LAX, and all the other amenities that Los Angeles has to offer. I've heard that it's a decent school overall, but I don't know anything about their Math program or their tennis team. Housing could be expensive there, and you will probably need a car to go anywhere off-campus. It could be a very good choice for you, at least the weather is almost always nice.

cghipp
10-13-2007, 04:08 PM
Daniel - My dad played tennis for Wofford! Best thing about going there: Chili Cheese A-Plenty at the Beacon restaurant. (Also, close to Asheville, NC - a great place to visit.)

tennis-n-sc
10-14-2007, 05:36 AM
Daniel - My dad played tennis for Wofford! Best thing about going there: Chili Cheese A-Plenty at the Beacon restaurant. (Also, close to Asheville, NC - a great place to visit.)

CG, how nice. Wofford is a great school, private of course, with a steady tennis program that competes in a really good conference. The coach is a nice guy that handles both the women's and men's team. Daniel, if you are in fact a 5.0, you can play at Wofford and other schools in the Southern Conference, such as Furman, Western Carolina, Appalachiain State, College of Charleston and others. The Citidel is also in the conference which is a military school with great academics, but you gotta love to get up at 4:30 A.M. All are very good schools and about half of them are private. Small student enrollments of between 2,000 and 4,000. All are co-ed (nice :D ). All are located in a great area with lots to do. Most have very good to excellent academic standards. Most of the tennis teams have an international roster for both women and men. Go for it.

movdqa
10-14-2007, 06:54 AM
A few comments:

- Business majors have done very well in the financial bubble that has engulfed the world since the late 1990s. The collapse of the mortgage bubble is taking a lot of jobs in the financial industry with it including huge bonuses.
- If you want to study math, check into the program. Send emails to the department head and ask him about the strength of his program compared to the other schools that you're interested in. If you have subspecialties that you're interested in, mention that too.
- Economics tends to be the business area that is heaviest in math. I think that Finance is next. Perhaps a focus in those two areas would fulfill your need for math.
- You might try for a major in one and a minor in the other or a dual-major. I think that dual-major is hard if you'll be playing on the tennis team.
- A school can have students that aren't the best quality with professors and programs that are top-notch. In those cases, the professors have to teach to a wide range of students. If you want more of a challenge, it's up to you to go after it. A good school/professor should have research opportunities for students if it is a research institution.
- Be careful about turning down large offers of money. If you get in and do very well academically, it will be easier to transfer into schools with better average SAT scores, higher 4-year graduation rates and better reputations. The admissions environment is a lot less competitive for transfer students than enter freshmen.

marklbucla
10-14-2007, 10:15 PM
Though my ongoing college education, I've been to three different schools at three different levels, for Applied Math/Statistics, coincidentally. I even took Freshmen level Multi-variable Calculus with Terry Tao!

I can say that going to a higher ranked school at the undergrad level DOES NOT mean that you'll get a better education, only that there will be more competition sitting next to you (And thus, harder exams). At the weakest school, I felt that I learned the most. At the strongest school, I felt that I learned the least. This is because the lower ranked schools overall have less of a "publish or perish" atmosphere, so they're more focused on teaching, rather than their own research.

I agree with the other posters who have said that it's short sided to reject a school purely based on SAT statistics. Instead of asking which schools are the best, it's really about which one will get you the furthest. For me, going to a low-ranked school was easily the best career move that I've made, while going to the top notch school did nothing for my career.

lethalfang
10-14-2007, 11:08 PM
I've shortlisted some colleges based on SAT scores and the fact that they are urban or suburban location.

I've eliminated all ranked D1 ... remember I'm a 5.0 that's why.

Butler University
Duquesne University
Fairfield University
Loyola Marymount University
Marquette University
Rockhurst University
Rollins College
St. Louis University
Stetson University
University of Dayton
University of Denver
Wofford College

I've no idea about how good they are for Math & Business or indeed whether they are the right standard for my tennis.

I do need to get a good scholarship at least 50%

What do you think of the above?

Marquette is not D-1?
They sure have D-1 basketball, playing in the Big East Conference.

junbumkim
10-15-2007, 12:51 AM
It's about what you really want.
Average SAT score of university can be misleading.
For example, a big state university is going to have wide range of students, anyone from SAT scores of 1500 to 1100. Their average may just be somewhere around 1100s. Whereas you go Ivy league, their SAT score maybe a lot higher. Also if you go small local private university, the sat score might be around 1000, or 1100s. Is there a difference in level of education between a small private univ and a big state univ? Yes, I think so. Big state univ will probably be more challenging and provide you with more opportinuties.

junbumkim
10-15-2007, 12:53 AM
Also if you major in Math in undergrad and gointo finance in grad school, that can be a very lucrative combination. Espcially if you go into stock exchange or investment.

This came from a math professor....BUT the economy has to be good.

With B.S in math, your imminent career option maybe limited, but if you seek further education in grad school, it's a different story.

onehandbh
10-15-2007, 02:21 AM
I've shortlisted some colleges based on SAT scores and the fact that they are urban or suburban location.

I've eliminated all ranked D1 ... remember I'm a 5.0 that's why.

Butler University
Duquesne University
Fairfield University
Loyola Marymount University
Marquette University
Rockhurst University
Rollins College
St. Louis University
Stetson University
University of Dayton
University of Denver
Wofford College

I've no idea about how good they are for Math & Business or indeed whether they are the right standard for my tennis.

I do need to get a good scholarship at least 50%

What do you think of the above?

LMU is just okay, IMO for math.
I think you should consider D2 schools as well.
There are lots of good (academically) D2 schools. Not sure which
ones would give you a scholarship though. Personally, I would
rather go to a school that's a little bigger than just 2 - 3000 people.
But that's just me.

You can also try to see which undergrad universities have the
most people getting into the top math PhD programs. The schools
with good engineering and computer science programs most likely
have good math departments as well. Might want to consider
schools like, Harvey Mudd, MIT. Maybe UCSD.

Thud and blunder
10-15-2007, 02:32 AM
It depends on your medium term plan. You seemed to suggest you were eyeing up leveraging your maths degree into a City gig. If you're planning on landing a front office gig in the City with a maths degree from one of those unis, you're going to struggle like hell.

Competition for places in FO is huge; understandable given the potential payouts; not having any deltailed knowledge of those schools, but I've been on both sides of City hiring, and I'm pretty sure those schools won't cut the mustard.

movdqa
10-15-2007, 05:40 AM
LMU is just okay, IMO for math.
I think you should consider D2 schools as well.
There are lots of good (academically) D2 schools. Not sure which
ones would give you a scholarship though. Personally, I would
rather go to a school that's a little bigger than just 2 - 3000 people.
But that's just me.

You can also try to see which undergrad universities have the
most people getting into the top math PhD programs. The schools
with good engineering and computer science programs most likely
have good math departments as well. Might want to consider
schools like, Harvey Mudd, MIT. Maybe UCSD.

MIT's average SAT score is 1466.

Rui
10-15-2007, 10:54 AM
If you're aiming for an advanced degree, then do well at a scholarship school and then go for the highly selective grad school.

danielpreston
10-15-2007, 12:27 PM
Hey guys,

Anyone got more opinions on the colleges and unis listed above apart from the amazing chilli cheese at Wofford!

movdqa
10-15-2007, 12:31 PM
I would suggest a forum more targetted to what you want to study to find graduates of those schools that can provide an opinion of the programs from a consumers point of view.

cujays
10-15-2007, 12:44 PM
what universities

danielpreston
10-15-2007, 12:47 PM
See post #28

JMS
10-15-2007, 01:06 PM
wofford would be an interesting place to look at. I am going to visit Furman Univeristy next weekend and am also going to look at Wofford, as it is nearby. Supposedly great school, campus, town, and you could probably make a strong impact on the team

tennis-n-sc
10-15-2007, 01:35 PM
wofford would be an unteresting place to look at. I am going to visit Furman Univeristy next weekend and am also going to look at Wqofford, as it is nearby. Supposedly great school, campus, town, and you could probably make a strong impact on the team

Guys, you are going to be surprised at the level of tennis in the Southern Conference. You better bring your 5.0+ game or look eslewhere.

JMS
10-15-2007, 02:47 PM
Guys, you are going to be surprised at the level of tennis in the Southern Conference. You better bring your 5.0+ game or look eslewhere.

oh believe me i know. I played the number 1 junior in NC in a tournament earlier this summer. He is going to play for Wofford. Let's just say it was not pretty when i played him :)

Nastase
10-16-2007, 06:53 AM
my earlier post seems lost.

I encourage you to consider a school that gives you an oppty for the best overall college experience...the academics and athletics at many schools on your list (and beyond) are in the same category in regard to academic + athletic prestige. Of course you have to pick a school that has your area of study, but so many other factors need to be considered. Its sounds as if tennis will be a large part of your experience. You are going to get on a bus and drive 5 hours to play dual matches...you had better like your coach, teammates, and overall college situation...make visits, hit with a local alumnus or former player and get their experience, have dinner with the coach, if visits are difficult get online or get reference letters on the coach from former players....The Gulf South + Southern Conference, and others have good schools and decent tennis teams...There are plenty of places to look at but in that category Wofford, Davidson, Furman are excellent....Rollins too. But Rollins (hot Florida) versus Western Carolina (cool mountains) are as different as you can get...take your time, investigate, know your coach and his reputation, dont get hung up on one factor as you make your decision because its the whole experience man. I have found that the degrees from each of these places (unless you go Ivy or other) is nearly equal in value and prestige...good luck mate.

Kaptain Karl
10-16-2007, 09:39 AM
wofford would be an unteresting place to look at. I am going to visit Furman Univeristy next weekend and am also going to look at Wqofford, as it is nearby. Supposedly great school, campus, town, and you could probably make a strong impact on the teamThis post is nearly alarming. Don't you need to be able to communicate effectively to go to one of these colleges???

Geez! "Kids these days...!"

- KK

movdqa
10-16-2007, 11:28 AM
This post is nearly alarming. Don't you need to be able to communicate effectively to go to one of these colleges???

Geez! "Kids these days...!"

- KK

I always give someone the benefit of the doubt on typos.

I do send emails and post from my iPod Touch and will sometimes hit the wrong key or two keys in a row.

JMS
10-16-2007, 02:10 PM
This post is nearly alarming. Don't you need to be able to communicate effectively to go to one of these colleges???

Geez! "Kids these days...!"

- KK

Way too much time on your hands bro. I was in a rush as I had to pick my little sister up from school. Excuse me for not living up to your standards, Gramps.

cghipp
10-16-2007, 04:30 PM
Yeah - spelling is for old people!