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Reveille1984
12-04-2007, 02:11 PM
... Does it usually take to be contacted, for either good or bad reasons?

I'm a recent college grad, and I had an interview with an educational research company last Thursday for a position (kind of a small office, about 15 employees) and I thought it went very, very smoothly. I was interviewed by the Senior V.P. for nearly 30 minutes and was very on top of things and intelligent with my responses; she even became comfortable and started making smalltalk with me about her daughter and how I remind her of one of her old friends. I then did the same thing with the V.P. who interviewed me afterwards. I also wrote two thank you letters to them both and mailed them out the next day (Friday).

It's now Tuesday afternoon, and my super confident attitude is slowly being replaced by doubts as the days go by lol. I'm kind of figuring that if they were interested they would have let me know by now since it's such a tiny company, but most people are telling me not to call until at least a week has gone by. I guess the one fault I had was not asking about the follow-up process. What's the best way to go about this?

raiden031
12-04-2007, 02:15 PM
I have had numerous interviews and some have told me during the interview that they were making an offer, and others it took 1-3 days. One time I got a rejection notice in the mail the next day, and once or twice I never heard back from them. It really varies based on the company and their needs. I would suggest calling them back maybe tomorrow or the next day and ask what the status is.

10s talk
12-04-2007, 02:57 PM
you never know, a lot of people don't even have the decency to contact you.

jmsx521
12-04-2007, 06:06 PM
In my experience most of the corporatists are ignorant, and don't bother to return your call to let you know what happened, because if you are not valuable to them then it's just waste of time and money for them to show decency.

On another note, I had a potential employer once; after the interview he insisted to walk with me to the parking lot. I was a bit confused and couldn't understand why. Only when he got close to my cheap car, I understood it was actually my 2nd evaluation... to see what kind of car I drive, cheap or expensive. I almost had a smirk on my face, while he and I were saying good bye. So, my skilled qualifications were good enough to qualify me for that 2nd evaluation... which failed me.

OrangeOne
12-04-2007, 06:12 PM
On another note, I had a potential employer once; after the interview he insisted to walk with me to the parking lot. I was a bit confused and couldn't understand why. Only when he got close to my cheap car, I understood it was actually my 2nd evaluation... to see what kind of car I drive, cheap or expensive. I almost had a smirk on my face, while he and I were saying good bye. So, my skilled qualifications were good enough to qualify me for that 2nd evaluation... which failed me.

This one loses me... why would the car you drove to the interview matter? What if you'd borrowed it from a friend and your Ferrari was getting a service?

Surely if it was a job where the car mattered (maybe real-estate where you'd be expected to drive clients around) they'd either provide one or ask you formally what car you had, and if it's any other form of job - it just wouldn't matter?

Some people are silly.

Fee
12-04-2007, 06:13 PM
I agree, so many places don't bother to contact you at all. A week is probably a decent amount of time to wait before making a follow up call. Some companies are very fast, some are very slow. I worked for a large government agency recently and they were all over the place when hiring for certain positions.

yodudedudeyo
12-04-2007, 06:48 PM
I read somewhere that it's good for you to call back the interviewer within the first couple of days. But again, it's a vague memory.

CAM178
12-04-2007, 07:10 PM
My only question to you is: why do you only have one thing cooking? Get as many job offers in line as possible, so that you can indeed choose the best opportunity.

As to them getting back to you, I've had some where it was not for 6 weeks after. I got the job, though (Rx sales).

jj300
12-04-2007, 08:08 PM
as someone in the hr field I would advise waiting at least 1 week before calling the company. Last thing you want to do is to be too pushy. Just because the company is small does not mean they are not super busy, on the contrary many of such companies are packed with more stuff than they can handle each and every day. If i may say so, you seem a little sure of yourself of the interview and i would highly caution you not to lower your guard in future communications with the company. Be as alert and stop on topic just as the first 2 minutes of the interview.

where I work I make it a point to contact everyone that applies for a position I'm handling BESIDES entry level openings. WHY? you may ask? It's simple really: TIME. I often get upwards of 200 applicants for a single job opening, if i had to contact each and everyone of them to explain y they were not qualified, i will have no time left for other work projects. Also keep in mind that once a job has been posted, many companies do not remove the job postings form the internet, as a result you could be applying to a job that has already been filled and a file no one looks in. this may explain y sometimes you never get a phone call back. best of luck on your job offer

Reveille1984
12-04-2007, 09:16 PM
Its not really that I'm sure of myself, I've just never had an interview flow so smoothly before and go so well, it was crazy. I researched the company forever and was really prepared, as this is a position that I am very highly interested in (I had a research concentration with Sociology and a minor in Child Development, so educational research was a perfect fit). I just thought it was odd to hear no response after they seemed so excited about me, but I guess that's how it goes sometimes.

The job was specifically posted on an entry level college grad job site, so most applicants were most-likey in that bracket. The one thing giving me a bit of hope is that they took over 3 weeks to contact me after I had originally applied (even though it said "position available ASAP!"), so maybe they're just backed up or slow with the hiring process. It's kind of hard to get lots of offers lined up in my field as an entry level applicant with minimal work experience, but I'm definitely keeping at it (although it is one of the most frustrating things ever!). Thanks for all the advice.

jj300
12-05-2007, 08:07 AM
you are correct about the 3 week assumption for the first contact. if the job was posted on a site for college grads, chances are they have plenty of applies and it just takes a long time to go through all of them. give them a week and then call or e-mail the people you interviewed with if you have their contact info. also I want to commend you on your use of thank you cards after the interview, they make a huge HUGE difference and often do make the difference between hired or no call back. best of luck to you

Supernatural_Serve
12-05-2007, 08:16 AM
Just because your interview went perfectly doesn't mean that 10 others haven't gone more perfectly ahead of you.

You can't assume anything until an offer is in writing in your hands, and even then, its not a sure deal.

At a major Wall st. firm, right after 911 we stopped interviewing, closed all open positions, and didn't honor job offers in writing that were sent in the 2 weeks prior to 9/11, even when people had accepted and already resigned from their current employers.

Fee
12-05-2007, 10:38 AM
I worked in the HR division of a large public agency and we notified EVERY applicant in writing about the status of their application. Yes, we used generic form letters, mail merged with Excel and Word, but every applicant for any position at that company knew where they stood by the time a recruitment was over, even if it took a while. As someone who has been on both sides of this, I feel there is NO EXCUSE for not responding to every applicant.

max
12-05-2007, 01:42 PM
For you Human Resources folks, let me just toss in my two cents: it makes your company look lousy and miserable if you don't get back to people one way or another, even with generic forms.

To me, it makes it look as though the company's just struggling to stay in business if it can't handle the basics like that.

Another poor-form thing for HR: not disclosing the range they're willing to pay you for working for the company, while pushing and pressing possible employees for their salary history. A basic unfair bargaining tactic, which also has a cheap feel.

10s talk
12-05-2007, 01:55 PM
I worked in the HR division of a large public agency and we notified EVERY applicant in writing about the status of their application. Yes, we used generic form letters, mail merged with Excel and Word, but every applicant for any position at that company knew where they stood by the time a recruitment was over, even if it took a while. As someone who has been on both sides of this, I feel there is NO EXCUSE for not responding to every applicant.

I agree, if you take time for an interview you deserve a response.

I have been promised a response several times, and never gottten one.

CAM178
12-05-2007, 02:04 PM
I just go ahead and assume that most companies will not get back to me. Most of the time I'm right. If I want the job, I will follow up with them. I'm doing that now with a medical sales company. Hope they don't wait too long, as I am in the latter stages with a couple of other firms.

jj300
12-05-2007, 09:05 PM
your company must have had a good legal department, or the applicants were brush offs because i'm pretty certain you were open to lawsuits. especially when applicants left their previous jobs open the offer letter from your company. the only thing that can happen for you to be able to withdraw the job offer is if the background check, drug test, or any contingent tests came back as failed. not sure but i do know i would likely pursue legal action if a company did that to me.



Just because your interview went perfectly doesn't mean that 10 others haven't gone more perfectly ahead of you.

You can't assume anything until an offer is in writing in your hands, and even then, its not a sure deal.

At a major Wall st. firm, right after 911 we stopped interviewing, closed all open positions, and didn't honor job offers in writing that were sent in the 2 weeks prior to 9/11, even when people had accepted and already resigned from their current employers.