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View Full Version : Ahh! How do you play in 25-60mph wind?


chlsmo
10-21-2007, 06:51 AM
What are the strategies for windy conditions?

I had a tournament yesterday where it was so windy I almost wanted to just pack it in and go home. Needless to say I played, and while the wind was bad I played not so well. My toss was blowing all over the place, and while waiting to return my raquet would blow in my hands. Balls were blowing into our court constantly. Overall pretty frustrating.

Any help? Thanks.

J011yroger
10-21-2007, 06:55 AM
2 words. Tally Ho!

Get your but to the net STAT!

Serve and volley, chip and charge, belt and bonzai (my personal favorite).

Cut the wind on your side of the court completely out of the picture.

J

Mountain Ghost
10-21-2007, 11:03 AM
First off, tournament day is too late to work on it. On every windy day, when everyone else goes home or into the clubhouse, stay out there and practice . . . your positioning, your balance, your timing and not giving into the temptation to anticipate the exact point of impact too soon. Continue moving, resist the desire to ďget setĒ early (except maybe in a headwind) and KEEP YOUR BACKSWINGS SHORT AND TIGHT.

IN A CROSSWIND: The ball wonít be moving in a straight line, so be prepared to not move in a straight line yourself. In other words, focus on your balance so that your momentum can be redirected instantaneously and isnít committed to where you THOUGHT the ball was going to be. IN A TAILWIND: Time your hits later than you think you should and, to keep the ball from sailing, increase your low-to-high stroke-path inclination instead of reducing your head speed. IN A HEADWIND: Remind yourself to keep your backswings short and tight, and (you already know this, but) time your hits earlier than you think you should.

One of the biggest problems with wind is the perception that you need to modify things more than you really need to. As long as you donít commit too early, you can always reposition. As long as you donít overrun the ball, you can always use a full and normal stroke. Basically, as long as you donít freak, you can always adjust.

MG

Slazenger
10-21-2007, 12:55 PM
It's a lot easier said than done MG. I do everything you suggested and it still is a task playing in the wind.

I played yesterday against a huge hitting junior and it was VERY windy.
When I was with the wind, I hit a lot of kick serves up the T on the duece court. I've never hit so many kick serve aces.

It was ugly tennis though. The wind swirled so some times I'd end up hitting my backhand way close to my body, other times I'd have to stretch out to hit it;
mid point the wind would subside such that I'd have compensated for the wind and have to readjust midpoint to realign myself.

It's very tough playing in strong wind. It basically becomes a mental game because you feel you can't execute like you normally can.

KhaosBaseliner
10-21-2007, 01:37 PM
I totally agree with you Slazenger... i think hitting flatter helps to cut through the wind too...

bertrevert
10-21-2007, 11:14 PM
Specifically with the serve, ball toss lower of course, but also I find I stand more straight on, forcing myself more into the court, all the while going for less on the serve, forcing more body into the shot but actually hitting softer for fear of sending it out. So, straight on, think Goran if you will. It's just moer direct in the wind.

Sounds like you got your serve working (with the tailwind!) and so that wasn't all the problem.

On groundies taking some of your usual spin out of your shots (hit flatter) can take out some of the chance of the wind ripping the spinny ball out of its trajectory. Why the spinnier ball is more subject to wind I guess is because it's hit just higher over the net and the wind grabs it.

No lobs.

BravoRed691
10-21-2007, 11:28 PM
Simple solution....bring you're own wind machine and create your own wind to counter that that nature blows at you. Or if you're cardio is superb, you can blow the wind away or blow the ball where you want it to go...well that's what i do anyways...hope this helps!

lol, sorry im tired!
Take the ball on the rise as much as you can to avoid letting the wind play with it. And if you are taking the ball on the rise, you'll prob end up hitting through it more than you usually do anyways...

BR

BravoRed691
10-21-2007, 11:31 PM
Shoot, first off, apparently i can't spell "your!" and you asked about serves didn't you? ... darn it's gonna be a long night!

BR

JohnP
10-21-2007, 11:35 PM
2 words. Tally Ho!

Get your but to the net STAT!

Serve and volley, chip and charge, belt and bonzai (my personal favorite).

Cut the wind on your side of the court completely out of the picture.

J

And when you face a player like this in windy conditions, LOB THE HOLY CRAP OUT OF HIM! :)

tennisfa
10-22-2007, 02:55 AM
i just use a tighter strung racket and just keep in in mind that there is wind, and it's going to have weird flight path.

J011yroger
10-22-2007, 03:25 AM
And when you face a player like this in windy conditions, LOB THE HOLY CRAP OUT OF HIM! :)

Why? Tailwinds will try to blow your lob long, and headwinds will knock it down for an easy overhead. I would go with low passes when the wind was with me, and dippers when the wind was against me. When wind is high the LAST thing you want to do is put the ball up in the air for a prolonged period of time.

J

lakis92
10-22-2007, 04:02 AM
Always!!!!!!!

Andres
10-22-2007, 05:48 AM
60 mph winds???

Punisha
10-22-2007, 05:53 AM
60mph crosswind would be mad... you could aim onto another court, and it would come back...

BillH
10-22-2007, 08:04 AM
60mph crosswind would be mad... you could aim onto another court, and it would come back...

Just a usual day here in beautiful Oklahoma....

Doc Hollidae
10-22-2007, 11:00 AM
Serving and volleying should be you first game plan. When hitting ground strokes, hit a lot of slice. Slicing will cut through the wing much better than topspin will. Hitting flat would be your second option. Either way the key is driving the ball instead of bushing up and looping it.

JohnP
10-22-2007, 05:13 PM
Why? Tailwinds will try to blow your lob long, and headwinds will knock it down for an easy overhead. I would go with low passes when the wind was with me, and dippers when the wind was against me. When wind is high the LAST thing you want to do is put the ball up in the air for a prolonged period of time.

J

Why are you assuming that the wind is either going to be blowing ahead directly with or against you? It is just as likely to be blowing at a perfect 90 degree angle from the direction of play as it is to be blowing directly with the direction of play. No matter what, it is almost always going to be blowing at an angle. You're very correct when the wind has little side to side effect on the ball, but when it does, it wreaks havoc on overheads.

Having somebody miss a few sloppy overheads because their footwork and coordination was being taxed to the limit in tough conditions is a very fast way to make them lose confidence at the net.

J011yroger
10-22-2007, 05:24 PM
Why are you assuming that the wind is either going to be blowing ahead directly with or against you? It is just as likely to be blowing at a perfect 90 degree angle from the direction of play as it is to be blowing directly with the direction of play. No matter what, it is almost always going to be blowing at an angle. You're very correct when the wind has little side to side effect on the ball, but when it does, it wreaks havoc on overheads.

Having somebody miss a few sloppy overheads because their footwork and coordination was being taxed to the limit in tough conditions is a very fast way to make them lose confidence at the net.

Never occured to me to lob in a crosswind, I would be too leery of the ball being blown out of bounds. The more air you have under your ball, the more the wind can affect it. At least with the head or tail wind, you can try to finesse/fight it. In a crosswind, you are pretty screwed.

J