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AmericanTemplar
10-15-2007, 03:42 PM
After having done a search and read several posts on the Stringmeter and other string tension meters it appears the the stringmeter is supposed to be the most accurate, but it also sounds like it doesn't work on polys. Are my deductions correct? Are there any tools that can be used to track tension loss with polys?

shintan17
10-15-2007, 03:45 PM
After having done a search and read several posts on the Stringmeter and other string tension meters it appears the the stringmeter is supposed to be the most accurate, but it also sounds like it doesn't work on polys. Are my deductions correct? Are there any tools that can be used to track tension loss with polys?

From my experiences, it works fine with SPPP 17, but didn't work with Babolat PH Tour, so it really depends on the string, I guess.

LPShanet
10-15-2007, 10:56 PM
After having done a search and read several posts on the Stringmeter and other string tension meters it appears the the stringmeter is supposed to be the most accurate, but it also sounds like it doesn't work on polys. Are my deductions correct? Are there any tools that can be used to track tension loss with polys?

Depends what you mean by "work". It measures stringbed stiffness, not actual tension in pounds, and is meant as a relative tool. That means the numbers are irrelevant...it's used to compare string jobs, preferably ones done on the same machine (or with only one variable different). If you're looking for an actual tension reading in pounds, it won't happen accurately with any tool of this type. However, if you're using it correctly, it should work for any stringbed with any string.

Roforot
10-16-2007, 05:39 AM
I heard somewhere that when the stringbed stiffness decreases by 20% it's time to restring. Have you found this to be true?

BurghKing
10-16-2007, 05:55 AM
When it is time to restring is a matter of preference. Some people will notice a huge playability difference when the tension drops 20%, others will not notice a think. Keep in mind, the tension typically drops about 10% within the first 24 hours of being strung. So, is 20% that noticable to most people?

keithchircop
10-16-2007, 06:40 AM
I use my stringmeter for two reasons.

To check the work of stringers: if you learn that after a good 58lbs stringjob the meter will read 34-35, you can use that number as a benchmark for future stringjobs.

Also, I never break strings and don't notice tension drop much. When the reading drops by 20% I restring. The recommended tensions were set by experienced playtesters. If they all agreed that my racquet isn't much playable below 48lbs, why should I play with it at 38lbs? I could care less about Volandri. Stringing a week or two earlier isn't going to break the bank.

LPShanet
10-16-2007, 09:32 AM
I use my stringmeter for two reasons.

To check the work of stringers: if you learn that after a good 58lbs stringjob the meter will read 34-35, you can use that number as a benchmark for future stringjobs.

Also, I never break strings and don't notice tension drop much. When the reading drops by 20% I restring. The recommended tensions were set by experienced playtesters. If they all agreed that my racquet isn't much playable below 48lbs, why should I play with it at 38lbs? I could care less about Volandri. Stringing a week or two earlier isn't going to break the bank.

Those are legitimate reasons for its use, and a good demonstration of the "relative" application. One note: you also have to account for the differences between constant pull and lockout machines when referring to the stringmeter readings for a "good" 58 lb string job. And you have to use the same stringmeter, since they all vary slightly in calibration.

LPShanet
10-16-2007, 09:38 AM
I heard somewhere that when the stringbed stiffness decreases by 20% it's time to restring. Have you found this to be true?

There are no absolutes. That's a reasonable guideline if you feel it works for you. Some people prefer a "break-in period", which means they actually WANT a little tension reduction. Just take a stringmeter reading right after the racquet comes off the machine (or exactly 24 hours after, but with no playing), and then another when you feel it isn't performing well anymore, and calculate the difference. That's the amount of reduction of stringbed stiffness that you can use as an indicator of restring time.