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View Full Version : Federer and his eye on the ball


sureshs
10-25-2007, 04:59 PM
There have been many arguments here about it. Here is a brilliant analysis.

http://revolutionarytennis.com/federervisiontechnique.html

Plisken
10-25-2007, 09:44 PM
this has been posted a few times i think but its still really good to read

NamRanger
10-26-2007, 07:26 AM
There have been many arguments here about it. Here is a brilliant analysis.

http://revolutionarytennis.com/federervisiontechnique.html


Personally I just think it's all crazy since it's written by that guy.


And yes I did read it.


There are plenty of players who don't do what Federer does and can just see the ball just as well. Examples? Agassi, Nalbandian, Hewitt, Safin (when he's not crazy) are just a few names. They strike the ball just as cleanly as Federer does, if not cleaner.

sureshs
10-26-2007, 07:40 AM
Personally I just think it's all crazy since it's written by that guy.


And yes I did read it.


There are plenty of players who don't do what Federer does and can just see the ball just as well. Examples? Agassi, Nalbandian, Hewitt, Safin (when he's not crazy) are just a few names. They strike the ball just as cleanly as Federer does, if not cleaner.

I am going to try it this evening.

All the players you mentioned have 2 handers. The article says it is more likely to help 1 handers.

Landshark
10-26-2007, 09:10 PM
There have been many arguments here about it. Here is a brilliant analysis.

http://revolutionarytennis.com/federervisiontechnique.html

Thank you for posting this up. I tried it tonight and I really like it:D

stormholloway
10-26-2007, 09:24 PM
Personally I just think it's all crazy since it's written by that guy.


And yes I did read it.


There are plenty of players who don't do what Federer does and can just see the ball just as well. Examples? Agassi, Nalbandian, Hewitt, Safin (when he's not crazy) are just a few names. They strike the ball just as cleanly as Federer does, if not cleaner.

"Cleanly" is a term thrown around a lot, quite often to describe someone who may not be the best at hitting. Federer is the best hitter of the ball in the world. He employs techniques not used, at least not effectively, by any other pro.

Hence, there is something to be learned. And just because lots of pros succeed without using these techniques doesn't mean they aren't beneficial. Those players are simply accustomed to doing things a certain way and it works for them, but if they were able to effectively implement these techniques then they would absolutely be better. There is science to it.

By the way, you lost your way in your first sentence. It's crazy because of who wrote it, not because of what is written?

stormholloway
10-26-2007, 09:30 PM
In fact the forehand's potential is stunted when the forehand emphasis is to finish on the opposite shoulder, the emphasis needs to be on a clean hit.

I agree with this a lot. I think teaching pros simplify this groundstroke so that they can get results from a student, but the emphasis should be placed on intuitive striking of the ball, not a linear philosophy of "start here and end here".

Sometimes Federer does end up over his shoulder. Sometimes his elbow is bent, other times it's straight. He makes adjustments. Federer's ideal forehand involves a straight arm stroke across truly horizontal plane with the evenly low finish, but on low, short balls I do see him abbreviate the shot with the "double bend" technique and on some quick returns he does often finish high (often over his head on the dead run).

I just think there's a lot to learn from Federer, and by taking some of this knowledge, one can improve greatly.

BeHappy
10-26-2007, 09:30 PM
"Cleanly" is a term thrown around a lot, quite often to describe someone who may not be the best at hitting. Federer is the best hitter of the ball in the world. He employs techniques not used, at least not effectively, by any other pro.

Hence, there is something to be learned. And just because lots of pros succeed without using these techniques doesn't mean they aren't beneficial. Those players are simply accustomed to doing things a certain way and it works for them, but if they were able to effectively implement these techniques then they would absolutely be better. There is science to it.

By the way, you lost your way in your first sentence. It's crazy because of who wrote it, not because of what is written?


haha

you are just crazy ;)

MTXR
10-26-2007, 10:51 PM
wow, i never even thought about this. I will definitely try this out.

goober
10-27-2007, 06:20 AM
Personally I just think it's all crazy since it's written by that guy.

.

I think that website is fine attempt to give one experienced person's view of tennis technique. I read through and try out what makes sense to me and see if it works. If it doesn't do anything for me I disregard it. The guy is not totally crazy.

Clintspin
10-28-2007, 06:45 PM
It is a load of nonsense. Watch Federer hit on any of the good video web-pages and you will see that he watches the ball out in front of the racquet just like everybody else. He just seems to keep his head still longer than other players.

tbini87
10-28-2007, 10:23 PM
either way that has really made me think about watching the ball, or for the contact point or whatever. i hope to be a little more concious of that when on the court. often times i catch myself hitting balls without even TRYING to see the ball in. no wonder i frame so many balls...

three eights
10-29-2007, 05:15 AM
To be honest i think it's a load of BS. I don't like it when tennis wannabies make pin-hair analysis of the current top talent. Like Agasse was back in his heyday. Enough over analyzing this crap, if you imitate others you'll never reach your full potential as a player. Just my opinion.

Like you can capture that nanosecond when the ball reflects from the back of your racquet... please. It's playing style more then technique to live by. Federer is number 1 because he picked up a racquet at the age of 4 and practice tennis more then most of us practice sleep.

Clintspin
10-29-2007, 06:40 AM
I think you are pretty much correct, three eights.

sureshs
10-29-2007, 07:00 AM
Thank you for posting this up. I tried it tonight and I really like it:D

I tried too, but habits are difficult to change, so actually I never tried it. I will try it again later.

jb193
10-29-2007, 10:43 AM
Well, after getting annihilated by a guy in the 1st set and down 0-2 in the second, I made a pact with myself that whatever in the world I was going to do, I was going to keep my head still and focus on the ball for the remainder of the match, absolutely no matter what. Anyway, I focused on every ball like it was my last and I came back & I evened the match. I played the best hour of tennis of my life. My opponent even asked me who came in and possessed my body because he had never seen me hit that way. Anyway, I have tried for months to re-duplicate that effort, but my emotionally fragile brain/nerves always get in the way. Take this story for what its worth because this is just my experience. Maybe keeping your head still isn't a universal principle. I am not saying it is. It worked for me, however, especially on that day......

i8myshirt
10-29-2007, 04:07 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNPaZj4yn00&search=federer%20forehand
I don't know, this video kind of disproves the statement. It seems he's just holding his head there longer.

Landshark
10-30-2007, 01:28 AM
I tried too, but habits are difficult to change, so actually I never tried it. I will try it again later.

When I tried it, there is the very likelihood that it helped me keep my eye on the ball, something that I am very bad at. So maybe it didn't work like the way Federer uses it but it helped me out anyhow. I haven't played since and really eager to try it again.