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kumat63
02-01-2008, 02:40 PM
I was a little puzzled by the review of the Head Microgel Prestige you published recently. I've played several versions of the Prestige along with several of the Yonex "players" frames and a couple in the Wilson 6.1 line. What confused me is that Chris praised the racquet highly and said it blows the doors of the Flexpoint and LM versions. Yet it rated lower numbers wise than any other Prestige you've ever tested. What's up with that? What should we make of that?

It seemed like Granville in particular was really down on the racquet for reasons that were odd: he liked the Fischer Pro One which is even more flexy and low powered than the MG Prestige, but downgraded the Prestige for not having enough power. Several other play testers complained about the lack of power. It's not power stick for seniors okay? It isn't supposed to be a powerful frame. Granville claims in other reviews to like soft feeling and control oriented racquets, which the MG Prestige certainly is, but then complains that it is soft feeling and low powered? Huh? He also suggested that it lacks the power of a "heritage Prestige". Almost everyone I know who's hit with the original models finds the MG a stiffer and more powerful racquet. So it seemed like an odd review.

When you rate a racquet for "power" and "control" are these absolute ratings, or comparisons within the category the frame is positioned in? Might it not be better to make these comparisons relative to the other racquets in the category? I'd also like to see in the review how a racquet like the Prestige compares to a Wilson K-factor, a Yonex RQis, Fischer Pro #1, etc...

It would make for a more helpful read.

TW Staff
02-01-2008, 04:50 PM
Thanks for the feedback.

I can only speak to my own experiences with the racquets and I did not find the forgiveness in the feel or the response of this version like I do in the Prestige Classics we have. I get more ball speed off the stringbed with the Prestige Classic 600. I preferred the feel of the MicroGEL Prestige Mid compared the Flexpoint and Liquidmetal versions, but did not say it blew their doors off. For me, it felt more solid. The MicroGEL Prestige is a nice stick and I’m sure many players will love it.

When Granville talks of the racquet's power, he is talking in terms of like racquets - so, other player’s racquets.

We score power on how much we can get out of the stick - how much power we find in our game while using it.

Power is somewhat subjective to the player. For instance, a heavy racquet in the hands of an advanced player will generate more power than a lightweight so called "power" racquet. Weight will always win out in the power war - more so than headsize, stiffness or beam width etc. The advantage of the bigger lighter racquets is that they are more forgiving and easier to handle - larger sweetspot and more maneuverable.

Chris, TW

bluegrasser
02-02-2008, 03:17 AM
Thanks for the feedback.

I can only speak to my own experiences with the racquets and I did not find the forgiveness in the feel or the response of this version like I do in the Prestige Classics we have. I get more ball speed off the stringbed with the Prestige Classic 600. I preferred the feel of the MicroGEL Prestige Mid compared the Flexpoint and Liquidmetal versions, but did not say it blew their doors off. For me, it felt more solid. The MicroGEL Prestige is a nice stick and Iím sure many players will love it.

When Granville talks of the racquet's power, he is talking in terms of like racquets - so, other playerís racquets.

We score power on how much we can get out of the stick - how much power we find in our game while using it.

Power is somewhat subjective to the player. For instance, a heavy racquet in the hands of an advanced player will generate more power than a lightweight so called "power" racquet. Weight will always win out in the power war - more so than headsize, stiffness or beam width etc. The advantage of the bigger lighter racquets is that they are more forgiving and easier to handle - larger sweetspot and more maneuverable.

Chris, TW

Ditto + I agree with Granville and others that it doesn't have the plow through of the LM or FXP, which surprised me. especially with the op Pro..

kumat63
02-02-2008, 12:04 PM
Thanks for the feedback.

I can only speak to my own experiences with the racquets and I did not find the forgiveness in the feel or the response of this version like I do in the Prestige Classics we have. I get more ball speed off the stringbed with the Prestige Classic 600. I preferred the feel of the MicroGEL Prestige Mid compared the Flexpoint and Liquidmetal versions, but did not say it blew their doors off. For me, it felt more solid. The MicroGEL Prestige is a nice stick and I’m sure many players will love it.

When Granville talks of the racquet's power, he is talking in terms of like racquets - so, other player’s racquets.

We score power on how much we can get out of the stick - how much power we find in our game while using it.

Power is somewhat subjective to the player. For instance, a heavy racquet in the hands of an advanced player will generate more power than a lightweight so called "power" racquet. Weight will always win out in the power war - more so than headsize, stiffness or beam width etc. The advantage of the bigger lighter racquets is that they are more forgiving and easier to handle - larger sweetspot and more maneuverable.

Chris, TW

I should have clarified that I was talking about the Prestige MG Midplus, not the mid... and you did say concerning the midplus MG Prestige that "I thought this one blew the doors off the Flexpoint and Liquidmetal versions from the baseline". Which was not reflected in your overall numerical ratings at all. Both FP and LM scored higher than the MG...

On the power thing: the weight of the MG is right in line with the previous Prestige midpluses, so that doesn't seem a factor. Most of the PT630/280 afficionados on this board seem to agree that while the MG might not be as sweet feeling, it is a higher powered (and slightly heavier) stick than the PT630/280 which would be the "heritage Prestige" in the midplus line. So Granville's comments still seem odd (and they occur in the midplus review frequently). You also give the MG midplus Prestige a higher power rating than any other Prestige, 5 points higher than the Fischer Pro #1 (which didn't get dinged for being "low powered") and one point higher than Granville's beloved K factor 6.1 in power (75 vs. 74) so again the complaints about the MG Prestige MP's lack of power in the text don't match up with your number ratings for the MG MP Prestige, which is confusing.

Reviews are subjective, I'm just trying to point out that what you say in the text isn't reflected in your numerical ratings, so you might want to look at that for further reviews, for clarity's sake...

Mara
02-03-2008, 01:08 PM
I have just bought two Microgel Prestige Mid. Compared to my other racquets, Head Prestige classic 600, they are slightly more head light (about 1 centimeter). Yet, when I swing them they still seem heavier - higher swingweight. My question is this: can a racquet that is more head light, but that otherwise has the same weight and lenght as another racquet, still have a higher swingweight?

Gimmick
02-04-2008, 09:13 AM
Yes if the same amount of weight is distributed differently you can achieve a lighter balance and heavier swingweight.

Mara
02-04-2008, 11:52 AM
Explain "distributed differently"?

BreakPoint
02-04-2008, 01:27 PM
Explain "distributed differently"?
If you had a racquet where 50% of its weight is 12 inches above its balance point and 50% of its weight 12 inches below its balance point, it would have the same balance point as a racquet that has 50% of its weight only 1 inch above and 50% of its weight only 1 inch below its balance point. So although the balance spec of these two racquets are identical, the weight distributions are completely different and the racquet will swing and play completely differently and they will also have different swingweights. Thus, balance is not the same thing as weight distribution and you cannot just go by the balance spec of a racquet to determine how the racquet will feel when you swing it. The balance point just tells you the point at which half of the racquet's weight is above and half is below that point, but it tells you nothing about how that weight is distributed along the length of the frame above and below that balance point.

Hope that helps.

BobFL
02-04-2008, 06:37 PM
I have just bought two Microgel Prestige Mid. Compared to my other racquets, Head Prestige classic 600, they are slightly more head light (about 1 centimeter). Yet, when I swing them they still seem heavier - higher swingweight. My question is this: can a racquet that is more head light, but that otherwise has the same weight and lenght as another racquet, still have a higher swingweight?

Yes, it is possible.
If you have two racquets with the same static weight and balance, one can have considerably higher SW if it has more weight in lower hoop and throat while the other one has more weight in lower hoop and handle...

Regards,

Bob

Mara
02-05-2008, 08:10 AM
Thanks, excellent answer. Now I do understand.