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View Full Version : Buying a racket: question for NoBadMojo


crosscourt
12-14-2004, 06:17 AM
Very interested in your views on buying a racket. Something I am never sure about is whether I should play with a racket that helps my strengths or hides my weaknesses. I guess the answer is a bit of both, but where does the balance lie and does it depend on what sort of game I have?

cc

NoBadMojo
12-14-2004, 07:23 AM
yes, depending on you game and level, you usually buy something that enhances your strength but can support your weaknesses and then use that racquet to work on your weaknesses (and improve your strengths).....think roddick w. his pd+. the balance i cant help you with not knowing your game and is really subjective. but there are always tradeoffs. example: if you have good groundtrokes (strength) but wish to improve your serve or volley (weaknesses)....very likely this frame you found that serves better for you is going to negate your strength, and your game may actually become less effective. the key is to find something good at everything unless you wish to be one dimensional. then stick with that frame and learn how to get the most out of it. in short, dont expect the racquet to make you a better player..it's all about the racquet operator...

mary fierce
12-14-2004, 12:22 PM
I've never used a racquet that could really hide my weaknesses; can you think of an example of this working for you?

ty slothrop
12-14-2004, 12:35 PM
let's think of a hypothetical player and name him, say, andy roddick. let's say that his strokes are kind of clumsy and tend to break down over long points. let's also say that he stands back about 20 feet behind the baseline even on hardcourts because he lacks the natural hand/eye coordination to pick the ball early and hit it clean. but for good measure, give him a serve that is sometimes timed in excess of 150 miles per hour.

he might want a racket like babolat's pure drive plus. it could enhance his already booming serve to such an extent that he could end points without really having to rally or end points from the net. and for those times when bad fortune forces him to actually rally, its trampoline tendencies could allow him to dictate play even from far behind the baseline.

I've never used a racquet that could really hide my weaknesses; can you think of an example of this working for you?

mary fierce
12-14-2004, 01:27 PM
I'm not buying the example. Who out there with poor hand/eye coordination (read as "impaired control") thinks that a racquet with a built-in trampoline (read as "impaired control") would help his game? You seem to be suggesting that someone forced to stand well back from the baseline is better off with a woofer. Since poor Andy would be FURTHER FROM HIS TARGET (the area close to the opposite baseline), wouldn't a racquet with better control serve is purpose? If you're "clumsy" and your strokes
"tend to break down," an overpowered cannon is likely to amplify the problem, not hide it.

NoBadMojo
12-14-2004, 01:47 PM
but take that very same bat, the pd+ out of his hand and give him something more control oriented and watch him lose because his serve wont be as effective nor would his forehand, which goes to my point that most players should buy a frame that best suits their strengths (weapons in the case of an advanced player)....so if he uses the control oriented frame and volleys much better and is more consistent, he no longer has his weapons. it's all about the trade offs. the pure drive + is an anomoly though because of its ridiculous power. trhere are plenty of frames out there that are good at everything <good all courters frames>..i think people should pick something like that

ty slothrop
12-14-2004, 01:49 PM
well, as I pointed out, the PD+ CAN hide flaws in your game by allowing one to serve so hard that fewer balls come back, and thus your flaws do not show up as much. and secondly, if your strokes aren't developed, it's gonna be much easier to stay in rallies or hope to end them sooner by choosing a racket that is primarily for loading up and blasting the ball rather than hitting targets.

if I'm playing someone whose strokes aren't developed as mine, i know that i choose to play precise shots. but against someone with better strokes, i need more of blaster racket to obscure the fact i can't hit the sweetspot with as much authority. that's why i normally play with a rok, but keep a 300g handy for players who can hang with me or even push me around off the ground

i think that's what crosscourt and nobad are referring to

mary fierce
12-14-2004, 02:50 PM
OK, OK semanticsman. I'm not sure that when crosscourt spoke of a racquet that would hide his weaknesses, he meant one that would prevent him from ever having to hit the shot that is the weakness. A racquet that conceals a shotgun would serve this purpose too.

Redflea
12-14-2004, 06:10 PM
If you're not very strong, a more powerful racquet may compensate for your lack of strength, though it can cost you in terms of control.

If your eye-hand coordination is poor, a racquet w/a larger head/sweetspot may compensate for your tendency to hit off-center, but it can cost you in maneuverability.

So you can run, but you can't hide, and there's no free lunch on the tennis court.

As for the original question...I always purchase racquets that fit my strengths and preferred game, and at least don't exacerbate my weaknesses. I then take lessons to improve. :-)

crosscourt
12-15-2004, 03:02 AM
Thank you all for your views. I am not thinking of changing, having just gone back to a Prestige Classic from the LM Prestige, a move motivated by elbow comfort. But it did make me think that as my serve isn't as good as the rest of my strokes, and as I serve better with the LM, but do everything else better with the PC, I ought to work out what I need most, not what I like most (all other things being equal). I ought to be able to measure the diffeence between the rackets in terms of results, but at the moment I only get to play in the seemingly constant rain so it's difficult to make a comparison.

cc