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View Full Version : What does it take to use a six one tour


Masterblaster
01-31-2008, 05:33 AM
Hello all at talk tennis!

Is it really worth considering a six one tour? the only professional who uses a 90sq inch head I can think of is fed, whilst all other pros use at least a 95sq inch head. If only the best in the world uses a 90, what makes it an ideal choice for non professional players?

I work at a sports store so I borrowed a k six one tour from my shop. I'm not allowed to damage it in anyway (we don't do demos), so i've used it just to hit against the wall and a couple of casual rallies with friends. I'm a beginner but i did enjoy the solid, elbow friendly, feel it gave. I've enjoyed it over a good handful of other racquets i've tried, racquets that would probably be more appropriate for my skill level. Comparing it to a n six one team i'm using, i don't feel any sacrifice in power or a reduction in the size of the sweet spot.

My NTRP would be around 3, so it's nowhere near what tenniswarehouse recommends for using a six one tour, yet still i am allured to it. My question is, is it even remotely ideal to purchase one at my level? Or would playing with one significantly effect the quality of my game. (infact i already feel using a 95 six one team is not helping with my consistency)

leonardtay
01-31-2008, 05:36 AM
Hello all at talk tennis!

Is it really worth considering a six one tour? the only professional who uses a 90sq inch head I can think of is fed, whilst all other pros use at least a 95sq inch head. If only the best in the world uses a 90, what makes it an ideal choice for non professional players?

I work at a sports store so I borrowed a k six one tour from my shop. I'm not allowed to damage it in anyway (we don't do demos), so i've used it just to hit against the wall and a couple of casual rallies with friends. I'm a beginner but i did enjoy the solid, elbow friendly, feel it gave. I've enjoyed it over a good handful of other racquets i've tried, racquets that would probably be more appropriate for my skill level. Comparing it to a n six one team i'm using, i don't feel any sacrifice in power or a reduction in the size of the sweet spot.

My NTRP would be around 3, so it's nowhere near what tenniswarehouse recommends for using a six one tour, yet still i am allured to it. My question is, is it even remotely ideal to purchase one at my level? Or would playing with one significantly effect the quality of my game. (infact i already feel using a 95 six one team is not helping with my consistency)

Well, if you like how it felt in casual rallies, it means that you could handle it well when fresh. The K90s weight starts to affect you later on in competitive matches so you need to make sure you have enough endurance to use it to its full potential for the whole of your matches. If you are having a problem with consistency, you might want to hold off on the K90 for now. Or buy an old one and use it for some time to see if you really can handle the racquet day in day out match after match.

grass_hopper
01-31-2008, 05:41 AM
if you have the fast foot work to be waiting for the ball and power to hit the lines on most shots then you should be tempted by it. there are lots of recreational players who like small head size racquets, even old ones from head.
this racquet is extremely demanding of player's ability to produce just like a race car, joy rides are only fun for a short while.

fuzz nation
01-31-2008, 06:49 AM
Since neither of us are making a living out on tour, I think that the reasonable response to your inquiry over what it takes to use that racquet is a) a little spare cash to give one a home, and b) a general affinity for the thing.

I agree that it would make sense to pick one up second hand - they're around these days - and get to know it for a while. It's not like you're buying a house here and you had a rather good experience with your test drive from the sounds of it. After you get some time to really settle in with the new Wilson, you'll have a much better idea of how well it fits your game.

As long as your racquet (or any of your other gear) isn't a major distraction for you, then you can get on with the business of improving your game. Keep that in mind as you try out this bat or any others in your career on the courts.

Anton
01-31-2008, 07:04 AM
Hello all at talk tennis!

Is it really worth considering a six one tour? the only professional who uses a 90sq inch head I can think of is fed, whilst all other pros use at least a 95sq inch head. If only the best in the world uses a 90, what makes it an ideal choice for non professional players?

I work at a sports store so I borrowed a k six one tour from my shop. I'm not allowed to damage it in anyway (we don't do demos), so i've used it just to hit against the wall and a couple of casual rallies with friends. I'm a beginner but i did enjoy the solid, elbow friendly, feel it gave. I've enjoyed it over a good handful of other racquets i've tried, racquets that would probably be more appropriate for my skill level. Comparing it to a n six one team i'm using, i don't feel any sacrifice in power or a reduction in the size of the sweet spot.

My NTRP would be around 3, so it's nowhere near what tenniswarehouse recommends for using a six one tour, yet still i am allured to it. My question is, is it even remotely ideal to purchase one at my level? Or would playing with one significantly effect the quality of my game. (infact i already feel using a 95 six one team is not helping with my consistency)

If you ENJOY playing with it the most, then all else, including winning, metters little.

josef
01-31-2008, 07:15 AM
i'm a 3.5-4.0 getting back into it and i bought the 90 used on these forums and i don't regret it. granted, i do not use it for matches as i miss hit too much and it just takes too much effort with that weight and headsize (for me). but for just practicing hitting it is really fun to use as it has such a great feel and just plows though the ball.. if you got the extra cash, go for it... but have a backup racquet too.. lol.

Alafter
01-31-2008, 07:23 AM
There are no rules on this. By all means, if you like it that much, do get it. If it is your first racquet, then congratulations :)

With some training, you will be able to use it. In fact, that goes for any racquet.

I am by no mean a supporter of MID racquets btw. From my view, I dont get anything out of it, and I most certainly get everything I need out of OS racquets that are more or less in the same class as Nblade OS. Control, power, touch--for me, OS doesnt have any of these in lesser amounts than other head sizes.

Take it this way, your first racquet probably wont be right for you--you wont really know until you get more and more serious about the game, over time of course. By then, you'll be ready to try something new. Or, by chance, it might just be a lucky match...even better!

Just appreciate its slick beauty and enjoy it k!

Doc Hollidae
01-31-2008, 08:14 AM
Play with whatever racket feels the best and gives you the most confidence. It might be a K90 for a 2.5 female or a Speedport Platinum for a 5.5 male.

However with that said, make sure the racket won't hinder improvement or be a burden in any aspect in your game. Due the K90's small headsize and low power, it does require good technique in order to generate depth and pace. Also the K90 will be a lot less forgiving than other rackets. Someone who can't hit the sweet spot consistently might really struggle with the K90, because it won't forgive you for a mishit like a midplus or oversize potentially can.

sunflowerhx
01-31-2008, 08:48 AM
IMHO, the Tour 90 is not for 99% of recreation players.

Using an advance racket like that will more than likely HINDER your progress.

The best thing I ever did for my game was to ditch my set of PS Tour 90s.
By using a less demanding racket, I am far more consistent and able to hit with more spin & power. Now my main rackets are a HPS 6.0 and a Donnay Pro One.

Yesterday, after almost a year I tested a K90 at my local club.
Man I forgot how heavy these things were. I am glad now that I ditched those frames.

Most people who buy the Tour 90s are deluding themselves.
Especially when you have guys on the other side of the net sending over bombs with their Babolats and Poly string jobs.

lukarf
01-31-2008, 08:56 AM
I like it, like its feel and how it gets through the air. It's maneuvrable, solid, stable and has tons of control. Best racquet I've tried so far and there's no ranking that can say the opposite, tough I'm a 3.5. As long as you enjoy it, play with it and be happy for it. :D

SFrazeur
01-31-2008, 08:56 AM
IMHO, the Tour 90 is not for 99% of recreation players.

Using an advance racket like that will more than likely HINDER your progress.

The best thing I ever did for my game was to ditch my set of PS Tour 90s.
By using a less demanding racket, I am far more consistent and able to hit with more spin & power. Now my main rackets are a HPS 6.0 and a Donnay Pro One.

Yesterday, after almost a year I tested a K90 at my local club.
Man I forgot how heavy these things were. I am glad now that I ditched those frames.

Most people who buy the Tour 90s are deluding themselves.
Especially when you have guys on the other side of the net sending over bombs with their Babolats and Poly string jobs.

Yes, I have been on both sides of that particular net. I used the n90 for about 8 months, with several inches of lead. I later went to the RDS 001 Mid, which is what I refer to as the mortal of the two racquets. I still wanted more margin for error as I embraced more of the topspin style of today. I tried the RDS 002 TOUR, but I have finally settled on the Pure Drive Team Plus, with Pro Hurricane Tour. I have found the best fit yet.

I like this side of the net; I see no reason to make things hard on myself. I would rather play my best.

-SF

Alafter
01-31-2008, 09:10 AM
Most people who buy the Tour 90s are deluding themselves.
Especially when you have guys on the other side of the net sending over bombs with their Babolats and Poly string jobs.

That's a little too harsh. Deluding themselves might not necessary be the case. More like...eh, consciously refusing to give in to their awareness that the racquet might be too much for them.

Ultra2HolyGrail
01-31-2008, 10:23 AM
I tried the RDS 002 TOUR, but I have finally settled on the Pure Drive Team Plus, with Pro Hurricane Tour. I have found the best fit yet.


How do you find that set up for arm safety? Also have you tried alu? Any comparison which is more arm friendly?

shatoon
01-31-2008, 10:31 AM
People have said it already....play with what you enjoy most.

You can split peeps on these forums in two camps: the ones that care about improvement and the competitive element and the ones that want to enjoy themselves and do whatever feels good. The point is for some improvement is secondary to fun whislt to others fun is secondary to improvement

If you get your enjoyment from just starting down at those beautiful red and black lines and 'knowing' that Federer uses one, and shanking the ball alittle too often yet producing stunning shots on occasion then buy it.

If you feel that it is indeed, hindering your progress and this is what matters to you above all other things, then buy something else.

It's impossible to tell what you will play with best, or find the best balance between improvement and fun. Just try a few rackets out and go with what makes you feel like going to play tennis.

SFrazeur
01-31-2008, 10:48 AM
How do you find that set up for arm safety? Also have you tried alu? Any comparison which is more arm friendly?

Generally speaking of course a poly, even a co-poly in a pure drive is not a setup that is terribly cautious; however, I find it very comfortable. Surprisingly comfortable. For me a racquet is uncomfortable when it vibrates heavily, the RDS 002 TOUR wore me out a bit because of it's vibrations. I have no problem with the PD stiffness, but that's me. Even with a Pure Drive being about as stiff as a long island ice in a Nun. So I am very comfortable with it. I have found I like it at a lower tension than my signature currently states. When I probably restring it somewhere near 52, unless it's really hot then I'll probably keep it. at 55. I haven't tried Alu. I tend not to experiment with string much. I tried PHT in the Pure Drive Roddick+ and I really liked on the second try so I kept it when I picked up a couple Pure Drive Teams +. I tried Poly Plasma Pure 16 in the PDR+, but it felt "weak," I just could not warm up to it. When I tried PHT in the PDR+ again I strung it at 55 whereas I originally strung it at 57 and it felt way too stiff. That made a big difference. But to temper that comment I was only using the PDR+ for about four weeks at that point; I had come off softer flexible Yonex racquet, like the RDS 002 Tour, RDS 001 Mid, RDX 500 mid. I have a history of using stiff racquets though; I used the Wilson 5.3 Hyper Hammer MP for a good while, the stiffness was around 75. I use to string it to max @ 63 with Wilson Stamina. I am one of the few people around here that really liked the feel of hyper carbon.

-SF

Doc Hollidae
01-31-2008, 10:53 AM
Generally speaking of course a poly, even a co-poly in a pure drive is not a setup that is terribly cautious; however, I find it very comfortable. Surprisingly comfortable. For me a racquet is uncomfortable when it vibrates heavily, the RDS 002 TOUR wore me out a bit because of it's vibrations. I have no problem with the PD stiffness, but that's me. Even with a Pure Drive being about as stiff as a long island ice in a Nun. So I am very comfortable with it. I have found I like it at a lower tension than my signature currently states. When I probably restring it somewhere near 52, unless it's really hot then I'll probably keep it. at 55. I haven't tried Alu. I tend not to experiment with string much. I tried PHT in the Pure Drive Roddick+ and I really liked on the second try so I kept it when I picked up a couple Pure Drive Teams +. I tried Poly Plasma Pure 16 in the PDR+, but it felt "weak," I just could not warm up to it. When I tried PHT in the PDR+ again I strung it at 55 whereas I originally strung it at 57 and it felt way too stiff. That made a big difference. But to temper that comment I was only using the PDR+ for about four weeks at that point; I had come off softer flexible Yonex racquet, like the RDS 002 Tour, RDS 001 Mid, RDX 500 mid. I have a history of using stiff racquets though; I used the Wilson 5.3 Hyper Hammer MP for a good while, the stiffness was around 75. I use to string it to max @ 63 with Wilson Stamina. I am one of the few people around here that really liked the feel of hyper carbon.

-SF

My dubs partner plays with the Team Plus and found that he likes it at ~52 lbs as well. He said he feels like it combats the stiffness of the Pure Drive and he's never strung lower than 60 before getting the PDT+. I always give him a good teasing for the low tension since I play at 64 lbs.

SFrazeur
01-31-2008, 11:00 AM
My dubs partner plays with the Team Plus and found that he likes it at ~52 lbs as well. He said he feels like it combats the stiffness of the Pure Drive and he's never strung lower than 60 before getting the PDT+. I always give him a good teasing for the low tension since I play at 64 lbs.

Yeah, with me feeling it was too stiff strung higher was less about the stiff feel of the racquet and more that the string bed response felt too stiff, I like the feel of some give. I do not mind at all the racquet feeling like a board, but for me the strings need some give.

-SF

Ultra2HolyGrail
01-31-2008, 11:13 AM
Just be careful SFrazeur. And warm up those shoulder muscles. I also used a stiff frame mostly. Profile 95-4.3 hyper hammer. I thought i was invincible with the 4.3 but a sudden shoulder tear serving when not warmed up quickly woke me up. I think the super light weight of that frame plus super stiffness-more than a pure drive- is what did me in, along with the fact i did not warm up properly.. Just a thought but consider a multi-gut-cross, should play exactly the same with added comfort.

nickb
01-31-2008, 11:19 AM
I played the six-one 90's for 2 years...after using 98+ rackets I would never ever go back. They are very damanding and you will need to be in excellent shape if you want to play a 3 set match with one. I have never seen a K90 in a tournament and only know 1 decent player around here that uses a K90 (he is around 900ATP). Stick with a MP if you really want to improve.

Nick

SFrazeur
01-31-2008, 11:30 AM
Just be careful SFrazeur. And warm up those shoulder muscles. I also used a stiff frame mostly. Profile 95-4.3 hyper hammer. I thought i was invincible with the 4.3 but a sudden shoulder tear serving when not warmed up quickly woke me up. I think the super light weight of that frame plus super stiffness-more than a pure drive- is what did me in, along with the fact i did not warm up properly.. Just a thought but consider a multi-gut-cross, should play exactly the same with added comfort.

Concern is appreciated. A proper warm up is important with any racquet. The Profile 95, that's one of the grandfather's and "mother" of stiff wide body racquets. I think the stiffness was in the 80s. I have considered hybridizing with gut, as an experiment, but the humidity and heat variances in my area are very strong. Also I tend to go two months without re-stringing; the gut could be fine but the poly would be dead by then.

-SF

Ultra2HolyGrail
01-31-2008, 11:35 AM
I played the six-one 90's for 2 years...after using 98+ rackets I would never ever go back. They are very damanding and you will need to be in excellent shape if you want to play a 3 set match with one. I have never seen a K90 in a tournament and only know 1 decent player around here that uses a K90 (he is around 900ATP). Stick with a MP if you really want to improve.

Nick

The n90 was the most fatiging frame i ever used... I've never played with a frame that made me tired in the third like the n90. And that includes a 85 with lead. The k90 i hear might be better but i'm once bitten twice shy with 90in wilsons.

Ultra2HolyGrail
01-31-2008, 11:51 AM
The Profile 95, that's one of the grandfather's and "mother" of stiff wide body racquets. I think the stiffness was in the 80s


It was the pure drive of it's day :) High quality, very head light. Your elbow would be feeling it after a match if not used to it that's for sure.

Masterblaster
02-01-2008, 06:29 AM
I use a two handed backhand.......why do all people with a two handed backhand use MP or OS racquets and only onehanders choose a mid?

quest01
02-01-2008, 07:24 AM
IMHO, the Tour 90 is not for 99% of recreation players.

Using an advance racket like that will more than likely HINDER your progress.

The best thing I ever did for my game was to ditch my set of PS Tour 90s.
By using a less demanding racket, I am far more consistent and able to hit with more spin & power. Now my main rackets are a HPS 6.0 and a Donnay Pro One.

Yesterday, after almost a year I tested a K90 at my local club.
Man I forgot how heavy these things were. I am glad now that I ditched those frames.

Most people who buy the Tour 90s are deluding themselves.
Especially when you have guys on the other side of the net sending over bombs with their Babolats and Poly string jobs.

If only you could convince the other people in this room who use midsize rackets.

poinconeru
02-01-2008, 07:50 AM
SFrazeur,
Where do you have the lead (and how much) on your PDs? I like the weight of the PDRs but hate the dampened cortex feel. my wife has a PD that I experiment with from time to time--when I add a leather grip it comes to 12.2 or so (typically the weight I like best), but it doesn't feel right to me.

movdqa
02-01-2008, 08:15 AM
I love the way that the K90 feels and hits. It just requires good footwork and early preparation. It can hit all sorts of interesting shots that aren't as easy to hit with other racquets and it's stability is nice for the arm.

That said, the specs on the K-Blade look pretty interesting for us in Redondo-land (or formerly there).

Alafter
02-01-2008, 08:20 AM
Now that I think about it, I kinda do want to buy a K90 US version just for keepsake...it's a good looking racquet.

SFrazeur
02-01-2008, 09:00 AM
SFrazeur,
Where do you have the lead (and how much) on your PDs? I like the weight of the PDRs but hate the dampened cortex feel. my wife has a PD that I experiment with from time to time--when I add a leather grip it comes to 12.2 or so (typically the weight I like best), but it doesn't feel right to me.

The four lead strips are 5 and 1/4 inches. Located starting at the 7th cross string, ending just above the 17th cross string.

The gripsize is 4-1/4. I use TW brand leather (22mm x 1300mm x 1.5mm), which extends up 8 3/8 inches; measured from the endcap up.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r179/SFrazeur/TT/100_0347.jpg http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r179/SFrazeur/TT/100_0348.jpg


-SF

poinconeru
02-01-2008, 02:41 PM
Thanks for the pics. How do you think it compares to a PDR? And what's the balance on there now?

drakulie
02-01-2008, 02:47 PM
What does it take to use a K90??? >>>

Approximately 200 dollars.

RestockingTues
02-01-2008, 02:59 PM
I like it, like its feel and how it gets through the air. It's maneuvrable, solid, stable and has tons of control. Best racquet I've tried so far and there's no ranking that can say the opposite, tough I'm a 3.5. As long as you enjoy it, play with it and be happy for it. :D

I demoed it once and it was actually easier to swing then my unleaded fxp Prestige mp :confused: It was everything that lukarf raved about it... I'm a 4.0 at best

RoddickistheMan
02-01-2008, 03:19 PM
Ask drak about this.

rabidcow
02-01-2008, 04:49 PM
If you have to ask you can't use it, kind of like buying luxury items

BreakPoint
02-01-2008, 11:47 PM
Most people who buy the Tour 90s are deluding themselves.
Especially when you have guys on the other side of the net sending over bombs with their Babolats and Poly string jobs.
Except if you're Federer and you're playing against Roddick, of course. ;)

quest01
02-02-2008, 11:08 AM
The one thing with a mid is that you must accept the fact that you will shank the ball more using a mid then a midplus frame. That is just something you will have to deal with and thats just the way it is. If you can accept that fact and wont get frustrated over it you will be fine with a midsize frame.

Christian78
02-02-2008, 02:43 PM
I was around NTRP 3 when I bought this racket. If you are serious about your tennis and want to work hard and tinker with your technique I would recommend
this rackes. It will give you instant feedback on when your right and when your wrong and you can use this to get some insights in stroke mechanics and movement.

Be prepared that it will take a long time before you will be proficient with this racket. I play 3 to 4 times a week and it took me a good 6 months before I could consistenly hit the sweetspot in rallies. The benefit is a much better understanding, now I understand every step in the forehand technique and can hit it with great phase and spin whitout any effort.

If a would have continued playing with my light OS to this day I think I would have won more but been a lesser tennisplayer, just because there is'nt the same urge to develop with an OS.

andymac1
02-02-2008, 03:09 PM
I'd guess myself to be a 4.0 player, and I love my ksix, but I know that I have to concentrate more than I usually do, but it pays off.

andymac1
02-02-2008, 03:10 PM
What does it take to use a K90??? >>>

Approximately 200 dollars.

Lol. Indeed, but it's worth it.

BounceHitBounceHit
02-02-2008, 05:12 PM
If your goal is to have fun and you have fun with the K90, go for it! However I can't recommend it (as much as I personally love it!) to a 3.0 player whose goal is to improve. :) CC