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View Full Version : Anyone string for junior tournaments?


jamauss
10-21-2007, 12:36 AM
The tennis center I string for is hosting a regional junior tournament (USTA Southwest Sweet 16 Junior Tennis Tournament) next weekend and asked if I'd be available for stringing then. The only thing is, I'm the only stringer they have and I have no idea what to expect, in terms of quantity and turn around time expected.

Has anyone here strung for junior tournaments and if so, what was it like? I kinda assume that not many players under the age of 14 or so are going to be breaking any strings.

JohnP
10-21-2007, 12:58 AM
I have. When I strung for my club as a teenager I would do stringing service anytime there was a tournament.

I would recommend looking up the tournament. With a name like "Sweet 16" could it possibly be some kind of invitational tournament with draws of only 16 players, or is it just a 16 and under tournament. If there are relatively small draws, you should be able to handle it. Are they expecting you to be at the tournament, with your stringer (or a clubs stringer) on hand to do racquet stringings on the spot? If so, do you or the club have enough strings available to have a decent selection? Are you prepared to be able to string any kind of racquet (knowing what holes to tie, where to start the crosses on a 2 piece string job, etc)?

Outside of the above concerns, it should not be a big deal and is usually kind of fun.

JohnP
10-21-2007, 01:08 AM
After doing some research, it looks like a top-16 invitational for players in the region. That means small draws, but it appears that there are draws for every age group from 10-18. There are usually consolation draws but you should be able to handle it. Make sure you are realistic and honest about the time you will need to complete a racquet, in the chance that you get behind at all.

One more thing: If you're really worried, it may not be a bad idea to try to secure a selection of loaner racquets, if your club has any kind of pro shop or such, in the rare case that you cannot get a racquet completed in time for a player and they MUST play a match.

jamauss
10-21-2007, 01:10 AM
Yeah, by "Sweet 16" I think it means draws of the top 16 players for each age group. (10-18 )

I *think* they want me to be available at the tournament and be on-hand to do racquet stringings, I'm going to find out for sure this week. The club has some string but, it's exclusively prince or head string, no Lux/Babolat/etc. I'm not sure what brands are popular with junior players.

As far as being prepared to string any kind of racquet - I'd have my USRSA manual with me and hope for the best. :)

jamauss
10-21-2007, 01:14 AM
Good idea about the loaner racquets, I'll have to check with them on that. The fastest I can get most frames done is in about 35 minutes.

JohnP
10-21-2007, 01:51 AM
If you know what you're doing and have a USRSA manual, you should be fine. When in doubt, you can always cheat and see how the racquet was strung previously (assuming they bring you the broken racquet with the strings still in the hoop).

For a regional tournament, the vast majority of players generally go home between tourney days, and string at home. Of those that stay in nearby hotels, many of them bring a stringer along as well.

Just make sure you're there, ready to go, by the completion of the first round of matches (usually around 10:30am or so).

Remember. at the end of the day, it is never mandatory for a club to supply a stringing service, and is only considered standard for national or higher level tournaments where there are alot of players playing from other sections. Do the best job you can, as having a reliable stringing service at a tournament is a great boost to a tournament, but remember that at the end of the day it is the player's responsibility to have their racquets ready to play, not yours. Enjoy.

aeroman
10-21-2007, 10:18 AM
Most kids that want a specific string have a reel of their own for stringing so you don't have to worry about that. Good luck with your stringing.
Aeroman

Hooooon
10-21-2007, 10:37 AM
The tennis center I string for is hosting a regional junior tournament (USTA Southwest Sweet 16 Junior Tennis Tournament) next weekend and asked if I'd be available for stringing then. The only thing is, I'm the only stringer they have and I have no idea what to expect, in terms of quantity and turn around time expected.

Has anyone here strung for junior tournaments and if so, what was it like? I kinda assume that not many players under the age of 14 or so are going to be breaking any strings.

since it's the southwest and you won't get the top couple kids from the section, the level will be 200-500 nationally. i wouldn't worry about even the older kids breaking strings in less than 6 hours if they use poly.

tbini87
10-21-2007, 10:53 AM
good luck, sounds like fun!

goober
10-21-2007, 11:17 AM
Wow you must be busy with all this stringing plus your regular job. How many racquets do they have stringing per day usually? What machine do they have you working with?

jamauss
10-21-2007, 02:44 PM
Wow you must be busy with all this stringing plus your regular job. How many racquets do they have stringing per day usually? What machine do they have you working with?
Well, I'd say on average I get 6 to 8 racquets per week (so far..only been doing it for a few weeks). If I string down there at the tennis center they have a nice Prince 5000. Sometimes I'll bring them home and string them on my own machine (SP Aria).

goober
10-21-2007, 03:27 PM
Well, I'd say on average I get 6 to 8 racquets per week (so far..only been doing it for a few weeks). If I string down there at the tennis center they have a nice Prince 5000. Sometimes I'll bring them home and string them on my own machine (SP Aria).

Oh 6-8 per week is not too bad. I am sure they will pick up business soon. A lot of public tennis centers do 10+/day.

ch4ng
10-21-2007, 03:38 PM
i strung up for nationals for juniors at eldorado park during the summer. i was there for 2 days and during those 2 days i did alot of stringing. there were 2 of us stringing racquets and we strung up racquets all day or till around 5 o clock and i came in around 8 in the morning. there were a couple that wanted polys in their racquets and the rest were syn gut.

IanRichardson
10-21-2007, 05:08 PM
just do as much as you think you can do. It is likely most of the kids will have several racquets that they should have strung fresh before starting the tournament. If this is the case then unless you get some sampras wannabe's with wealthy parents you wont be cutting out sets of gut and stringing up 8 raquets at a time for anyone or anything like that. Unless your club advertised a stringing service for players then you shouldnt feel bad if you get too busy and have to turn people away.

jamauss
10-21-2007, 08:00 PM
Oh 6-8 per week is not too bad. I am sure they will pick up business soon. A lot of public tennis centers do 10+/day.
Yeah, I bet places like Paseo or Scottsdale Ranch Park do a lot more stringing than Surprise. I think the tennis center being new is just starting to get people back into tennis so it's slowly building.

tennisguy2121
10-21-2007, 08:26 PM
i have done a few national junior tournaments. I did about 21 racquets the first day of the last one I did. That was a long day lol. Alot of them want it NOW. You can always tell them there is a rush fee for getting it done immediately. It seemed they either used syn gut or all poly. Unfortunately numerous players used prestiges, which arent fun to string if you are in a hurry IMHO. There are alot of nice parents/coaches/kids/ but every once in a while you will get a rude one.
Make sure you have a selection of each category of string, such as syn guts, multis, polys, a few natural gut just in case.

diredesire
10-22-2007, 12:52 AM
If it's a relatively laid back tourney, i wouldn't worry too much at all. I've strung for a few bigger D1 tourneys (National indoors, Regionals, etc) and I'll see about 40 a weekend. A lot of your time will be spent sitting around watching tennis, and then you'll have a few dumped on you at a time (or even worse, a pile waiting for you at night).

Most of these guys are probably going to have several racquets, but if it's a pretty biiiiig tournament with a high level of player, they might have frames dropped off prior to matches/tournament that you'll have to deal with. Don't sweat it so much, just blast some music and take your time.

My tips: Wear comfortable shoes, and take breaks whenever you can (stretch out!) Standing on your feet for hours a day sucks.

Also: BRING TOOLS! Bring tools you think you'll never need... bring: needle nose pliers, knot tying pliers (parallel, CAM if available), cutters, awl, starting clamp, allen wrench set, wrench, wd40, etc (just in case).

Bare minimum i'd suggest needle nose pliers, cutters, awl and starting clamp (unless you string w/o SC)

jamauss
10-29-2007, 08:37 PM
Well, the tournament went pretty smooth this past weekend. I overheard a lot of players and parents saying how nice they thought the place was so, that's always good. :)

I told the tennis center I would be "on call" for stringing and gave them my cell phone number. I only ended up stringing 3 or 4 racquets each day (Sat/Sun) so not too much work. I need to remember to bring some medical tape with me next time to wrap around my fingertips, though. And also some kind of device to help me measure out string. Their Prince 5000 doesn't have a measuring device on it and using a foot-long ruler sucks.

Everyone seemed to be satisfied with their string jobs. One guy even gave me a $5 tip since I did his daughters racquet in a hurry before her match went on.

A couple people had their own reels with them, and they wanted hybrid jobs, etc.

Most of the boys asked for tension of 60+ lbs, most of the girls were in the 55 lbs. range give or take a pound or two.

All but one racquet I strung was a Babolat or Head racquet. The Pure Drives, Flexpoints and LM's seem popular with the juniors. The one non-Head racquet was a Wilson Hyper ProStaff.

meh
10-29-2007, 08:49 PM
Just measure how much of your wingspan 3 ft is, and you'll be able to deal with string lengths without having to fuss with a ruler. I picked up this tip when I started stringing at a shop, and it's invaluable when stringing in volume.

jamauss
10-29-2007, 08:56 PM
how much 3 ft or 2 ft is? I usually needed to measure out either 10 ft (short side) or 18 ft (to get a half set from a reel for a hybrid job). I guess knowing both 2 ft. and 3 ft. would be valuble. When you know that, what do you do? Hold the string with one hand while pulling it up to a point on your arm with another, basically?