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View Full Version : 4.5 in Two Years


jasoncho92
10-21-2007, 09:49 PM
I made a thread sorta like this around two months ago, but im wondering if its realistic to get to 4.5 in two years of playing if i went to 3.0-3.5 in 6 months. And is it really that much harder to move up a level in skill after 3.5?

dacrymn
10-21-2007, 09:53 PM
yeah, yeah it is. It gets exponentially harder to move up as you get better. Just keep that in mind. I do, however, think it is very possible to reach 4.5 in two years, if you're dedicated enough, you like the sport, and you have some talent. Also kinda depends on your resources too, though.

goober
10-21-2007, 09:54 PM
Each level takes much longer to move up and many people get stuck at a level for a variety of reasons. It is not a linear progression.

Noveson
10-21-2007, 09:56 PM
Definitely possible. I have been playing tennis for almost 3 years, and am a legit 4.5 and still improving. Course nobody has to believe me if they don't want to.

tbini87
10-21-2007, 10:55 PM
i think it is possible also, but it would take a great athlete with tons of ability and dedication. why the rush to make it there in 2 years anyways?

AznHylite
10-21-2007, 10:58 PM
i think it is possible also, but it would take a great athlete with tons of ability and dedication. why the rush to make it there in 2 years anyways?

Maybe he wants to get the most out of his years?

fuzz nation
10-21-2007, 11:10 PM
Think positively, get after it, and prove it can be done... then make a nice chunk of change on your book that spells out how you did it.

OK, maybe we can't land you a book deal, but if you go to work on reaching the 4.5's, the worst that will happen is you'll play a lot, maybe not quite make it, but still get a good deal better. That's a pretty attractive worst case...

shintan17
10-21-2007, 11:34 PM
I do think it's possible, too, BUT like everyone else said...with dedication, talent (atheticism), and excellent understanding of the game. I would say 95% of players cannot make it to 4.5 within two years because they are not athetic enough nor have enough understanding of how the game is SUPPOSED to be played. Most recreational players usually get stuck at 3.5-4.0 level. Believe me, SOLID 4.5 is VERY VERY GOOD.

JohnP
10-22-2007, 12:33 AM
Yes, it is absolutely possible to be a legitimate 4.5 in 2 years. It is also probably more difficult per level. I was competing at a 4.5 level in around that amount of time, give or take. It's hard to remember exactly as I was a junior and you didn't think in NTRP ratings back then.

I think the most important thing to developing that quickly is just being able to understand the game at a high level, quickly. That is, watching players at a high level playing and actually understanding what is going on. Seeing how they move their bodies, their arms, their legs. How they make contact with the ball, how they play points, etc. Then it's just a matter of being able to translate into your own hand eye coordination. I think most people that are relatively athletic/coordinated have the ability to play at a 4.5 level fairly quickly if they mentally understand what they are attempting to do correctly and right away. I hope that makes sense.

That all being said, there are alot of players at the 3.0-3.5 level who get there very quickly on raw athletic ability and never progress much further because they never really comprehend the game at a higher level.

jb193
10-22-2007, 07:17 AM
Here are the different stages that I had to go through, and I am only a bottom feeder 4.0 over a 7 year period (played about 3 hours per week). Good 4.0's beat me and I am reasonably athletic.

Year One: No serve, bad footwork, bad focus (mental game), decent forehand
Yare Two: No serve, bad footwork, bad focus (mental game), better backhand, good forehand
Year three: better serve, OK footwork, bad focus, better backhand, good forehand
Year four: OK serve, OK footwork, Bad focus, Better backhand, mediocre forehand (I experimented too much)
Year five: Decent Serve, Decent footwork, bad focus, OK Backhand, solid forheand
Year six: Good Serve, Decent footwork, Bad mental game, OK backhand, Good forehand
Year seven; Good serve (solid, not great), good footwork (not great), better mental game (could be a lot better), OK footwork (needs to get better), Good backhand (solid, not great), and good forehand (solid, not great).

Of course, I am simplifying here big time. Each of these categories consists of many elements. The "mental game" consists of such things as watching the ball, not getting so nervous during competition, developing strategies, and having the will to hit a 10-20 shot rally without hitting the panic button. The serve consists of the toss (took me several years), the footwork, the racquet pronation, the timing, and the directional control. Anyway, there is a lot to each category and I haven't come close to covering them all. My point is that for someone to reach 4.5 in two years, I would think they would need to play tons of tennis on a daily/weekly basis and need some kind of instruction. If I had a coach tell me to quit screwing around with my grip all the time, or to get lower, or to focus on the ball more, or help my on my serve mechanics, I would have advanced at a much faster pace. No way did I just automatically do that. It took a bunch of butt whoopins to make me think about it and incorporate the right changes. Anything is possible, but a lot of work is required........

tbini87
10-22-2007, 07:34 AM
i agree that a coach or lessons would prob also be necessary. i don't think someone could learn all they need to know by themselves. just too much info that you can't pick up by reading a book or watching videos. also, VIDEO TAPE YOURSELF to get a good look at what your strokes are really like. could really be eye opening, it was for me.

ZPTennis
10-22-2007, 09:37 AM
Your chances of reaching 4.5 in 2 years starting from scratch are extremely low. No matter what, you will have to already have a very athletic background for it to even be possible.

As you improve in tennis, you will have ups and downs. Its not all up. You can have several months in a row where you are not playing as well as you were. Every single player out there has slumps.

You will need to be able to learn and execute all the shots in the game at a fairly high level, and be able to do it in matches.

You will also need to have lots of match experience and obviously the only way you do that is by playing many different people.

When you lose in matches it hurts your confidence, no matter how mentally strong you are.

Confidence plays a huge role in determing how fast you improve, and yet you will have to put your confidence at risk every time you play a match.

Supernatural_Serve
10-22-2007, 09:55 AM
You will also need to have lots of match experience and obviously the only way you do that is by playing many different people. Even former professional athletes taking up tennis with more foot speed and eye hand coordination than almost all 4.5s will stumble on this hurdle even if they've got all the strokes down in little time.

junbumkim
10-23-2007, 11:10 AM
the truth is, it's mostly function of your athleticism, age, time spent on court with proper coaching along with a few other factors.

If you are 12 years old and can take 1~2 private lesson every week and you can play 4 times a week in a year, you can probably move up to 4.5. I have seen people move up to low end of 4.5 pretty in a couple of years but they were very athletic..

If you are 18, and can only play once ~ twice a week, I'd say no.

So tell us your situaton and we can probably tell you more detailed answer.

smoothtennis
10-23-2007, 11:23 AM
Moving from 3.0 to 3.5 in even two weeks, really won't tell you this. You could be super athletic, and block everything and get this result.

The only way to keep progressing above 3.5 no matter what, is to have a strong focus on technique that allows power and accuracy to be generated. Without solid fundamental technique, the road past 4.0 is very daunting.

r2473
10-23-2007, 02:26 PM
I made a thread sorta like this around two months ago, but im wondering if its realistic to get to 4.5 in two years of playing if i went to 3.0-3.5 in 6 months. And is it really that much harder to move up a level in skill after 3.5?

It's easy and you can do it in no time. Here is what you do:

Q: "Dude, what level are you?"

A: "4.5"

And magically, you are a 4.5. Lot's of people do it. You can too!!!

WildVolley
10-23-2007, 04:11 PM
The only chance is to be a good athlete in the first place. Start out by taking professional lessons and start at the very beginning with proper form. Then, practice every day against opponents who are better than you and spend hours drilling.

It does happen sometimes, but I'd bet it is a rare event. Most people don't have the spare time to develop their game that quickly. However, even if you don't reach that level in a short period of time, proper practice habits and serious study of the game will make it possible to become a real player. Most of the world's tennis players will never develop into 4.5-players their whole lives.

Nellie
10-23-2007, 04:37 PM
As other said, what are you working with? How tall are you? What other sports do you do? How much are you going to practice? How much are you
going to spend in lessons? how good are your hitting partners? How mentally tough are you?

If you are one a high school team, practicing 5 days a week, of course you can improve.

I have a buddy, 6'5" 25 year old former semi-pro volleyball player who just started this year who is easily serving 130 mph consistently. He has no backhand but runs around so fast and mostly serves and volleys. He can already beat 4.0s about half the time in a competitive league and should easily be 4.5-5.0 next year.

As other says, it is more of the exception than the rules. I notice, particularly with women, since there is such a variance in physical talent, that a beginner can be really competitive at 4.5 in a short time.

dcottrill
10-23-2007, 05:05 PM
It's easy and you can do it in no time. Here is what you do:

Q: "Dude, what level are you?"

A: "4.5"

And magically, you are a 4.5. Lot's of people do it. You can too!!!

ALRIGHT!!!! As of this moment, I am a 4.5!!! 8)

jasoncho92
10-23-2007, 06:26 PM
Im 15, 5' 10", played soccer for around 8 years, play around 8 hours a week, took lessons before but not taking them now, all hitting partners around 4.0, and i dont really know my mental toughness.

Trinity TC
10-23-2007, 07:04 PM
Im 15, 5' 10", played soccer for around 8 years, play around 8 hours a week, took lessons before but not taking them now, all hitting partners around 4.0, and i dont really know my mental toughness.
Sounds promising if your hitting partners are legit 4.0s with the tournament results to varify that rating. On the other hand, self-rating is meaningless...you have to have tournament results to back up your rating.

jasoncho92
10-23-2007, 08:14 PM
I never asked what ranking they are but i know the guys i play with are 4.0 because theyve been playing everyday for like 6 years lol. They dont have nice strokes but theyre consistent with pretty good accuracy. All i know is that theyre quite a bit better than me

herosol
10-23-2007, 09:55 PM
i dont think its impossible. ive played for a little more then a year ( i started late )

But i've found alot of good coaches, played way too much, and with all truth learned many things via this forum.

so i would say according to what i've read and videos i watched i would be around a 3.5

so yea. way too much includes almost entire noon till night of tennis.
yea im a bit crazy. :D

kevhen
10-24-2007, 12:00 PM
It took me 6 years to go from 3.5 to USTA rated 4.5 and most of my friends I started with are still 3.5 or 4.0. It does get harder as you move up and I have no goals of 5.0, just plan to keep improving where I can (forehand can improve for sure) and try to keep my 4.5 rating for awhile.

Seifersquall1
10-24-2007, 12:02 PM
It's not impossible. I've been playing for 4 months and I think I am 3.5 at the moment.

Trinity TC
10-24-2007, 01:24 PM
I never asked what ranking they are but i know the guys i play with are 4.0 because theyve been playing everyday for like 6 years lol. They dont have nice strokes but theyre consistent with pretty good accuracy. All i know is that theyre quite a bit better than me
Good...you sound stoked and you've got good hitting partners. You can accomplish or exceed your goals if you continue to hook up with good people. One warning: you will go through stretches where you suck and it will feel like you are learning slower than normal (or not at all)...a deadline can get in the way...so take your time. Tennis is about patience too. 8-)

jasoncho92
10-24-2007, 03:01 PM
It's not impossible. I've been playing for 4 months and I think I am 3.5 at the moment.
This is just so you dont overrate yourself but just post a vid of you playing and ask people to rate you. And i think im improving right now but i need to work on my serve quite a bit. So in 1 year and 4 months, ill post and say if im a 4.5 lol

Seifersquall1
10-24-2007, 04:05 PM
This is just so you dont overrate yourself but just post a vid of you playing and ask people to rate you. And i think im improving right now but i need to work on my serve quite a bit. So in 1 year and 4 months, ill post and say if im a 4.5 lol
Well, my video camera is broken cause my uncle borrowed it and then his sons ruined it. My coach rated me a 3.5
My forehand has good control, awesome power, and decent spin.
Backhands are consistent, moderate power, and good spin. The backhand slice is the safest shot for me. It stays pretty low and is deep.
1st serves have good kick and power but there is not much control
2nd serves are a little slower but have more kick and well controled
Volleys: I have good footwork in net plays.
Forhand volleys are deep, well directional, and good power.
Backhand volleys have more control and a little bit of power.
Overheads are usually out.

So serves and overheads are the ones I need to work on :D