PDA

View Full Version : Is 16 gauge more powerful than 17 gauge?


basil J
10-12-2007, 07:22 AM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

Stchamps
10-12-2007, 07:52 AM
I think thinner is more power, so no.

Jonny S&V
10-12-2007, 08:01 AM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

The 17g is thinner which means it will stretch more, so there will be more sling shot effect, so the 16 SHOULD be less powerful. Doesn't mean it will be, though.

tbini87
10-12-2007, 09:26 AM
generally thinner is more powerful, and softer too. can't speak for the strings that you used, but seems odd that they would be noticeably more powerful even strung at a higher tension... maybe you ate your wheaties and were really ripping the ball or something...

Noisy Ninja
10-12-2007, 09:51 AM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

Were both racquets strung up on the same day prior to use? There's usually a drop-off in tension within the first 24 hours immediately after stringing and additional tension loss occurring once you actually hit with the racquet. I'm thinking tension loss may be factor.

rasajadad
10-12-2007, 12:33 PM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

Basil- Thinner is more powerful. I generally string 6-7% tighter when going from 16 - 17g. (Or vice versa.)

gjoc
10-12-2007, 02:57 PM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

Basically, in going to 16g you went the wrong way for what you wanted to achieve...

To get what you want, a firmer/stiffer stringbed, either change to 18g at the same tension, or increase the tension of the 17g.

Typically, the thinner gauge will have more power than the thicker one, for the same stringbed stiffness, but to get the same stringbed stiffness the thicker one needs to be strung at a higher tension. Lowering the tension of the thicker guage (from where it wants to be, back down to the tension of the thinner string) then increases the power level back up by reducing the stringbed stiffness, thereby offsetting the decrease in power from the greater thickness.

wksoh
02-08-2008, 11:27 PM
I have a set of 200GMW and I have one strung with Klip detonator at 59#/57 in a 17 gauge. Plays very nicely, but wanted to firm up the string bed a bit so I figured I'd try the same set up in a 16 gauge.
I strung with the same strings in a 16 gauge on the other 200GMW at 60#/58#.
The 16 gauge was much more powerful than the 17 gauge, even at a higher tension. So my question is: given the same string and racquet, is a 16 gauge more powerful than the same string set up in a 17 gauge?

For me, it depends on the climatic temperature.
When i was in the US in Dec, I had to go 17g otherwise the string bed felt so stiff. When I'm in warmer countries with 90F, 16g felt more powerful went the strings begin to stretch. Not everyone have the same experience though..

steve s
02-08-2008, 11:33 PM
Think each string is different.

stormholloway
02-08-2008, 11:46 PM
I think it's a myth that thinner is more powerful. Thicker means the ball is hitting a denser surface, thinner means it's hitting a less dense surface. People say a more open string pattern results in more power. I disagree. I've always found more inherent power in a Prestige than a Pro Staff. That's just me.

I don't think it's so black and white. Basically, if you need to think about string gauges to get power, you're either weak or over-thinking it. Pick which one feels better. Do you want a more consistent response or more spin? Thicker strings will give you a more solid, more consistent response. Thinner strings will give you more bite and more spin.

That's how I see it.

moxio
02-09-2008, 12:21 AM
Wait, is the difference between thickness, density or volume? I thought it was volume...

wksoh
02-09-2008, 07:26 AM
Should be Gauge not volume; gauge = thickness measured using a micrometer screwgauge

Anyway Volume is a function of the thickness.
(Vol = Pi * Radius * Length)

wksoh
02-09-2008, 07:45 AM
Should be Gauge not volume; gauge = thickness measured using a micrometer screwgauge

Anyway Volume is a function of the thickness.
(Vol = Pi * Radius * Length)

Sorry I stand corrected. I never knew what 16 or 17 meant!
I only know 16g=1.30mm when I think of gauge.. oops
But why 16?