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Power Game
12-19-2004, 06:17 PM
Wonder Wedge Review
Me: College level player, 2 handed SW backhand, SW forehand, continental 1st serve, eastern backhand 2nd serve.
Big Power Game on both sides and with the serve

Racquet 1: Head LM prestige mid strung with Volkl Power Fibre 18 mains and poly crosses @ 45, no grip, just wonder wedge under a wilson pro overgrip.

Racquet 2: Head LM prestige mid strung with Volkl Power Fibre 18 mains and poly crosses @ 45. Head softac grip (with cushion ripped off) and a wilson pro overgrip.

First of all let me than Tim Tennis for allowing me to review the wonder wedge...

OK, for installation you need to take off your original grip, put the wedge on and tape it, then overgrip it. Pretty easy. It feels REALLY wierd when you first hold it. Takes some time to get used to, so I spent 10 minutes swinging it around in room to get a feel for it.

On the tennis court.... feels very comfortable in a SW grip and swing nicely. It definetly adds more stability to the racquet, it can't twist in your hand at all. When it comes to rallying I found it took some extra effort to change grips quickly. I found that I shanked the ball alot more than usual with the wonder wedge. Not sure why, but it may be due a slight change in weight and swingpath or something like that. So, for groundstrokes, the WW adds alot of stability at the expense of grip changing and speed and shanking (the shanking part could just be me though). Another thing, you have to hit forehands from the same side of the racquet, which may be problematic for some people. Also, while returning, I usually like to spin the racquet around in my hands until the server tosses the ball, with the WW I had to keep my hands in one position.
This WW thing is excellent on kick serves with a eastern backhand grip. For continental serves and flat serves it really doesn't help. But for the kick serves, it feels much more comfortable, for those of you that hit serves with a backhand grip you know how awkward the grip feels at first. The WW eliminates that and gives you much more stability on the serve. Did I get 3 feet more kick? No, but I did get a more stable hold on the racquet and therefore a little more consistency.
On a side note, I found that my other racquet had more power, possibly because the WW added some weight to #1 and made it more Head light....

To wrap things up....If you want more stability with groundstrokes or If you want to learn the eastern backhand grip (for serves or 1-handed backhands) then the WW is for you. If you value your idiosyncrasies and have a continetal serve then don't get the WW. Remember that the WW will feel really wierd at first and will take some time getting used to. I would reccomend the WW mainly to those trying to learn the eastern or SW backhand grip or SW forehand grip to give this a try. If you are an established player then don't expect this WW to do miracles for you (15 mph more, or 3 feet more kick), but try it out for yourself and feel what true stability really is.

Feel free to ask any questions you have....
Power Game

Tim Tennis
12-21-2004, 04:17 AM
Power Game,
First of all let me thank Tim Tennis for allowing me to review the wonder wedge...

First let me thank you for strapping the WW on your racquet and taking the time to test it. I love it when high level players try out the WW. Their feedback not only helps me understand how they react to the changed shape but also helps others decide if they would like to try it.

Your comments are greatly valued and appreciated.

If you value your idiosyncrasies and have a continental serve then don't get the WW.

I think this is the only statement you made that really surprised me. The vast majority of testimonials I receive absolutely love the WW for finding and using the Continental grip on their serve and backhands. That was a shocker. :shock: Oh well, it is your review, and I greatly appreciate you doing it.

Below is a link to the Continental grip page.

http://www.tennisgeometrics.com/Continental_Te.htm

Thanks, Power Game

andfor
12-21-2004, 07:09 AM
How many times did power game demo the WW? From the sound of his review I get the feeling he only went to the court one time with it. I could be wrong. Just curious.

Tim Tennis
12-21-2004, 09:29 AM
Hi Andfor,

In defense of power game, heck at least he gave it a try. It is a lot to ask a 5.5, 6.0 player to start tinkering with their game. From his comments I could tell he spent and hour or two with the WW.

Power Game, I would really love to know in more detail just exactly what happened with the Continental grip on the serve? Did you draw the ball into the net, which is what I suspect happened? Call me or E-mail me. That would probably be a lot easier then exchanging a bunch of posts.

To the Wonder Wedge faithful, cult members (no it is not a cult), believers, take it easy on these guys. Remember, the first few times you hit with the WW you had to work some things out too before you had it fully incorporated in all aspects of your game. I do have to admit, I love your passion for the WW and greatly appreciate your support.

You got to love the game.
http://www.tennisgeometrics.com/Wonder_Wedge_W/IMAG0001.JPG

Power Game
12-21-2004, 10:47 AM
Hi guys,
I just got done with my final exams, so I gave the WW 2.5 hours. It's still on my racquet though and I'm going to give it at least 5-6 hours more before I decide if I will keep it on.

I'll post a follow up review once I am done. Maybe early january.

Tim tennis,
I'll email you tonight....
But with the WW on continental serves I had no problems whatsoever getting the ball in or getting good pace, just that I didn't notice much difference from a regular grip.

But the greatest part about the WW is definetly the eastern backhand grip, by far.....

Power Game

The Pusher Terminator
12-22-2004, 05:58 AM
39 year old serve and volleyer. Level 5.0.

Grips: (please note these have changed since switching to the ww)

serve: continental for slices and spin serves,eastern flat Canonballs for down the T. Eatern backhand for kicks. I pretty much use all the grips for different serves as this is my strongest stroke.

Forehand: eastern for return of serves and most ground strokes, continental for slices.

Backhand: two fisted for topsin.....one hand for slices,touch shots and volleys...continental grip.

Volleys..continental and only a one handed backhand

REVIEW

The wonderwedge is easy enough to install, but you need to customize it to fit your hand...this could take quite some time. The guidelines that come with the product are just that...a guideline. I cut my wedge down 2 full inches, I believe that the instructions recommended that I only cut it down 1/2 inch for my size hand.

The first thing that I noticed is that my serve improved tremendously. This is my best stroke and quite frankly I have not improved on it for many years...but the wedge simply gave me a heck of a lot more power. I increased by at least 7 mph. The continental grip was much firmer as the index finger rests on the ww's bevel...almost like a "shelf " was created just for your index finger to rest on. The spins and kicks were truly incredible. I believe this has to do with the angle the wedge makes your racquet hit the ball and how much stronger your grip now is. Remembr the ww elevates the grip ...so your angles will change. In fact, the wedge simply gives you more power on every shot...which is why people may dislike it at first....the power is hard to control. However, my coach (Chris Mayotte, former #85 in the world), explained power is never a problem ...you just need to figure out a way to control that power by changing your stroke production.

I was serving tremendously but I was hitting the ball out on every groundstroke. Even my volleys suffered as they were all sailing out as well. The power was just too hard to control. Therefore I decided to use the ww on serves and my standard grip for return of serve games. I was basically winning my service games on aces and missed returns...my volleys were terrible. Everything sailed out.....I was confused on which grip I should stick with . My coach , explained that with my serve improvement I would have to stick with the ww as I was getting so many free points and I would just have to learn how to volley with the ww. I stuck with it and learned to caress the ball on my volleys...barely touching it. I actually tried to underhit the ball. The results were magnificent...my volleys have never been better!

I reported to Tim that I had been winning matches using the ww on service games and the standard grip on return games. Tim was not happy and pushed me to switch completely to the WW. He said that I was "cheating".

Chris mayotte has been trying to get me to switch to the semi-western on my groundstrokes. I never could quite hit the stroke with a standard grip. I tried it with the ww and was actually able to hit this shot, not that well but at least I was able to hit it.

Chris explained "Not all wrists are created equal" some people hit a shot better with a semi-western while others hit better with an eastern or continental. he had me try the continental....I literally hit the ball to the roof. I started to laugh but Chris made me stick with it. I decided to simply aim lower...at the foot of the net. To my amazement I started to hit beautiful powerful shots all over the court....I have been painting the lines! Chris had me change the mechanics of my stroke....before hitting a shot he has my elbow pointing to the back of the court aimed high... and then uncoiling with a wristy flick at the end......its hard to explain but it worked. By changing my grip and my stroke, I was now able to control all of that power.

With the wonder wedge I am now able to hit topspin shots using a continetal grip! I believe the reason is that the ww changes the angle at which the face of the racquet hits the ball. For example ...an eastern forehand with the WW is really like a continental with a standard grip. A semi western with the WW is more like an eastern with a standard grip and so on . This is only a theory...but one thing is for sure....this will not feel comfortable to you the first time you try it. You really need to stick with this for quite some time before getting the hang of it. The only stroke that worked immediately for me was on my serve...evrything else has taken dedication and hard work...but it has paid off big time! I have completely overhauled my game.Thank you WW and Chris Mayotte!

Tim Tennis
12-22-2004, 10:40 AM
Pusher Terminator,

Thanks for the interesting review. I must say I don't know anyone who has a powerful topspin forehand using the Continental grip. The mechanics you described make me think of someone who uses the SW or the W grip.

Also from your review it is obvious that you have spent hours and hours working on your game and incorporating the WW into it. That is determination. Most players, when the reach the 5.0 level are pretty happy with their game and they should be, but you show an unusual determination to improve way beyond that. You must truly love the game and enjoy competing.

I reported to Tim that I had been winning matches using the ww on service games and the standard grip on return games. Tim was not happy and pushed me to switch completely to the WW. He said that I was "cheating". Well I don't know if it is legal or not but I think it would be very confusing.

PT thanks for taking the time to do the review. I think it is a great lesson. If you want to get to the next level, you have to be willing to put in the time, practice, experiment, find out what works for you.

Tim Tennis
12-22-2004, 10:54 AM
Power Game,

Tim tennis,
I'll email you tonight....
But with the WW on continental serves I had no problems whatsoever getting the ball in or getting good pace, just that I didn't notice much difference from a regular grip.


PG, that explains it. Don't worry about E-mailing me. Enjoy your holidays.

From this statement I thought you were having some terrible problems with the Continental grip which I just did not understand. I read too much into it.
If you value your idiosyncrasies and have a continental serve then don't get the WW.

Also thanks for continuing to practice and experiment with the WW. You might really get outside the box and be creative with some swing paths, grips, contact points, just see how much power and action you can get on the ball with the WW. You just might come up with a new weapon that could greatly improve your game.

You got to love it.

The Pusher Terminator
12-22-2004, 03:54 PM
Thanks for the interesting review. I must say I don't know anyone who has a powerful topspin forehand using the Continental grip. The mechanics you described make me think of someone who uses the SW or the W grip

Tim, I am surprised. The wonder wedge is a new device and you are trying to crack into the conservative establishment. I agree that it is a very strange concept to hit top spin with a contenental grip...but here were some other strange concepts that the tennis establishment held:

1. Establishment: serve motion should be "up together down together".....I think Roddick has proven that theory wrong.

2.Establishment: The tighter your strings the more power...ummm...wrong again guys!

3. Establishment; The proper stance is the closed stance.....I think every player since Borg has proven that wrong.

4.Establishment: The standard grip is far superior to the wonder wedge....wrong again! :D [/quote]

The Pusher Terminator
12-22-2004, 03:54 PM
Thanks for the interesting review. I must say I don't know anyone who has a powerful topspin forehand using the Continental grip. The mechanics you described make me think of someone who uses the SW or the W grip

Tim, I am surprised. The wonder wedge is a new device and you are trying to crack into the conservative establishment. I agree that it is a very strange concept to hit top spin with a contenental grip. but don't forget your website claims to make a player hit topspin while using a wedge and an eastern grip...thats because an eastern grip with a wedge is more like a continental with a standard. Besides here were some other strange concepts that the tennis establishment held:

1. Establishment: serve motion should be "down together up together".....I think Roddick has proven that theory wrong.

2.Establishment: The tighter your strings the more power...ummm...wrong again guys!

3. Establishment; The proper stance is the closed stance.....I think every player since Borg has proven that wrong.

4.Establishment: The standard grip is far superior to the wonder wedge....wrong again! :D

kreative
12-27-2004, 11:00 AM
NTRP 3.5 player, aggressive counter-puncher working on all court game.

Grips: Full western grip forehand, 2 handed backhand, serves, volleys and slices range from continental to eastern backhand.

Racquet: Babolat Pure Drive Standard, strung with Kirschbaum Competition at 56 lbs.

Installation: Installing the Wonder Wedge was easy. I placed it on the grip and just feeling where my index finger would rest on the bevel of the WW and just cut the excess off the bottom.

Feeling the Grips: I immediately felt at home w/ the eastern backhand grip. Continental felt bulky to me, but it's getting better the more I use it. For my western forehand, the wedge felt better pointed out rather than rested in the palm of my hand.

Playing:

Groundstrokes: With the WW, I immediately felt the power boost on the forehand side. I was sailing balls long constantly, and also noticed that my racquet face was slightly more open than usual on contact. Closing the racquet face a bit, and putting more spin on the ball gave me some inspiring results. I was hitting deep w/ alot of pace and the balls were pushing my opponent back. Several had mentioned that my balls "had so much kick on the bounce", making it tough for them to return. I did feel like I lost some control thou, so I'll have to keep working on harnessing all this extra pop I'm getting. Perhaps adjusting my string tension would help also. I didn't feel much of an improvement on the 2 handed backhand. The grips did feel awkward and bulky at first, since my right hand is continental and left hand eastern (I'm a righty). It still doesn't feel as comfortable as the regular grip, but I'm hitting the shot pretty much the same with or without the WW. The backhand slice was a different story however. I was hitting them w/ an eastern backhand grip, which felt really comfortable to me w/ the WW, and the slices were staying low, had bite, and I could hit short angles, or deep down the line at will. Definitely a huge improvement here.

Volleys: Again, the continetal grip felt bulky to me, and for me, the WW was made for the eastern backhand grip, so my volleys for the most part were hit w/ this grip. Solid contact on backhand volleys, and I felt more comfortable sticking them deep to either corner rather than hitting short touch volleys. Forehand volleys, which I mostly hit w/ the eastern backhand grip also, had more underspin, and I felt more comfortable hitting touch volleys or wide to the service line. Trying to hit deep, penetrating volleys usually ended up in a weak floating shot. I was able to hit solid volleys w/ the continental grip on the forehand side, even thou it felt a little clumsy, it worked.

Serves: Definitely an area where I need help if I continued to use the WW. Serving w/ an eastern backhand grip, I had way too much spin on the ball and lacked drive on the ball. Some serves would be weak into the net, and others that landed in sat up for the opponent to crush. I'm working on it. I had better success w/ the continental grip here hitting spin serves, still not much pace, but kind of like my regular second serve pace. Interestingly, for flat serves, my hand kind of found it's way to the eastern forehand grip, or somewhere close to that. I got really nice pace on my flat serves with this "new" serving grip, and I'm still trying to analyze the swingpaths on my serves to see the different contact angles.

Last thoughts: I think I need more time w/ the WW to get used to it, especially w/ the continental grips, and on the serves. Do I see a benefit? Yes, it locks your hand into the correct grip, and the bevel of the WW makes it a great reference point. Shots hit hard at you won't cause the racquet to torque in your hand since your grip of the handle is much more stable.

Tim Tennis
12-27-2004, 01:15 PM
Kreative,

That was a great review. Thanks for taking the time to do it. I think many 3.5 and 4.0 players would have similar results the first few times they played with the WW.
Continental felt bulky to me, but it's getting better the more I use it. Only comment I might have is are you sure you had your hand all the way over to the Continental grip, usually the Continental grips fits very securely and comfortably in the hand? The only grip that might feel bulky at first should be the Eastern forehand.

I hope you continue to practice and experiment with the WW. If you do, I think you will find many ways that it will improve your game that you are not even aware of yet.

Master the new points of leverage and traction the Wonder Wedge provides and greatly improve you game

Great job, thanks so much. :D

AndrewD
12-27-2004, 11:41 PM
Out of curiousity Tim, is the WW available in Australia or is it only a mail order product ?

Tim Tennis
12-28-2004, 04:59 AM
Andrew,

Out of curiousity Tim, is the WW available in Australia or is it only a mail order product ?

Thanks for the inquiry. If you E-mail me, I can give you the name, phone number and E-mail address of an individual who should be able to supply you with some. I guess it would still be mail order but at least it would save you the $7.00 export fee if you order it from my site. Plus it should get there a lot quicker. Export orders usually take 7 to 10 days.

If you can find Peter D. McCraw, the womens high performance development coach, he might be willing to part with a couple, he has two dozen of them.

You got to love the game.

eagle
12-28-2004, 06:21 AM
Hi,

The biggest benefit more than anything else I found with the ww is stability. The added surface area made for a more secure grip.

I've got it on both of my racquets. Definitely a keeper.

Thanks,
eagle

Tim Tennis
12-28-2004, 08:03 AM
Eagle,

Thanks so much. You have got to grip it, to be able to rip it.

Ed (Tim Tennis)