PDA

View Full Version : I became a victim of sandbagging!


Koaske
10-27-2007, 02:09 PM
So, today I had a tournament match against at level that's ~3.5 . The match was against number 4 seed, so I thought I could have a chance against him since I had played a tight match against the player seeded third ( I had lost 6-4 in the third). Well, as the match started I was quite even with him but that didn't last long. He creamed me 6-0 6-1 :D I literally couldn't do anything, since he would start pounding his flat strokes to the corners if I gave him one badly placed or slow ball.
After the match I felt quite miserable having lost that badly, until I later found out that he had won his next match 6-0 6-0. I would guess he's really ~4.0 and that he's quite a sandbagger :D
This isn't really a question or anything, I just felt like sharing it so that I can feel better :p

LafayetteHitter
10-27-2007, 02:16 PM
You mention that at the beginning of the match you were quite even. Given the 6-0 first set score how long did the even last. Somewhere in the ballpark of 30 seconds? LOL
Sucks to get smoked but it's just matter of moving on to the next one and figuring out what you could've done to step it up. Everyone takes similar losses and if they don't then they are playing people below there level and only hurting themselves.

Koaske
10-28-2007, 10:00 AM
You mention that at the beginning of the match you were quite even. Given the 6-0 first set score how long did the even last. Somewhere in the ballpark of 30 seconds? LOL


:D
By even I meant like we often went to deuce but of course he won in the end.
By the way, I just found out that he had gone and won the finals 6-1 6-1 :p

LafayetteHitter
10-28-2007, 10:03 AM
Yea I knew what you mean't I was just kidding. It's exhaustive to get to deuce a bunch of times in a set and still end up dropping games to. Tries your mental toughness to stay in it for sure.

BounceHitBounceHit
10-28-2007, 10:41 AM
:D
By even I meant like we often went to deuce but of course he won in the end.
By the way, I just found out that he had gone and won the finals 6-1 6-1 :p

Sorry because I know how frustrating this can be. We have ALL been there!! ;) However, if you went to deuce for most of the games but lost, he probably was NOT sandbagging. You were competitive, but he knows how to close out games and sets, and you probably just need to work on that aspect of the game. Best, CC

NoBadMojo
10-28-2007, 10:47 AM
he would start pounding his flat strokes to the corners if I gave him one badly placed or slow ball.
:p

altho who can say since we werent there, I disagree with those who say the guy wasnt a sandbagger. 3.5's cant do the above on any sort of regular basis

Cruzer
10-28-2007, 09:02 PM
altho who can say since we werent there, I disagree with those who say the guy wasnt a sandbagger. 3.5's cant do the above on any sort of regular basis

I know several good 3.5 singles players that can hit a badly place or slow ball in the corners 8-10 ties whcih I would consider fairly regularly. Good 3.5 singles player have quite good shot placement on slow/short balls in the court. There is quite a bit of variance among 3.5 players from one part of the country to another.

kevhen
10-29-2007, 07:55 AM
USTA should bump a guy who wins this easily very quickly to 4.0. They have a 3 strikes rule but I not sure if it works that well. He should have 3 strikes already from just this tournament with wins of 1 and 0, 0 and 0, and the final 1 and 1. USTA should jump in soon.

Drona
10-31-2007, 09:24 AM
When I moved from Salt Lake City to Austin, I registered as a 3.5 for a league. At that time I'd had some competitve matches w/ 4.0 players and figured I would be moved out of the 3.5 soon enough. I was, but down to a 3.0! It was very humbling! However, the level of tennis is very high here. This year, I've worked on my game and made it up to a 3.5. I also went to Kiawah tennis camp and they arranged matches for guests. I won all of these matches by routine scores and was surprised to find out that these blokes were 4.0 USTA in their hometowns! If I were beating their 4.0s, then I'd surely win a lot of Bagels and Breadsticks from their 3.5s!

Maybe it would be helpful to consider that your opponent is legitimate at whatever ranking he has (especially since you mention going to a lot of deuces etc), and that you need to work on your game to figure out why you're losing those critical points.

smoothtennis
10-31-2007, 09:51 AM
When I moved from Salt Lake City to Austin, I registered as a 3.5 for a league. At that time I'd had some competitve matches w/ 4.0 players and figured I would be moved out of the 3.5 soon enough. I was, but down to a 3.0! It was very humbling! However, the level of tennis is very high here. This year, I've worked on my game and made it up to a 3.5. I also went to Kiawah tennis camp and they arranged matches for guests. I won all of these matches by routine scores and was surprised to find out that these blokes were 4.0 USTA in their hometowns! If I were beating their 4.0s, then I'd surely win a lot of Bagels and Breadsticks from their 3.5s!

Maybe it would be helpful to consider that your opponent is legitimate at whatever ranking he has (especially since you mention going to a lot of deuces etc), and that you need to work on your game to figure out why you're losing those critical points.

3.5 in Texas can be pretty darn good from what I have seen first hand. Austin, Houston, San Antonio, and DFW - you get some very good 3.5's. When I say good, I mean, they can place the ball well, slice deep, and can keep the ball in play a good 5-10 hits. Some can even impose their game on you offensively.

ohplease
10-31-2007, 10:13 AM
There's a huge disparity in what you see in club tennis in general. At the end of the day, you've got to get past the guy(s) on the other side of the net.

I've seen 3.5s that looked awesome and 5.5s that didn't look like much. The distance in between those two can seem like inches or thousands of miles, depending on the day.

Consider the beat down a free lesson. You can learn some stuff if you beat someone, but you learn tons more when you lose. Right now, you learned you can't hang anything short or slow to decent players, and that at a minimum you need to work on how to consistently neutralize these guys with depth/pace/positioning. You also learned that getting to deuce isn't good enough - you need to close those games out.

Those two things right there are plenty to work on. He's hiding, and not really learning anything. You've got an opportunity that he doesn't. Use it.

drgnpride
10-31-2007, 11:14 AM
anyways if the guy is truly sandbagging you will see evidence of some intentional losses so he can 'keep his rating' (which i have seen). if he's dominating people at one level consistently, he won't be at that level for long.