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nousername
10-17-2007, 09:58 AM
hey,

i searched for some info on around the world (atw) stringing are thought it was quite interesting, but i was wondering there *really* is an issue for throat to top stringing? mainly, b/c due to ignorance i just strung 3 HEAD racquets over the weekend and did them all throat to top and everything is fine. no problems whatsoever. but i just read that the general consensus for HEAD racquets this is a big no-no.

anyone else done head frames throat to top?

i found a document from head's website (i would link it but i cannot reach it right now) indicating how to string. SOME of the racquets had is explicitly state "2-piece recommended", and OTHERs said nothing. for those that said nothing, 2-piece was implied though via their stringing instructions, they said something like "string mains and tie-off, then string crosses and tie-off".

now, for my main question (should i in the future want to avoid throat to top stringing)....

is it OK to just do an "ad-hoc" ATW pattern basic on basic knowledge/intuition about stringing???

for instance, i don't have my sticks with me, but i know them well enough to imagine and atw pattern that would work...

1) string the mains, leave the outer ones off.
2) take one main top-down for the crosses (skipping the first one if you want). leave the last cross un-strung.
3) take the other main, down the side, across the last throat main, and up the other side... going across the last cross at the top if it was skipped.

(and of course, making sure things get clamped correctly b/c of the atypical pattern)

is that all it is, or is the some "official" or "optimal" guide for atw?

nousername
10-17-2007, 10:25 AM
now, for my main question (should i in the future want to avoid throat to top stringing)....

is it OK to just do an "ad-hoc" ATW pattern basic on basic knowledge/intuition about stringing???

btw... on second thought, maybe this is what all atw patterns are ... but your comments are still appreciated.

Landshark
10-17-2007, 12:47 PM
I usually start the mains. On one side, Ill tie the main leaving one main unstrung. String the other main like normal, then cross over near the throat, go up the leftover main to the top, then start crossing from top to bottom like normal. Just be sure when you start the top cross, that it and the bottom crosses are in the correct over or under orientation with respect to the mains.

Landshark
10-17-2007, 12:50 PM
Sorry I can't edit my posts. I should have said, "String the mains on the other side like normal," to be more clear.

Greg Raven
10-18-2007, 05:50 AM
Technically, to string any Head racquet with an ATW or box pattern when it is supposed to be strung two-piece, voids the warranty.

nousername
10-18-2007, 06:22 AM
Technically, to string any Head racquet with an ATW or box pattern when it is supposed to be strung two-piece, voids the warranty.
can you point me to a link or document where this is stated? i'm not trying to be smart, i'm really am curious. everyone says this, but i've never seen it.

the following link will open up a pdf directly from head's website:

http://www.head.com/__/?1568.3b55147b.DL

this is all i could ever find on the matter. in this document for SOME of their racquets they state "We recommend two piece stringing"... i can hardly see that as a necessary requirement for maintaining the warranty.

secondly, my racquets are 10 yrs old, or i bought them 2nd hand. so technically, warranty issues are moot for me... but i'm am curious, and it may be helpful to others.

Steve Huff
10-18-2007, 07:41 AM
Usually, when Head doesn't specify 2-piece stringing, it means that the mains end at the top, thus you have top to bottom stringing anyway.

nousername
10-18-2007, 07:48 AM
Usually, when Head doesn't specify 2-piece stringing, it means that the mains end at the top, thus you have top to bottom stringing anyway.
nope. look at the doc i referenced. plenty of throat ending mains without "2 piece recommended."

aeroman
10-18-2007, 12:46 PM
My aeropro drive I strung throat to top and I never had any trouble. But it might be good just to learn this for future reference.
Aeroman

Paul Goldstein
10-18-2007, 01:12 PM
I usually start the mains. On one side, Ill tie the main leaving one main unstrung. String the other main like normal, then cross over near the throat, go up the leftover main to the top, then start crossing from top to bottom like normal. Just be sure when you start the top cross, that it and the bottom crosses are in the correct over or under orientation with respect to the mains.


i personally take the extra min or 2 to not go more then 2 mains ahead of the other side. why would you really want to have one side of a main unstrung, when you can easily do 2 mains on 1 side, then 2 mains on the other side to keep the tension on the frame even. makes sense right?

Landshark
10-18-2007, 02:18 PM
I only wrote it like that to easily get my message across. I actually alternate one string at a time from side to side to create the least imbalance so I agree with you.

aeroman
10-18-2007, 04:38 PM
I also string one string on a side then another string. Especially if I'm stringing for my customers. It would suck if I broke one of their racquets and had to pay for it.
Aeroman

nousername
10-18-2007, 05:26 PM
I only wrote it like that to easily get my message across. I actually alternate one string at a time from side to side to create the least imbalance so I agree with you.
it was a little confusing, but i understood your pattern.

thought of another way that might be good, which would only require 2 difficult weaves and no direct main tie-offs:

1) on the short side of the string, leave enough to do one extra cross: the one just above the throat.
2) do all the main except the last one on each side.
3) lace the last short side main but do not tension it.
4) take the long side main, and do the crosses skipping the first on the top. you will be weaving the crosses across one limp string: the one mentioned in step #3.
5) after the 2nd to last cross (near the throat) has been weaved, weave in the last cross with the string from the short-side main string but leave enough slack to tension the last short-side main.
6) right now there will be 3 strings needing tension: the last and the 2nd-to-last cross near the throat, and the last main short-side string. tension all.
7) all that's left is a side main and the topmost cross. take the string from the 2nd to last throat cross and weave it up the last main. tension. weave it across the top. tension. done.

i guess you could call this a double-half atw, since you do 2 separate strings that each only go half-way around the world.

i found diredesire's website about atw, and that got me thinking about all this atw stringing. so i'm sure he or someone else has done this has done or mentioned this before (so sorry if this is a repeat or boring you). but i think this way seems pretty good, b/c you only have to do 2 "hard" weaves (both in step 7 above), and you don't directly tie off any mains, which is better for having and even stringbed... according to diredesire, which i guess does make sense.

Landshark
10-18-2007, 11:04 PM
I assume since there are three strings that need to be tensioned, you use an extra clamp. Can I use your pattern if I just use the two clamps on the machine?

Calvin

nousername
10-19-2007, 05:46 AM
I assume since there are three strings that need to be tensioned, you use an extra clamp. Can I use your pattern if I just use the two clamps on the machine?

Calvin
to be honest, i haven't done any of the patterns yet. since i just found out about atw, and i'm just preparing for my next job. i'm throwing these ideas around, so i'm not running around in the dark once i try it... so i haven't really worked out the details, BUT i think you do need a 3rd clamp. i think the 2nd to last main on the short side needs to be clamped from the outside with a starting clamp (occurs right before step 3). otherwise the clamp would be in the way for the crosses. the part when you tension the 3 loose string you shouldn't actually need 3 clamps, b/c each string can all be done sequentially. EXCEPT now you will need to get the starting clamp off, which can be done easily by just moving the free clamp behind it (there should be a free at this point).

i'll try this on my next 1 piece job. (it might be a while, i just string for myself.)

Old_Crow
10-19-2007, 06:34 AM
I string 2-piece whenever possible but here's an ATW from USRSA that works well. Requires a starting clamp though:

Around and Around the World

Add 9 inches to the short side length.
String the mains, leaving the last main on the long side unstrung so that the long side string is at the head. With this long side, string the second-to-top cross, and hold the tension with a starting clamp.
After stringing last main on the short side, string the bottom cross. If the frame has an even number of crosses, weave this bottom cross the same as the second-to-top cross. If there are an odd number of crosses, weave the second cross at the bottom, then the bottom cross, with the bottom cross weave opposite to the second-to-top cross. Tension and tie off the bottom cross.
Now weave the crosses from the second cross at the top down to meet the cross(es) already installed at the throat. Weave the last main back to the top, then the top cross, and tie off.
The advantage of this method is that the tie-off strings are the top and bottom crosses, so any lost tension will have minimal effect on the string bed. Normally, when I tie off on the last mains, some clients complain of the (relatively) low tension of these strings, and it's not always easy to convince them of the validity of reduced tension on tie-off strings.

BTW, if you string a lot of racquets, it's a good idea to join USRSA, it's a little expensive but the books and reference tools are worth the $$ IMO.

YULitle
10-19-2007, 05:28 PM
Technically, to string any Head racquet with an ATW or box pattern when it is supposed to be strung two-piece, voids the warranty.

Source? I've asked the Head Rep in ATL and he says he's never ehard of such a thing.