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View Full Version : What makes a racket arm friendly?


TRiBaL
10-20-2007, 12:30 PM
Low stiffness,and low swing weight?

haerdalis
10-20-2007, 12:38 PM
For a racquet to be armfriendly it needs to do 2 things. It needs to dampen the shock of the incoming ball and it needs to not be too heavy to swing. Weight helps with dampening shock so depending on how hard hit balls you face you need a certain mass to reduce shock. Shock can also be reduce by having a flexy frame or a big stringbed etc.

matchmaker
10-20-2007, 12:55 PM
Standard length. Heavy: at least 12 oz. Headlight and relatively flexy.

Believe me this is the recipe you need. I have been a long time elbow sufferer and now play with a Wilson Reflex. 8 to 10 pts. headlight. over 13 oz. with overgrip and vibration dampener. Standard length and about 57 flex rate.

I do not have any elbow issues now and can actually play on consecutive days. I had a week of holiday and went out to play each day without pain.

Off course it depends also on what type of player you are. SV, baseline or all court. Check out this website: www.racquetresearch.com and you can read all about it. The Prince Original Graphite oversize is the most armfriendly racquet. But if you are an SV player may not be that indicated. Pro Kennex has a few good arm friendly frames and so does Volkl. Most Babolats and stiff Wilson frames won't do a lot of good to a sore elbow.

One thing: avoid light racquets. I know it is counterintuitive but light racquets are bad for the elbow. Stay also away from headheavy racquets.

HyperHorse
10-20-2007, 01:05 PM
Lead Tape.
Weight IS a wonderful thing.

tbini87
10-20-2007, 01:11 PM
strings can play a major role in making a racquet arm friendly too...

bluegrasser
10-20-2007, 01:14 PM
Standard length. Heavy: at least 12 oz. Headlight and relatively flexy.

Believe me this is the recipe you need. I have been a long time elbow sufferer and now play with a Wilson Reflex. 8 to 10 pts. headlight. over 13 oz. with overgrip and vibration dampener. Standard length and about 57 flex rate.

I do not have any elbow issues now and can actually play on consecutive days. I had a week of holiday and went out to play each day without pain.

Off course it depends also on what type of player you are. SV, baseline or all court. Check out this website: www.racquetresearch.com and you can read all about it. The Prince Original Graphite oversize is the most armfriendly racquet. But if you are an SV player may not be that indicated. Pro Kennex has a few good arm friendly frames and so does Volkl. Most Babolats and stiff Wilson frames won't do a lot of good to a sore elbow.

One thing: avoid light racquets. I know it is counterintuitive but light racquets are bad for the elbow. Stay also away from headheavy racquets.
'
All true + stay away( if you have elbow issues) from poly strings - I was using a PD for several months w/ a hybrid and my elbow swelled up big time, so now I'm back to my Prestige.

HyperHorse
10-20-2007, 01:28 PM
Oh and multifilament/gut strings are the best if you want a comfortable racquet!!!!
Avoid the heresy that are polys!!!

Mister G
10-20-2007, 02:05 PM
Stiffness, weight, length, balance (head light etc), strings, shoes, socks, cap (nike or lacoste) etc...

One of the BIGGEST factors that most people dont tend to (or like to) consider is:


TECHNIQUE

Teh_pwnerer
10-20-2007, 02:12 PM
Stiffness, weight, length, balance (head light etc), strings, shoes, socks, cap (nike or lacoste) etc...

One of the BIGGEST factors that most people dont tend to (or like to) consider is:


TECHNIQUE


Ok technique is a huge factor, but the racquet also has its role in how well someone plays, for example today i picked up a crappy babolat a NS drive or sumtin, i could only hit with topspin and it felt HORRIBLE, AWEFUL, picke dmy K95 again, and balls where deep, spinny and the really good feel i loved since the first hit.

BOT: I think the Recipe described above, Standar lenght, Weight at least 12 oz and stuff is right, or at least i completely agree. See. i used to play with a ProStaff Blitz, 10 oz, head heavy. Elbow almost blew up when used poly for the first time. The k95 for example, yes people say its heavy and that your arm will fall (well they tell me that here) but they havent played with it 6 months, not even swung it, they just pick it up, nah heavy, go back to their current racquet.

As i said i have been playng 6 months with this racquet and no injuries whatsoever. Well some pain wrist but because i started doing the reverse forehand on low balls.

So i repeat. the above recipe is right.

Teh_pwnerer
10-20-2007, 02:13 PM
'
All true + stay away( if you have elbow issues) from poly strings - I was using a PD for several months w/ a hybrid and my elbow swelled up big time, so now I'm back to my Prestige.

Would you mind telling us the tension of the polys?.
Because i dont have any complaints about it, mine is strung at 58lbs btw.

LafayetteHitter
10-20-2007, 03:08 PM
Flexible frames are always easier on the arm. Although a soft multi in a stiffer frame never causes any problems for my tender wrist either. A frame with a nice sized sweet spot helps because the mishits cause some arm discomfort as well. Most of the frames you have discussed in other threads would be considered arm friendly for most though.

TRiBaL
10-20-2007, 03:11 PM
Yea the racket I am currently using is a wilson ksixone 95, and the stiffness is like 69. So maybe thats the reason makes my arm sore, that and maybe swing weight being at 340?

LafayetteHitter
10-20-2007, 03:32 PM
What string are you using in it and at what tension? The swingweight won't be as much a factor as the stiffness. Something like X-1 Biphase or even Yonex 850 Pro Multi would be a sweet setup for your frame and would provide some additional comfort. You should be able to setup that racquet without having any arm issues. It has nice plow through because of the static weight combined with the heavier swingweight.

daddy.dirtsurfer
10-20-2007, 04:11 PM
Redondo is flexible but I put on some lead tape at 3 and 9 to make an even balance one and it's still flexible to me and I had never any problem with TE.

Teh_pwnerer
10-20-2007, 04:19 PM
Yea the racket I am currently using is a wilson ksixone 95, and the stiffness is like 69. So maybe thats the reason makes my arm sore, that and maybe swing weight being at 340?

What strings are you using and at what tension? that might be the problem...

Mister G
10-20-2007, 04:20 PM
Ok technique is a huge factor, but the racquet also has its role in how well someone plays, for example today i picked up a crappy babolat a NS drive or sumtin, i could only hit with topspin and it felt HORRIBLE, AWEFUL, picke dmy K95 again, and balls where deep, spinny and the really good feel i loved since the first hit.

BOT: I think the Recipe described above, Standar lenght, Weight at least 12 oz and stuff is right, or at least i completely agree. See. i used to play with a ProStaff Blitz, 10 oz, head heavy. Elbow almost blew up when used poly for the first time. The k95 for example, yes people say its heavy and that your arm will fall (well they tell me that here) but they havent played with it 6 months, not even swung it, they just pick it up, nah heavy, go back to their current racquet.

As i said i have been playng 6 months with this racquet and no injuries whatsoever. Well some pain wrist but because i started doing the reverse forehand on low balls.

So i repeat. the above recipe is right.

Yes of course :) Im just saying that technique is a huge factor that people seem to overlook (i.e. "Oh I got a new racquet, my elbow hurts, the racquet sucks!" attitude) I didnt want to go into the details of stiffness, strings etc because Im sure someone else can do a better job of explaining than I can...

haerdalis
10-20-2007, 04:43 PM
3 things matter. Equipment (racquet, balls and strings), technique and how much one plays. Technique is the often the most difficult to change. How often we play is something we dont really want to change, which leaves equipment. I do believe that with the right equipment hardly anyone should suffer from tennis elbow. So think longterm and play with something comfortable.

TRiBaL
10-20-2007, 07:11 PM
3 things matter. Equipment (racquet, balls and strings), technique and how much one plays. Technique is the often the most difficult to change. How often we play is something we dont really want to change, which leaves equipment. I do believe that with the right equipment hardly anyone should suffer from tennis elbow. So think longterm and play with something comfortable.

Thats exactly what im thinking, comfort to me is like the 1st thing that comes to mind when i buy a racket. Its very important people seem to think, OH i can use this racket just fine and i'm really young and small. Doesn't that doesn't make sense, its about how much can you get out of a racket so really beneficial for you. It's not a strength issue and I don't really have tennis elbow. Its just im more label to get it with something doesn't suit me right.

Martingale
10-21-2007, 02:23 PM
Too flex is not necessarily arm friendly since vibrations in flex rackets tend to be larger than in stiffer ones, and such low frequency vibrations are thought to contribute to tennis elbow. I posted a survey of the scientific evidence (there is very little written on this anyhow) here:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=156051

hjminard
10-21-2007, 06:28 PM
Related question: Does the advice in this thread also apply to golfer's elbow?

fuzz nation
10-21-2007, 10:52 PM
It may be relative to technique in general, but I think that a raquet has to fit your individual swing so that you routinely catch the sweetspot. Even if you mishit all day with a flexible racquet, your arm probably won't love you for it.

A lot of our pals here love Babolats, most of which are pretty stiff, but plenty of others trash them - I suspect a bad fit for the latter. Anyone who is more susceptible to arm irritation usually doesn't find out until after they make a choice that lights up their elbow in a bad way, so the wisdom of sticking with what works for you makes plenty of sense. A friend of mine decided to try poly in some frames that he'd been using for years and he got vicious tennis elbow from it. It's fine for some, but it didn't work for him and he stuck with his favorite multifiber after his arm cooled out.

hyogen
10-21-2007, 11:02 PM
flexible racquet!!!!!!!! not even the lowest powered players frames are flexible..
like the Yonex RDS 001 and 002...i didn't look at the flex ratings and assumed they'd be flexible so I demo'ed em... and BAM!!!!!!! tennis elbow.

turns out they're both 65 ra flex rating = bad for me.

I use the FXP prestige Team which has 57 flex rating-- I DON'T get tennis elbow. It's amazing.

Also, my dad was wondering why he didn't get tennis elbow either...after he bought a new racquet. it has a lot of power....a tweener racquet.

It's a Wilson nCode 5....which has 55 flex rating! no wonder!!!!!!!!!

we both have had very bad tennis elbow problem in the past ;D

I am not sure if even 60 is ok for me.. probably. 63 is probably getting to be a little too stiff for my elbow. 65 for sure.

I hope the Prestige Pro (MG which michael chaho recommends as being a superb racquet) is very flexible. I think most prestiges are around 61.

I use stiff Prince Polygut 17 in the mains strung close to 70lbs, and crosses with Sensation 16 at around 62lbs....still no problem ;)

LPShanet
10-22-2007, 01:48 AM
Standard length. Heavy: at least 12 oz. Headlight and relatively flexy.

Believe me this is the recipe you need. I have been a long time elbow sufferer and now play with a Wilson Reflex. 8 to 10 pts. headlight. over 13 oz. with overgrip and vibration dampener. Standard length and about 57 flex rate.

I do not have any elbow issues now and can actually play on consecutive days. I had a week of holiday and went out to play each day without pain.

Off course it depends also on what type of player you are. SV, baseline or all court. Check out this website: www.racquetresearch.com and you can read all about it. The Prince Original Graphite oversize is the most armfriendly racquet. But if you are an SV player may not be that indicated. Pro Kennex has a few good arm friendly frames and so does Volkl. Most Babolats and stiff Wilson frames won't do a lot of good to a sore elbow.

One thing: avoid light racquets. I know it is counterintuitive but light racquets are bad for the elbow. Stay also away from headheavy racquets.

The laws of physics support everything you say. Well done.

LPShanet
10-22-2007, 01:51 AM
Stiffness, weight, length, balance (head light etc), strings, shoes, socks, cap (nike or lacoste) etc...

One of the BIGGEST factors that most people dont tend to (or like to) consider is:


TECHNIQUE

Also correct. Most tennis elbow cases are attributable to technique flaws, which result in stressful contact via lateness, poor grips, timing, etc. However, some racquets exacerbate the consequences of those flaws more than others.

galatti
10-22-2007, 06:14 AM
Are heavier frames better for arms (arm friendly)?! :o

kumat63
10-22-2007, 08:08 AM
Stiffness, weight, length, balance (head light etc), strings, shoes, socks, cap (nike or lacoste) etc...

One of the BIGGEST factors that most people dont tend to (or like to) consider is:


TECHNIQUE

Very important point! Heavy, flexy racquets will always help, but technique is the key and the trick (as a pro taught me many years ago) is quite simple: you need to keep your elbow close to your body through the ball and the head lagging behind your arm/hand. Getting the elbow out and flipping the wrist too early are the culprits... and I see lots of guys doing this!

grass_hopper
10-22-2007, 08:23 AM
big sweet spot and stable frame make the racquet comfortable.

LPShanet
10-23-2007, 12:35 PM
Are heavier frames better for arms (arm friendly)?! :o

Generally speaking, yes. There are many other factors at work, but for max safety, you should use the heaviest racquet that you can comfortably use without changing your swing speed adversely. It's basic physics for reducing shock. You'll be glad later.

Morrissey
10-23-2007, 12:57 PM
For a racquet to be armfriendly it needs to do 2 things. It needs to dampen the shock of the incoming ball and it needs to not be too heavy to swing. Weight helps with dampening shock so depending on how hard hit balls you face you need a certain mass to reduce shock. Shock can also be reduce by having a flexy frame or a big stringbed etc.

Well said and simplified. Also to help the OP out, the racquets I've tested that have had the best feel for the arm were the Fischer, Volkl and Yonex.

hyogen
10-23-2007, 12:58 PM
Well said and simplified. Also to help the OP out, the racquets I've tested that have had the best feel for the arm were the Fischer, Volkl and Yonex.

even the yonex rds 001 and 002 gave me tennis elbow. flex rating of 65 each. look for something lower--around 60-61..or even lower. as low as 55

keithchircop
10-23-2007, 01:38 PM
Static weight: 12oz
Swingweight: 310 - 330
Flex lower than 63

All true + stay away( if you have elbow issues) from poly strings - I was using a PD for several months w/ a hybrid and my elbow swelled up big time, so now I'm back to my Prestige.

Welcome back into the club.