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LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 07:57 PM
I'm not so sure if this is the right place to inquire about something like this, but here goes.

So I'm 16 years old, currently a junior at High School, and I've been thinking of things I could do for my last summer of my pre-college life. Specifically social work, but not the kind people fly over to New Orleans to do, I want to go to Africa-where it's really needed the most.

That's where I need help. I really want to do social work in Africa; I've been doing menial work at my dads hospital (he's a doctor) for the past two years, just filing papers that don't mean anything. But I have a chance to really do something now, since my cousin's worked with various NGO's (even the UN at one point) in Africa, she's letting me either stay with her in a safe country, or she said she would find me an NGO or a program in a safe area of Africa, obviously in a safer country. It's something I really want to do, and it's not a desire that resembles going to a concert or seeing hannah montana, its the real deal.

My parents said no, at first. They think my cousin's crazy, for various reasons (she's a doctor and works for less than 50k in undeveloped African countries at 34), and they feel that they know a hell of a lot more than I do. They're right, but so wrong as well. They argue that its unsafe politically, something that wouldn't be applicable in a safer region (though no place is completely safe) and their central argument lies in the diseases.

They're doctors, and they know diseases, but don't you think that with proper vaccinations and practical measures in a safer area of Africa (no fornicating or hanging out with monkeys, not that I would do those let alone in Africa)?

If I find a safe NGO in a safe country, then why can't I go right? I know the risks, I know its dangerous from the moment I step onto the plan to the moment I get home or even after. I know that there are many medical mysteries and non-treatable aliments that sprang out of Africa. I'm sixteen, by the summer nearly seventeen, so I'm not exactly what you would call a naive, imprudent, child. I'm a cautious person, and I know the risks.

So, I really want to do this but I need help convincing my parents, and/or finding a safe place in Africa (do you know of any?).

Any/all help would be appreciated, and sorry for making this thread/post verbose and almost excessive with information.

LanEvo
12-05-2007, 07:59 PM
say this is an experience you would like to see for once in your life and that it could be a life changing moment if u miss it

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:01 PM
say this is an experience you would like to see for once in your life and that it could be a life changing moment if u miss it

tried that. They came up with some witty answers, like the change being that I die of some unknown disease or get kidnapped and never heard from again.

Lakoste
12-05-2007, 08:04 PM
Why so Gong Ho on Africa? There are people in NY that are in need of help too.

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:08 PM
Why so Gong Ho on Africa? There are people in NY that are in need of help too.

There are lots of factors.
I've already worked at some places in Ny, and nothing I did was really much of a help; even the salvation army (unfortunately) provides expired goods to the homeless, something I can actually attest to.

I'm also big on traveling, love it. Been all around europe, india, australia,the u.s, and Africa is/always has been somewhere I really want to go.

I'm probably never going to get an opportunity like this again in my life, and it looks great on the college apps. I probably need that as well.

tbini87
12-05-2007, 08:19 PM
not much you can do, only being 16 years old. just keep letting them know how much it would mean to you. but ultimately it is their choice, and whatever they choose, remember they are looking out for your best interest, and really care about you.

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:28 PM
not much you can do, only being 16 years old. just keep letting them know how much it would mean to you. but ultimately it is their choice, and whatever they choose, remember they are looking out for your best interest, and really care about you.

yes I realize that, but this kind of opportunity doesn't come around often, and I hope they can take that into account. After all they let my sister live as far away as australia for 5 months, why can't they let me live 2,000 miles closer to home.

angharad
12-05-2007, 08:44 PM
You've said twice that volunteer work you've done - working at your father's hospital and with the Salvation Army - "didn't really matter". If that's your attitude on it, why would your parents let you go to Africa to do more volunteer work that you could end up saying "didn't really matter"? There are plenty of volunteer opportunities closer to home. If you're concerned about the fact that the Salvation Army gives expired food to people, then start a fundraiser or food drive to get non-expired food to give to people. Volunteer at a soup kitchen, or homeless shelter, or a Boy's or Girl's Club, or a Big Brother/Big Sister organisation. Show that you're committed to and serious about helping people, and maybe they'll reconsider. If your parents don't reconsider, start looking at things to do once you're 18. Or look at more local short-term programs, like weekends or school vacations spent helping charities like Habitat for Humanity. I did some charity work abroad - in safe regions and with known organisations - before I turned 18, then spent some time in a Peace Corps-like organisation once in college. What it really comes down to, though, is that you don't need to be in a specific place to make a difference, you just need to have a specific frame of mind.

abenguyen
12-05-2007, 08:45 PM
well you have to find that legitimate reason to go. i assumed you tried the, "i'm helping people in this world" statement already. parents are well, parents. they are stubborn and want to keep their children safe. my parents are the same way. there will come a point when your parents will have to realize that they can't protect you forever. i think you should sit down with them and have a calm conversation about it. look at the positives. write them down on paper. if they have excuses, find reasons to counter them.

good luck

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:56 PM
You've said twice that volunteer work you've done - working at your father's hospital and with the Salvation Army - "didn't really matter". If that's your attitude on it, why would your parents let you go to Africa to do more volunteer work that you could end up saying "didn't really matter"?

I think we're thinking about different things.

At my dad's hospital, I meant "not making a difference" literally. All I was doing was cutting away papers from the secretaries, who are paid by the hour, so if anything my volunteer work cuts away from their pay.
And the salvation army, my main concern wasn't the expired food, it was that there's a lot of people doing the work. Lots of people do work for the SA, but not nearly as many do work for individual regions in Africa where the help is direly needed. There are homeless people here and in places like Rwanda, the difference being that NYC has shelters and volunteer helpers, whereas Rwanda barely gets any help from anyone let alone international organizations. Not that I would go to Rwanda, that country is almost as dangerous as it was in 1994.

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:57 PM
well you have to find that legitimate reason to go. i assumed you tried the, "i'm helping people in this world" statement already. parents are well, parents. they are stubborn and want to keep their children safe. my parents are the same way. there will come a point when your parents will have to realize that they can't protect you forever. i think you should sit down with them and have a calm conversation about it. look at the positives. write them down on paper. if they have excuses, find reasons to counter them.

good luck

Thank you for the advice. Great perspective.

LarougeNY
12-05-2007, 08:59 PM
What it really comes down to, though, is that you don't need to be in a specific place to make a difference, you just need to have a specific frame of mind.

I can see many instances where thats true, but it's not always true. Its almost like justifying the prison guards at aushwitz, their view of good depended on their frame of mind. I don't mean to offend anyone or belittle the post, but I don't agree with the frame of mind theory. While it does carry its significance, so does working an a specific place-a place where help is not most readily found.

Photoshop
12-05-2007, 09:13 PM
Write a 5 page paper on why you want go to Africa and how safe it is to volunteer there. Prepare some Powerpoint slides, too. Announce a family meeting on Saturday night and do a presentation.

goober
12-05-2007, 09:22 PM
I'm probably never going to get an opportunity like this again in my life, and it looks great on the college apps. I probably need that as well.

You could not be more wrong. You can spend as much time as you want as an adult doing these types of things if that is what you really want-during college, after college, as your first job.

angharad
12-05-2007, 09:38 PM
I think we're thinking about different things.

At my dad's hospital, I meant "not making a difference" literally. All I was doing was cutting away papers from the secretaries, who are paid by the hour, so if anything my volunteer work cuts away from their pay.
And the salvation army, my main concern wasn't the expired food, it was that there's a lot of people doing the work. Lots of people do work for the SA, but not nearly as many do work for individual regions in Africa where the help is direly needed. There are homeless people here and in places like Rwanda, the difference being that NYC has shelters and volunteer helpers, whereas Rwanda barely gets any help from anyone let alone international organizations. Not that I would go to Rwanda, that country is almost as dangerous as it was in 1994.

Doing something as trivial seeming as paperwork can free up a secretary for more important matters. That's my point - you don't see it as something that makes any difference, and that reflects on you. If it's not something you're committed to, or enjoy, your parents will pick up on that and possibly look at it as your attitude towards most volunteer work. I agree that NYC is obviously going to have more volunteers than somewhere like Rwanda, but that's not to say that you have to be in Rwanda (or anywhere else) to help that place. You can start or work for fundraising initiatives that will provide money to those places, for example. It's not the same as being there, certainly, but it can be just as rewarding.

I can see many instances where thats true, but it's not always true. Its almost like justifying the prison guards at aushwitz, their view of good depended on their frame of mind. I don't mean to offend anyone or belittle the post, but I don't agree with the frame of mind theory. While it does carry its significance, so does working an a specific place-a place where help is not most readily found.

I'm sorry, but I have absolutely no idea how you can jump from "the only thing you need to help people is the frame of mind of helping people" to "justifying the prison guards at Auschwitz." That's quite a leap of logic, and you grossly misunderstood my point. Again, you don't need to be somewhere to help that place or its people. All you need is the focus and determination to do some good in the world.

I can understand you wanting to go to Africa. There are beautiful places there, and there are definitely areas and people that need lots of help. But there are plenty of ways to help those people without actually going there in the case that your parents don't reconsider. There are also plenty of places "closer to home" that could do with the help.

Breakaz54z
12-05-2007, 10:01 PM
You could not be more wrong. You can spend as much time as you want as an adult doing these types of things if that is what you really want-during college, after college, as your first job.

I agree. With a one year of undergrad left, I can say for sure that there are tons and tons of volunteer opportunities available through colleges for places around the world if you look hard enough. If you really want to Africa, could you wait until college? It's understandable that you have a great desire to go to Africa for experience and make a difference whatever you can, but you also need to do a reality check.

I myself wanted to jump on the opportunity to volunteer in Africa last summer but both my parents and the organization wouldn't allow it because of the risks. The team that was sent over was very small as well due to the risks and costs. I'm not sure where you would be situated in Africa but especially if you're going to be working in close proximity to ill individuals, the probability of contracting any sort of infection while working there is extremely high. This is even in spite of all mandatory and optionals vaccinations.

So if you still really want to go to developing country to help make a difference, why not one that is less volatile and less chances of catching a disease? If you still insist on going to Africa, ask your sister to see if she can arrange meetings with those who have done field work in Africa so they can tell you first hand about what it's like. Then if you still want to go after that, organize the information they have given to you and make your case with your parents.

Best of luck to you and remember, you have the rest of your life to help others in need.

power_play21
12-06-2007, 12:40 AM
not much you can do, only being 16 years old.

This pretty much sums it up.


I'm in the process of becoming a doctor. As such, I've had my fair share of experience and view points handed down to me from very knowledgeable people.

I hope I can pass these on to you as I've also had the opportunity to experience most myself.

I have been to Africa on 2 occasions, 3 with a personal trip, but 2 on work, volunteer.

First things first, at this point in your life, there is really not anything significant you can accomplish over there except look around. You wont be in contact with the people who really need the help, you can make a bigger difference where you are right now, if that's your goal.

Number 2, what you said about a once in a lifetime opportunity is pretty much an immature 'immediacy' view of something you want. Especially if you go into a health field, these opportunities will knock on your door weekly, but most likely you'll turn them down. 'Everyone' is idealistic at one point and wants to help in Africa, then, when they are doctors and have the pressures of family, wanting more money, that new boat so you can hang out with you new friends etc, you now have kids you want to spend time with, and on and on, and most likely you will the one turning them down.

So, what I can tell you is, hang on to that desire to go there and help, but do it when you actually have a clue about what that means, and how you can do it.

Number 3, Africa is not what you think it is.

Everyone I know that has gone there, that i met there, had no clue what it was when they went. They thought they could go and help, that you will affect them, in a good way, and that that's whats gonna happen. Maybe you think you will "change' and "grow as a person" but thats really a naive and immature feeling from someone who is young and never been there. Thats okay though, as its a noble feeling, and what leads people to help.

However, as it turns out, someone who is not ready both professionally, emotionally and psychologically to go there and help, will probably get affected the other way around.

What I mean by this is what happens is you think your gonna go, help, change, but your the one that gets changed, depressed, disgusted, homesick and those are feelings i am well familiar with from my first trip.

Africa really is an illusion. People think its bad there. Well, its not bad, its miserable. And not only to the people there, but for people who go as well. Now, I;m not talking about the five stars hotel in the beautiful South Africa. Im talking Rwanda, like you mention yourself.

Its really hard to put all this in text in a tennis forum, but another really good tip is, listen to your parents. They do know way more then you, and they do know what is best for you. Sometimes we're young and adventurous, and we think things that arent in parellel with the reality of things.

So my advice to you would be to hang on to your desire to help, and do it when the time is right.

Just another note on some parts in Africa, where the help needs to be done. I went to a village to vaccinate people on the second day I was there. I ha diarrhea, and was throwing up all day. Everything there is differnet, food, customs, etc, people get sick. Mix that with the smell in some places. Smell is pretty much the first thing that hit me hard when i went there. Its unexplainable. You say you went to india, did you go through smaller cities, poorer regions, where people kind of die in the midle of the street an rivers? Remember that smell that makes you want to disappear? Mix that with diarrhea, a bunch of crying kids, head as big as their bodies, flies ALL OVER the place, and you having to still do your job, hungry as heck because you couldnt eat the last few nights. Thats what its like to do work there in the really impoverished parts, that is a sum of my experiences in my first trip.

Im sure youll have many opportunities to go there. Just really give it thought if this is something you want to do and your ready to do, and you think that is worth the effort, or its something you want to write a paragraph about in your college application.

origmarm
12-06-2007, 01:16 AM
Mate I would wait untill college if you have specific plans. Or as is traditional in the UK, where they go the year between school and college, you could use an organisation with specialises in "youth volunteering". For your parents in terms of mitigating the risk there are various organisations that specialise in sending "gap year" students to do this kind of thing, you might find they can cater to you also. My brother (18 ) is going to Uganda in January (to teach English however) for 6 months on such a scheme.

If you google "gap year volunteering" or similar you'll come up with pages of such organisations, I'm sure you'll find one to suit you in there if you decide to pursue that route. Its definitely more parent friendly from what I can see.

That said if you have family that do this sort of thing already they probably know far more about this than the organisations do. Just thinking it might mitigate the "concerned parents" factor if its seen as organised and in a group format

Edit: Reading the posts below, this would seem to be a soft option way of doing this kind of trip. That said help is help, however it comes. I think the key is to make sure that any organisation represents what you want to achieve, not a "volunteer holiday"

Deuce
12-06-2007, 01:33 AM
Why so Gong Ho on Africa? There are people in NY that are in need of help too.
^ Indeed.
While not as 'glamorous' as Africa, it is just as needed, and just as important to help people here.

You've said twice that volunteer work you've done - working at your father's hospital and with the Salvation Army - "didn't really matter". If that's your attitude on it, why would your parents let you go to Africa to do more volunteer work that you could end up saying "didn't really matter"? There are plenty of volunteer opportunities closer to home. If you're concerned about the fact that the Salvation Army gives expired food to people, then start a fundraiser or food drive to get non-expired food to give to people. Volunteer at a soup kitchen, or homeless shelter, or a Boy's or Girl's Club, or a Big Brother/Big Sister organisation. Show that you're committed to and serious about helping people, and maybe they'll reconsider. If your parents don't reconsider, start looking at things to do once you're 18. Or look at more local short-term programs, like weekends or school vacations spent helping charities like Habitat for Humanity. I did some charity work abroad - in safe regions and with known organisations - before I turned 18, then spent some time in a Peace Corps-like organisation once in college. What it really comes down to, though, is that you don't need to be in a specific place to make a difference, you just need to have a specific frame of mind.
^ Good, reasoned post.

You could not be more wrong. You can spend as much time as you want as an adult doing these types of things if that is what you really want-during college, after college, as your first job.
^ Yup.

To the OP - if you're honestly 16 - which I question due to the fact that you express your thoughts better than anyone else on this board -,there will still be plenty of help needed in Africa in 5 years, 10 years, 15 years...
A 16 year old's experience is minimal. While the 16 year old may honestly feel that he is experienced and mature enough to handle certain circumstances, those who know better tend to know better.

Fee
12-06-2007, 11:08 AM
Larouge,
I say that you need to respect your parents and listen to them. You are 16 and they are the ones supporting you. When you are 18, legally an adult, and paying your own bills, you can do whatever you want. Africa will still be there, and still need your help.

I agree with those who say that there is plenty of need for your services in New York. If that doesn't appeal to you for some reason, perhaps you can spend a summer in a clinic in the deep South or the Appalachian region. I sure the health problems, poverty, and oppression there will be good preparation for you.

I admire your desire to serve, but please be realistic and spend some time at home where you are a little bit safer.

LarougeNY
12-06-2007, 11:24 AM
basically everything you just said.

I don't even know what to say. I guess it seems very childish and naive. I mean, the prospect of going is utterly captivating, yet the reality (especially the reality you express) stops that desire dead in its tracks.

I guess I just couldn't just accept it from my parents, but you're right. Along with just about everyone that commented, and thank you. Although you're experiences counter those of my cousin (yes the same eccentric one) I'm guessing thats due to some undue bias, on her part.

Honestly, your point is quite penetrating, and comprehensively persuasive. You're right, if anyone should volunteer its someone of your stature, someone who can make a difference because of knowledge gained in early adulthood and med school.

The reality check, it seems, booted in after reading all this. This trip, though, is something to counter a boring life. I guess with school, and everyone around me going to parties where they drink, get high, fornicate etc., I feel I'm missing out on the adventure (and/or doing stupid things)and this seemed to be a suitable channel to gain it though.

I guess one of the reasons I want to go so badly is because I want to change. Life, as cliche as it may sound, is pretty boring at the moment. I have some friends that are going to India, some to New Orleans, and I'm sure some are sticking around NY, but I don't think they'll be as down-to-earth experiences as would be africa. Your personal experience would throw any sane person away from the idea, at least anyone my age, but I was kind of hoping for one of those life changing experiences that would change your perspective on life, lead to a greater value, and bring about (as Buddhist as it may sound) a self discovery. I can see though, with the circumstances given, that this may be even more of a juvenile hope than anything else I've said. And yes, I would've liked to put something like this on college apps, maybe talk about it in an interview, but not if I have an experience like yours.

Once again thank you power play, I guess your logic and pragmatism is incontrovertible in this argument/discussion/education of an idealist. I just hate it when urges and obviously naive, juvenile fantasies (like a teenager making a difference in a third world country) take over. Thanks again.

LarougeNY
12-06-2007, 11:27 AM
To the OP - if you're honestly 16 - which I question due to the fact that you express your thoughts better than anyone else on this board -,there will still be plenty of help needed in Africa in 5 years, 10 years, 15 years...
A 16 year old's experience is minimal. While the 16 year old may honestly feel that he is experienced and mature enough to handle certain circumstances, those who know better tend to know better.

I don't think I've ever been complemented like that before, so thank you very much. That's one of the greatest complements I could receive, and from a completely anonymous source; Thank you so much. And yes, this point is pretty undeniable. I guess the wisdom can be bitter at first, but invaluable in the long run.

LarougeNY
12-06-2007, 11:29 AM
Larouge,
I say that you need to respect your parents and listen to them. You are 16 and they are the ones supporting you. When you are 18, legally an adult, and paying your own bills, you can do whatever you want. Africa will still be there, and still need your help.

I agree with those who say that there is plenty of need for your services in New York. If that doesn't appeal to you for some reason, perhaps you can spend a summer in a clinic in the deep South or the Appalachian region. I sure the health problems, poverty, and oppression there will be good preparation for you.

I admire your desire to serve, but please be realistic and spend some time at home where you are a little bit safer.


Reality can be so annoying at times, much like it is now. Once again, the realism is an unbeatable card. Thank you very much for the advice. Patience, it seems, is truly a virtue-hopefully it grows as people do.

abenguyen
12-06-2007, 01:04 PM
Write a 5 page paper on why you want go to Africa and how safe it is to volunteer there. Prepare some Powerpoint slides, too. Announce a family meeting on Saturday night and do a presentation.

i'm pretty sure that should get their attention lol

Fee
12-06-2007, 01:11 PM
Larouge, go be a big brother. Seriously, if you are as smart as this thread makes you appear, there is a young boy out there who could use you as a role model. Go volunteer at the nearest Boys Club, I'm sure they would love to have you, even for a few hours a week, running the homework center or something.

Happy Holidays. :)

PimpMyGame
12-06-2007, 01:41 PM
Larouge,
I say that you need to respect your parents and listen to them. You are 16 and they are the ones supporting you. When you are 18, legally an adult, and paying your own bills, you can do whatever you want. Africa will still be there, and still need your help.

I agree with those who say that there is plenty of need for your services in New York. If that doesn't appeal to you for some reason, perhaps you can spend a summer in a clinic in the deep South or the Appalachian region. I sure the health problems, poverty, and oppression there will be good preparation for you.

I admire your desire to serve, but please be realistic and spend some time at home where you are a little bit safer.

I second this advice. Your parents are right, but (as I can testify) when you're 16 you see things differently. You really need to concentrate on studies and you will find that doors will open for you.

Good luck and don't give up your fighting spirit.

eodera
12-16-2007, 07:36 PM
Dr. Liz Odera (PTR Professional and HeadPro) invites you to join the Friends of Sadili network. Sadili Oval is a not-for-profit community sports centre, which supports grassroots and performance training in tennis, soccer, rugby, basketball, swimming, athletics, gym, chess; formal education to poor children; environment and community leadership, coaches' training for job placement; HIV-AIDS education; girl child empowerment, networking and business training support for local CBOs which will lead to job creation in Kibera (Africa’s largest slum) and Manyatta (Kisumu) and prepare them for integration with the rest of society. By joining this group, you will be able to help make a difference.
Would you like to help us win for the 3000 children of Sadili Oval's unique programme on sport and life skills in Africa?
Volunteer
• You can volunteer your time to run a sports camp during the months of April, August and December. Each camp lasts two weeks. We provide accommodation and meals during this time
• In our US-Africa Exchange programme, where we receive coaches from the USA every summer to participate on our tennis camps as well as learn about our African culture, music and community leadership workshops. We also carry our flag to the USA, where we have our students also train, compete and d some community work. Students may the, jointly come up with ideas for the future, such as establishing a community library. Linking schools and colleges will be of great value, although it would also need some fundraising support.
• You can also volunteer to offer a short course to our community coaches, who have come through our programme, and are seeking opportunities to qualify as tennis instructors.

To find out more about Sadili Oval and our programmes, please go to <http://www.sadili.com/>
and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iv8oqgLB90

Or contact Dr. Liz Odera on malezi@wananchi.com

If you cannot travel to Kenya, you can still donate online today using a safe and secure site, and you will also find our latest update on where the funding so far has been spent. Its easy, just click onto

http://www.globalgiving.com/1665



:)

zapvor
12-16-2007, 10:18 PM
its true that you can get crazy disease stuff from africa...most of which are unknown/uncurable. however you are surrounded by doctors, so they know the risks. i thinkit boils down to parent-child nurture. they cant risk it man. you are like the prized possession. africa is teh ONE experience of a lifetime. and you are the ONE experiecne of a lifetime for your parents.....

LarougeNY
12-27-2007, 08:15 PM
Dr. Liz Odera (PTR Professional and HeadPro) invites you to join the Friends of Sadili network. Sadili Oval is a not-for-profit community sports centre, which supports grassroots and performance training in tennis, soccer, rugby, basketball, swimming, athletics, gym, chess; formal education to poor children; environment and community leadership, coaches' training for job placement; HIV-AIDS education; girl child empowerment, networking and business training support for local CBOs which will lead to job creation in Kibera (Africa’s largest slum) and Manyatta (Kisumu) and prepare them for integration with the rest of society. By joining this group, you will be able to help make a difference.
Would you like to help us win for the 3000 children of Sadili Oval's unique programme on sport and life skills in Africa?
Volunteer
• You can volunteer your time to run a sports camp during the months of April, August and December. Each camp lasts two weeks. We provide accommodation and meals during this time
• In our US-Africa Exchange programme, where we receive coaches from the USA every summer to participate on our tennis camps as well as learn about our African culture, music and community leadership workshops. We also carry our flag to the USA, where we have our students also train, compete and d some community work. Students may the, jointly come up with ideas for the future, such as establishing a community library. Linking schools and colleges will be of great value, although it would also need some fundraising support.
• You can also volunteer to offer a short course to our community coaches, who have come through our programme, and are seeking opportunities to qualify as tennis instructors.

To find out more about Sadili Oval and our programmes, please go to <http://www.sadili.com/>
and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iv8oqgLB90

Or contact Dr. Liz Odera on malezi@wananchi.com

If you cannot travel to Kenya, you can still donate online today using a safe and secure site, and you will also find our latest update on where the funding so far has been spent. Its easy, just click onto

http://www.globalgiving.com/1665



:)

Thank you very much, this is a pretty interesting program.