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View Full Version : Will 0.14 oz difference between the same two racquets make them play differently?


centercourt8
10-23-2007, 04:05 PM
Hello!!

I have been playing with a k95 18x20 and just recently got a new one. There is a 0.14 oz difference between the two, will this change the playing characteristics between the two? If so how do i go about matching the racquets, more specifically, where to put the lead to match the weight and balance.

Thanks very much!!

drakulie
10-23-2007, 04:07 PM
According to many of the "coaches" on these boards, the heavier one will drop you at least half a NTRP level. So if you are a 4.0 with the lighter one, you will be a 3.5 with the heavier one.

centercourt8
10-23-2007, 04:20 PM
Ok now your scaring me!! But luckily for me i do hear a bit of sarcasm in your voice. In your experience, is this difference noticable? I really am truly concerned because im a bit ocd about these things.

LPShanet
10-23-2007, 04:31 PM
Hello!!

I have been playing with a k95 18x20 and just recently got a new one. There is a 0.14 oz difference between the two, will this change the playing characteristics between the two? If so how do i go about matching the racquets, more specifically, where to put the lead to match the weight and balance.

Thanks very much!!

I have to assume that the previous poster was kidding...in which case it was pretty funny. .14 ounces is 4 grams, which is less than half of the accepted tolerances for most manufacturers. That means that basically, this is an expected variation, and depending on your level and sensitivity, there's very little chance you'll be able to actually tell. In fact, for Wilson a 4 gram variance is pretty good!

However, if you want to get totally technical about it and match the two, you need to get very accurate spec info about your frames. You'll need the exact weight (preferably in grams, since they're easier to work with and lead tape is usually measured in grams), the balance point, and the swingweight. Without all three, it's impossible to tell you how the play THEORETICALLY would be affected or where to place your lead. With a total difference of 4 grams, though, I'm guessing it won't be worth the trouble unless the difference turns out to be all in one spot on the racquet (highly unlikely).

Since you said you had one previously and just got the second one new, please keep in mind that there are other factors that could throw off your measurements. After using a racquet, it absorbs sweat, which can change your weight by more than the 4 grams we're talking about here. That's just an example...other things that vary include overgrips, vibration devices, head tape, type of string (yes, they weight different amounts), etc. So if it's the new racquet that's lighter, I wouldn't change a thing yet...it may turn out that they're exactly the same...lucky you.

What's your level of play?

lucu
10-23-2007, 04:36 PM
2 grams won't be noticable, but 5 grams is day & night for me.
it felt different and affect the swing-weight.

drakulie
10-23-2007, 05:27 PM
Ok now your scaring me!! But luckily for me i do hear a bit of sarcasm in your voice. In your experience, is this difference noticable? I really am truly concerned because im a bit ocd about these things.

LOL. Glad you got my sarcasm. Depending on how sensistive you are, I highly doubt you will notice a difference.

Good luck, it's a great frame.

galatti
10-23-2007, 09:04 PM
Hello!!

I have been playing with a k95 18x20 and just recently got a new one. There is a 0.14 oz difference between the two, will this change the playing characteristics between the two? If so how do i go about matching the racquets, more specifically, where to put the lead to match the weight and balance.

Thanks very much!!

Don't worry. You won't die :) This variations is perfectly normal, and you can have equivalents variances just by adding an overgrip for instance.

tbini87
10-23-2007, 09:11 PM
you prob won't even notice any difference. and they won't play differently so don't worry about it.

centercourt8
10-24-2007, 12:02 AM
Thanks a bunch guys, i guess i was just psyching myself out. i just recently got into the whole modifying thing. :D

LPShanet- im a 4.5.

anirut
10-24-2007, 12:32 AM
It depends on WHERE that difference is. If the balance is the same for all your rackets, then the good news is, in this case, they won't make much of a difference.

But if you were to mod your racket, then 4 grams is a lot, esp at 12 o'clock.

I'd suggest you keep them in stock form, hopefully with the same balance.

saguar0
10-24-2007, 08:47 AM
I have 2 Head MG Radical Pros with 7g difference between them and, they play completely different. The heavier one is definitely harder to swing (I think it is more head heavy).

I have reduced the difference between them to, like 3 grams, but I don't want to match them completely. I use the heavier one for singles and lighter one for doubles.

the point is - not only mass difference matters but mass distribution....

my 2 cents...

Iced_jacob
10-24-2007, 09:02 AM
so fischer is the answer???

LPShanet
10-24-2007, 01:49 PM
Thanks a bunch guys, i guess i was just psyching myself out. i just recently got into the whole modifying thing. :D

LPShanet- im a 5.0.

Since you're a pretty good player, you may notice the difference a little more than lower level folks. If you were lower, I would have just told you to drop it completely.

As several people pointed out, the distribution of the weight is very important, so you need to get the swingweight and balance point of your racquets taken as well, as I mentioned in the second paragraph of my first post. A good racquet shop/tech should be able to do this for you...not easily done with accuracy yourself. If the added weight is at the handle end, and swingweights are similar, I'd highly advise you not to do much (maybe a tiny amount of lead in the handle end if it makes you feel better).

But before you do anything, make sure you play with the new one a bit! If it's the lighter of the two, it will gain a small amount of weight in the handle as you play, affecting the readings. There is a very real likelihood that you'll find them to be almost identical after a little playing with the new one (if the new one was the lighter, and not heavier of the two). If the new one is already heavier (with everything else stripped off and no strings installed), then you may want to customize, as the difference will be unlikely to get smaller.

centercourt8
10-24-2007, 07:53 PM
I have finally decided what to do, my first k95 was dead on specs and played wonderfully so im just going to send back my second k95 to TW and have them pick out the one closest to to my original k95. Luckily i weighed my first one with the crad board insert and plastic still on the handle, so i can ask for that weight to make it easier on them.

Thanks everyone!!

LPShanet
10-25-2007, 06:41 AM
I have finally decided what to do, my first k95 was dead on specs and played wonderfully so im just going to send back my second k95 to TW and have them pick out the one closest to to my original k95. Luckily i weighed my first one with the crad board insert and plastic still on the handle, so i can ask for that weight to make it easier on them.

Thanks everyone!!

I know this sounds silly, but you may be wasting your time. If you weighed both racquets with the cardboard insert and plastic still in place, you added even more variables. And since we're talking about such a small variance (4g), you may actually sabotage yourself. Companies change their packaging materials all the time, and you'll never know if they're using a different grade of cardboard, plastic wrap or elastic to secure the card. Matching things that won't be on the racquet when you play is risky. You should generally match racquets to each other with nothing on them (no overgrips, no packaging, no strings, no tape, etc.) And to send back a frame for a 4 gram variance and hope for a better result (without knowing the swingweight and distribution) is at best a waste of your time. You'll feel the swingweight more than the static weight anyway.