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Newby
12-14-2004, 10:56 PM
Has anyone played with a St. Vincent Prostaff? Is there really a significant difference in feel?

PrestigeClassic
12-14-2004, 11:55 PM
Yesterday I had an interesting outing with a near mint St. Vincent. Lately I've been playing so infrequently (once or twice a week for the last year and then some), but just a few hours ago, I played the best I have in a very long time. The racket was not demanding at all, and I only had one total mis-hit in a few sets. But I've heard from some that the Pro Staff Original/6.0 85 really accentuates your ups and downs. Anyway, on Thursday if I play anywhere near like I did yesterday, I'll make this my new stick and I'll start to sell off the various other sticks that I have collected in my search for a new game day stick. I played that good with this St. Vincent. I had a China 6.0 85 before and with it I was hitting really bad returns. It had no feel compared to the St. Vincent. Yesterday I quickly got into a groove and was hitting my returns and other hard shots as good as I was when 1.) I was playing five days a week; 2.) when I was a few years younger than I am now; and 3.) when I was playing with a bigger racket.

Honestly, it wasn't quite as good as I had been expecting according to other posters' talk of the famous St. Vincent. But it was still great. I forget now about the newer 6.0 85 I had, but in the hoop I think the St. Vincent plays a little stiffer.

Also, my St. Vincent is only about 12.5 ounces strung, so it should be even easier to swing than the newer 6.0 85! That's right in the middle of that "11.6 - 12.3 ounce unstrung" spec sticker that is attached to the earlier Pro Staff rackets. By comparison, my River Grove, Illinois, Pro Staff is 13.0 ounces strung and it doesn't even have a bumper guard. At any rate, that original Original is much harder to play with. It dumps a lot of balls into the net and just doesn't feel as sweet as the St. Vincent.

Anyway, to get back to your question, the feel difference is apparent on hard-hit shots like overheads, first serves, and returns or other aggressive groundstrokes where you just may flatten out on the ball. It serves a great serve down the T in either court, as well as a great slice serve in the deuce court, and flat out-wide serve in the ad court (I'm a righty). The control is there allowing you to hit the serve in the corner or closer to the net for a greater angle. Finally, I am able to hopefully keep the returner having to guess where I'm going to serve because I can now hit a good serve in more than one direction.

I didn't find this St. Vincent overly stiff where it makes it hard to hit back balls that were hit deep to your side of the net. So no worries on setting up to hit either a backhand slice or a topspin shot on that ball that hits close to your baseline. I find flexible rackets are great for shots like that and low shots. This St. Vincent is versatile enough to play like a flexible racket if a situation like that calls for it. It's really great, definately much better than a nCode HyperCarbon body destroyer.

Sorry if this article doesn't make much sense, I'm in a state of delirium. You really have to experience it for yourself, and just try to think of words that can describe your experience. There's so many other shots like all the different kinds of volleys that I didn't even mention, but where the St. Vincent also really shines. As long as you hit out in front, racket head up, you'll be taken care of when hitting that high backhand volley into the open court, covering a down-the-line pass attempt, hitting a half-volley, etc. It just feels so solid.

yip kok kuin
12-15-2004, 05:26 AM
I have one. the one without head protector. nothing great actually, I prefer the max 200g anytime. Its sweetspot is way way too small.

ty slothrop
12-15-2004, 05:54 AM
saint vincents swing and feel MUCH differently than the china made 6.0, no question about it. that being said, if you like one you can adjust easily in one hitting session

Marius_Hancu
12-15-2004, 11:37 AM
Yesterday I had an interesting outing with a near mint St. Vincent.

How does one know it's a St. Vincent?
What's written instead of "Made in China"?

ty slothrop
12-15-2004, 12:01 PM
most of the prostaff 85's that DON'T say 6.0 are saint vincent, i believe. anyone feel free to correct me

Newby
12-15-2004, 03:06 PM
Thanks for the info PrestigeClassic. As for how you can tell it's a st. vincent...the China ones say Wilson Prostaff 6.0 on the side while the St. Vincent ones say MIDSIZE. Also, the St. Vincent ones have a butt cap code that ends with the letter Q i believe.

raftermania
12-15-2004, 05:14 PM
Why did they call it the St. Vincent anyways? Who is this guy, like a tennis god or something? If so, one of the racquets he made fell in the right hands for 7 wimbys!

Swan Song
12-15-2004, 05:20 PM
Why did they call it the St. Vincent anyways? Who is this guy, like a tennis god or something? If so, one of the racquets he made fell in the right hands for 7 wimbys!

It's called the "St. Vincent" because Wilson had a factory in the islands of St. Vincent and the Grenadines from circa. 1984-1991. St. Vincent and the Grenadines is nearby Barbados and other Caribbean islands.

The Wilson Ultra, Ultra 2, Jack Kramer Staff, Sting, Ceramic, Ultra FPK, Profile, and some other Wilson frames that you do not see right now were manufactured at the St. Vincent factory.

In 1991, Wilson moved their factory to Taiwan, and in the mid to late 1990s, they moved their factory to China, which is being used right now.

tennisnoob
12-16-2004, 01:46 AM
most of the prostaff 85's that DON'T say 6.0 are saint vincent, i believe. anyone feel free to correct me

The only sure way to tell whether its a st vincent stick would be the red primer underneath that black paint.

raftermania
12-16-2004, 02:02 AM
Ah thanks for the enlightenment swan song. I would never have guessed that.

drakulie
12-16-2004, 03:57 AM
St. Vincents definitely have a different feel to them than the later China/Taiwan models.

They play much stiffer and solid. I feel that the China/Taiwan models feel a little "tinny" or "hollow". Not sure if that makes sense to anyone? They definitely do no feel as solid.

tennisnoob
12-16-2004, 06:37 PM
St. Vincents definitely have a different feel to them than the later China/Taiwan models.

They play much stiffer and solid. I feel that the China/Taiwan models feel a little "tinny" or "hollow". Not sure if that makes sense to anyone? They definitely do no feel as solid.

I would say the Taiwan version feels the closest to the st vincent model, i once tried it and its pretty solid.

tandayu
12-16-2004, 09:00 PM
How to differentiate St Vincent with Chicago version?
How many different variety/version (graphic, bumper guard, etc.) of St Vincent?
Is the Taiwan version has same mold with St Vincent?
Is the taiwan versiob has same mold with China version?

PrestigeClassic
12-16-2004, 09:31 PM
1.) St. Vincent is the only one with either red primer and butt cap code ending in Q, (or X??). All River Grove, Illinois, models are without bumpers. River Grove models are also anywhere from very glossy (kind of like Taiwan) to just a little more glossy than St. Vincent. St. Vincent have very matte paint.
2.) For the most part, three. No. 1 comes without a bumper (Edberg). No. 2 is the same except it comes with a bumper. No. 3 has a cosmetic like that of the current 6.0 (Sampras). Before the most recent cosmetic, there were stickers inside the throat and MIDSIZE is seen on both sides, not just one side like later St. Vincent.
3.) Yes. Same mold, same grommets.
4.) I don't know. But the grommets won't interchange so easily. A bigger detail is the Taiwan's use of unidirectional graphite. All others were of braided graphite. Also, perhaps the necks are of different widths. China rackets seem to have wider necks (parallel with the string bed). I'd guess that's for more stability.

tandayu
12-18-2004, 10:33 AM
Thank you prestige classic,

I have not weight the rackets, but I want to know if the bumper guard's weight made a difference on the racket's balance point.

PrestigeClassic
12-18-2004, 12:28 PM
I have no idea. Edberg preferred the early St. Vincent without the bumper guard, so there must be something a little unique about the early St. Vincent. If they are more head-light, a couple layers of head tape will weigh I think almost the same as a bumper guard.