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Bundey
10-18-2007, 07:23 PM
Okay, so the other day I was playing doubles with my friends. I served a hard ball to the ad court, and it was right on the line. Just after the reciever hit the ball, his partner, who was at the net called it out. Of course I stopped play and looked at him. As the recievers ball was floating in the air to the baseline, which it landed on, the person who called it out in the first place said never mind that it was in, and to keep playing. Of course I didn't have time to react to hit the ball back after that hinderance. After that I argued that it should be my teams point, because it is basically cheating. I mean I hit a good serve, the return is a floater and I could have easily put it away. Instead of giving us the point they insisted we should play a let. We did and I ended up double faulting, because I was so angry. I ended up getting broken that game at 30-40.

I know if this happens in the pro tour, when a line judge calls it out and the chair umpire over rules it, they play a let, no matter if the shot that was called out would have been smacked for a winner. But what if your opponent does this? Doesn't it make since it should be your point?

BlahDow
10-18-2007, 07:39 PM
ugh i hate people that do stupid things like..i would have replayed the point...since your serve was originally called out...you can't just say "nevermind" after they return it

Bundey
10-18-2007, 07:43 PM
ugh i hate people that do stupid things like..i would have replayed the point...since your serve was originally called out...you can't just say "nevermind" after they return it

What? Can you please re-type that? I have no clue what you are saying.

BlahDow
10-18-2007, 07:49 PM
bah...i would have replayed the point since the person was unsure about whether your serve went in or out.

Bundey
10-18-2007, 07:53 PM
bah...i would have replayed the point since the person was unsure about whether your serve went in or out.

No, they knew the serve was in, or atleast realized it after the he called it.

Basically my question is, when you hit a shot that is in, but your opponent calls it out, then after that they realize it was in, what should happen.

jasoncho92
10-18-2007, 09:23 PM
Its considered a let

Kaptain Karl
10-18-2007, 09:49 PM
You are to give them the "benefit of the doubt" that it was an honest mistake and play a Let.

- KK

Rickson
10-18-2007, 10:29 PM
Okay, so the other day I was playing doubles with my friends. I served a hard ball to the ad court, and it was right on the line. Just after the reciever hit the ball, his partner, who was at the net called it out. Of course I stopped play and looked at him. As the recievers ball was floating in the air to the baseline, which it landed on, the person who called it out in the first place said never mind that it was in, and to keep playing. Of course I didn't have time to react to hit the ball back after that hinderance. After that I argued that it should be my teams point, because it is basically cheating. I mean I hit a good serve, the return is a floater and I could have easily put it away. Instead of giving us the point they insisted we should play a let. We did and I ended up double faulting, because I was so angry. I ended up getting broken that game at 30-40.

I know if this happens in the pro tour, when a line judge calls it out and the chair umpire over rules it, they play a let, no matter if the shot that was called out would have been smacked for a winner. But what if your opponent does this? Doesn't it make since it should be your point?

Street rules: false call so you win the point.

Non street rules: play a let

Geezer Guy
10-19-2007, 08:22 AM
Tournament rules: call their return out. end of dispute.


(just joking)

fuzz nation
10-19-2007, 08:41 AM
You've pretty much got to play a let because the returner made a good shot, but the partner wished it a fault a little too much and his call pulled the plug on your 2nd shot. There's a specific address to the problem of waiting to see how the return landed before calling the serve (2nd chance rule?), but I don't remember if it's in the rules or the code. It sounds like the correction in your match happened before the return landed, though.

That corrected fault should never happen more than once or maybe twice in a match or else the violators should concede the points. Otherwise, you're getting robbed on good serves.

deluxe
10-19-2007, 09:39 AM
19. Once an out (meaning a ball has landed outside the court), fault, or let call is made play stops, regardless of what happens thereafter. This policy is sound, though sometimes maddening. For example, with you at the net your partner serves a bullet that the receiver barely gets to the net for an easy setup which you whack away, but the receiver has yelled "fault" as he was returning the service. Inspection reveals that the service was good. You first feel that your putaway shot should count for the point. But suppose that you had missed the putaway. Your immediate cry would have been for a let because the out call distracted you and made you miss. A rule can't work one way one time and work another way another time. It is unfortunate that a miscall was made on such a good service, but you must trust your opponents' intentions to be fair, remember that since they are human they are going to make some mistakes, and realize that since they returned the service a let may be called. The validity of the principle here notwithstanding, most good players who have made a weak giveaway type of return because of an opponent's good forcing shot will give the opponent the point in spite of the out call. The important thing is that a player should not let his ineptitude as a linecaller cause his opponent to fail to win a point that he almost surely would have won had the correct call been made on his forcing shot.

D-man
10-19-2007, 10:15 AM
Out Calls Corrected
If a player mistakenly calls a ball “out” and then realizes it was good, the point shall be replayed if he returned the ball within the proper court. Nonetheless, if the player's return of the ball results in a “weak sitter,” the player should give his opponent the point. If the player failed to make the return, the opponent wins the point. If the mistake was made on the second serve, the server is entitled to two serves.


LINK : http://www.ushsta.org/PLAYERS/PUBLICAREA/HSTMAG/2002/202rules.htm

Key Rules for Unofficiated Matches

wihamilton
10-19-2007, 10:57 AM
Tournament rules: call their return out. end of dispute.


(just joking)

haha nice.

Cindysphinx
10-19-2007, 02:05 PM
19. Once an out (meaning a ball has landed outside the court), fault, or let call is made play stops, regardless of what happens thereafter. This policy is sound, though sometimes maddening. For example, with you at the net your partner serves a bullet that the receiver barely gets to the net for an easy setup which you whack away, but the receiver has yelled "fault" as he was returning the service. Inspection reveals that the service was good. You first feel that your putaway shot should count for the point. But suppose that you had missed the putaway. Your immediate cry would have been for a let because the out call distracted you and made you miss. A rule can't work one way one time and work another way another time. It is unfortunate that a miscall was made on such a good service, but you must trust your opponents' intentions to be fair, remember that since they are human they are going to make some mistakes, and realize that since they returned the service a let may be called. The validity of the principle here notwithstanding, most good players who have made a weak giveaway type of return because of an opponent's good forcing shot will give the opponent the point in spite of the out call. The important thing is that a player should not let his ineptitude as a linecaller cause his opponent to fail to win a point that he almost surely would have won had the correct call been made on his forcing shot.

What is the source for this? I've never seen this in the actual Code.

The Code provision is below, and the question is whether your opponents shot was a "weak sitter" and who gets to decide whether it was a weak sitter or not. You say the receiver's ball floated to the baseline. I wouldn't call that a weak sitter. I would call it a deep return.

By the way, is there anything that tells us who gets to decide whether the return was a weak sitter?

drakulie
10-19-2007, 03:38 PM
You are to give them the "benefit of the doubt" that it was an honest mistake and play a Let.

- KK

The voice of reason.


To the OP, relax! Don't get so angry. :)

psp2
10-19-2007, 05:54 PM
Okay, so the other day I was playing doubles with my friends. I served a hard ball to the ad court, and it was right on the line. Just after the reciever hit the ball, his partner, who was at the net called it out. Of course I stopped play and looked at him. As the recievers ball was floating in the air to the baseline, which it landed on, the person who called it out in the first place said never mind that it was in, and to keep playing. Of course I didn't have time to react to hit the ball back after that hinderance. After that I argued that it should be my teams point, because it is basically cheating. I mean I hit a good serve, the return is a floater and I could have easily put it away. Instead of giving us the point they insisted we should play a let. We did and I ended up double faulting, because I was so angry. I ended up getting broken that game at 30-40.

I know if this happens in the pro tour, when a line judge calls it out and the chair umpire over rules it, they play a let, no matter if the shot that was called out would have been smacked for a winner. But what if your opponent does this? Doesn't it make since it should be your point?

Based on your description above, a let should have been played.

Was your partner playing up at the net? Did he/she have an easy chance at hitting the floating return for a volley winner if not distracted by the "out" call?

Your opponent realized he/she made a wrong OUT call on the serve and corrected it.

When this happens, one of these actions should take place.

1. If the returner hits the ball out or into the net (or you ace him/her), then your opponents should really concede the point.

2. If the returner hits a "weak sitter", then your opponents should concede the point.

3. If the retuner's ball is good and was anything else but a "weak sitter", then a let should be played.

IME, a "weak sitter" is any floating ball where a net person or the server has a very high probability of hitting said ball for a clean winner.

In your description, you wouldn't have a high probability to hit a clean winner from the back of the baseline.


12. Out calls corrected. If a player mistakenly calls a ball “out” and then
realizes it was good, the point shall be replayed if the player returned the ball
within the proper court. Nonetheless, if the player’s return of the ball results
in a “weak sitter,” the player should give the opponent the point. If the player
failed to make the return, the opponent wins the point. If the mistake was
made on the second serve, the server is entitled to two serves.

In a match last weekend (on clay) my partner served a great 1st serve wide on a deuce point that hit the side line. The receiver (in stretched form) called the serve "out" and hit his return out. I was at the net and had a very good look at the ball, which clipped the line. After the return, I questioned his call and pointed to the mark. The returner realized his error and simply conceded the point.

If his return was anything but a "weak sitter", we would have played a let (1st serve).