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soyizgood
02-18-2008, 07:33 PM
Okay, I've decided to come up with this thread for various reasons.

* I recently started listening to jazz more (jazz funk, 80s, oldies jazz, smooth jazz, etc.)
* It's hard to find names and titles to jazz tunes if you only know the sound
* Introduce other artists and groups to other people

My collection of jazz music is quite small, but I have tunes from the following artists with favorites listed:

70s to now:
Sade (Smooth Operator, Your Love is King, Nothing Can Come Between Us, Kiss of Life, Paradise)
Shakatak (Nightbirds, Easier Said Than Done, B1tch to the Boys)
Herb Alpert (Rise, Route 101, Spanish Flea)
Hiroshima (One Wish, Revelation)
David Sanborn (Chicago Song, Slam)
Kenny G
Ronnie Laws (Always There, Night Breeze, Saturday Evening)
Crusaders (Street Life)
Bobby Caldwell (What You Won't Do For Love)

Way back:
Etta James (At Last, Sunday Kind of Love)
Ella Fitzgerald
Count Basie (Take the A-Train)
Louis Armstrong
Lena Horne (Ain't Misbehavin', Stormy Weather)
Peggy Lee (I Get Ideas)

There's two 80s/90s smooth jazz tunes I can't get out of my head but I don't know who performed them or the title. ARGH! They get occasional airplay to this day too. Hopefully we can help each other and learn a few things at the same time. Feel free to join in.

Z-Man
02-18-2008, 08:11 PM
I'm a bit more of a purist and don't get into "Smooth Jazz", although I can see the jazz in progressive rock, fusion, and bluegrass. Toss the Kenny G and pick up Miles Davis, Kind of Blue. It's the Darkside of the Moon of jazz albums. Bag's Groove is another classic. You also can't go wrong with Wes Montgomery, Jimmy Smith, Kenny Burrell, and Modern Jazz Quartet. Look for Smokin' at the Half Note, or any of the albums Jimmy Smith and Wes Montgomery did together. If you want to get "out there", pick up some John Coltrane or look for a Herbie Mann album called "Memphis Underground". Lastly, my personal favorite, Chuck Mangione--Feels So Good.

katastrof
02-18-2008, 08:14 PM
I've been an active "Jazz Freak" for the last year, at least. I couldn't yet get out of the 50s & 60s, so I don't know the recent trends, bands ..etc too much. Also, I'm a little annoyed by anyhing with the label "smooth", as I enjoy the wilder side of this music. Favorites so far: John Coltrane, Art Blakey, McCoy, Dave Brubeck Quartet (the recent album -London Flat, London Sharp- is amazing), Sonny Rollins, Archie Shepp, Monk... I know I'm just listing the legends of the genre, but it's like that for me so far.

It is an excellent idea to share ideas, suggestions, ...etc.

To conclude:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pXWKwUYGKg

soyizgood
02-18-2008, 08:19 PM
Lastly, my personal favorite, Chuck Mangione--Feels So Good.

I have that tune at home. But it gets monotonous listening to it after a while.

Neets
02-19-2008, 03:20 AM
I've always loved jazz. I started playing saxophone when I was 10 (no, I'm not any good). I'm no good with classifying which types there are and what I like. I like most kinds, except: no Kenny G, please :p

bluegrasser
02-19-2008, 04:28 AM
I dig Jazz - more a fan of the old stuff - standards etc..

Dedans Penthouse
02-19-2008, 08:51 AM
Charlie "Bird" Parker
And Charlie Byrd (guitarist) while yer at it.

Louis Armstrong (God)

"Duke"
"Count"
Lionel Hampton
Billy Taylor
Oscar Peterson (smooooth)
Earl Garner (listen closely...you can hear him growling while playing)
Horace Silver (recommended: "The United States of Mind")

Other notables:
Stan Getz
Woodie Herman
Herbie Mann

The only time I listen to Kenny G. is when it's accompanied by:
"And now, your local forecast; accurate & dependable from THE WEATHER CHANNEL." :-)

bluegrasser
02-19-2008, 12:42 PM
Charlie "Bird" Parker
And Charlie Byrd (guitarist) while yer at it.

Louis Armstrong (God)

"Duke"
"Count"
Lionel Hampton
Billy Taylor
Oscar Peterson (smooooth)
Earl Garner (listen closely...you can hear him growling while playing)
Horace Silver (recommended: "The United States of Mind")

Other notables:
Stan Getz
Woodie Herman
Herbie Mann

The only time I listen to Kenny G. is when it's accompanied by:
"And now, your local forecast; accurate & dependable from THE WEATHER CHANNEL." :-)

Now you're talking.....

mmeyer1
02-19-2008, 12:51 PM
Yeah i don't dig on smooth jazz at all, I'm more into the bebop/hard bop and the fusion era shiet:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me7P9qqBgwI - Trane + Dolphy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkTEfrmqxws - Mingus
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4FAKRpUCYY - Classic Miles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00tzcnyDL68 - Fusion Miles

rasajadad
02-19-2008, 12:57 PM
Also check out:
Gato Barbieri- Caliente
Everything Crusaders
Older James Brown (with the JayBees)
Dexter Gordon
For newer:
Marcus Roberts

tennisfan_23
02-19-2008, 04:05 PM
Charlie Haden and Pat Metheny - Beyond the Missouri Sky


One of the best albums of all time. Highlights from the album include "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" and "Cinema Paradiso (Love Theme)"

lude popper
02-19-2008, 04:24 PM
Back at the Chicken Shack

Joe Average
02-19-2008, 05:53 PM
I own a good collection of jazz LPs, remember them? LPs I mean. While in college, and while visiting my folks in NYC, I'd make trips to the record stores in the Times Square area for my classmates, before that place was turned into some form of Disney World. Anyway, my tastes are more classical. I think of Ornette Coleman and Free Jazz when I hear the term "modern jazz." Anyway ...

Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, the beboppers including Parker (I own the Dial Sessions on LP), Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Clifford Brown, Charles Mingus, Eric Dolphy, Thelonius Monk ...

I'll listen to some guys who are still alive (yes, Sonny's still alive) ... Marcus Roberts, John Zorn, Abdullah Ibrahim ("Water From An Ancient Well" the best!), World Saxophone Quartet. But the old guys ... were the best. And the best decade for jazz was the 1950s. Bop and swing were still around, modern was emerging, cool, West Coast ... great decade. Wished I was there.

The_Dark_Knight
02-19-2008, 06:59 PM
Miles Davis Quintet ftw.

A.J. Sim
02-20-2008, 08:03 AM
I like Keith Jarrett; just a great jazz pianist.

There are vids on youtube of an older Miles Davis playing a cover of "Time after Time". His version has a lot of depth and feeling even though in the concert you can tell that he's getting old and not quite where he used to be.

rleidle
02-20-2008, 09:11 AM
Since you like smooth/funk stuff so much, you should be listening to THE smooth album:

Grover Washington Jr. - Mister Magic

Another record that might appeal to your David Sandborn tastes:

Weather Report - Heavy Weather

Not really jazz, but it would fall in line with your tastes, try listening to some Tower of Power records!

As far as modern, straight ahead, jazz goes, I LOVE Chris Potter. He does rub a lot of people the wrong way so you may not feel the same way. I would suggest either one of his last couple of albums: Underground or Follow the Thin Red Line: Live at the Village Vanguard.

ZoomUltraflight
02-20-2008, 12:35 PM
Yeah, finally a thread my style! i'm a sax player so most of my choices are going to be sax players (but i don't discriminate against other instrumentalists). I would say to all of you to listen to some michael brecker because he was possibly one of, if not, the greatest tenor player. His style is probably more funk/rock but he has all the abilities and can solo in any stye you can imagine--each time leaving you breathless. James Carter is a monster player, but he goes a more 'avant garde' route, while still being able to outplay most of the cats who play a more striaght ahead style. I am not trying to say that he is better than all of the other pros or anything, because I don't want to start a 'who is better' feud, but all I am saying is this cat can play :). I also love the Mingus Big Band--check 'em out on youtube, better yet I will give you the link to the first half a great song with Seamus Blake being the tenor man:http://youtube.com/watch?v=BJhh-HdEZhY

Klatu Verata Necktie
02-20-2008, 01:05 PM
The legends of the 50's and 60's have been immortalized by spectacular music and critical acclaim, but there are plenty of contemporary musicians that are worthy of attention.

A few of my favorite contemporary players and composers include:

James Carter
Joe Lovano
Brad Mehldau
Dave Holland
Chris Potter
Dave Douglas
Bill Frisell
Kurt Rosenwinkel
Paul Motian

Joe Average
02-20-2008, 01:25 PM
It's funny how no one has mentioned Wynton. And I don't want to disparage the young guys. Most of the people mentioned I like. They're terrific. Paul Motian, Dave Holland, Charlie Haden, throw in Geri Allen. A dozen years ago, I caught Ms. Allen one night at the Knitting Factory in NYC, and the next night heard Ricky Ford. One of the best musical weeks of my life. But except for Sonny Rollins, the giants of jazz are gone. And jazz's rich history is on recordings. A friend of mine, a bunch of years ago, handed me a cassette of acetate recordings. They included one of Charlie Parker playing TENOR sax in a hotel room in Chicago. Fabulous! What a find! I think it later came out in an album. And there's an apocryphal story of how Phil Schapp in NYC was doing a Charlie Parker marathon on his radio show (WKCR). This was a bunch of years ago. He had gone for like 48 hours, and, wondering at 3:30 a.m. whether he should continue and if anyone was listening, asked the audience, if there was one, if he should continue? Within seconds Charlie Mingus called to encourage him. Art Blakey, or someone similar, called seconds after that. Thus began the Charlie Parker revival.

lonestar
02-21-2008, 01:50 AM
The legends of the 50's and 60's have been immortalized by spectacular music and critical acclaim, but there are plenty of contemporary musicians that are worthy of attention.

A few of my favorite contemporary players and composers include:

James Carter
Joe Lovano
Brad Mehldau
Dave Holland
Chris Potter
Dave Douglas
Bill Frisell
Kurt Rosenwinkel
Paul Motian


Some very nice picks Klatu. I would like to mention some more contemporary players/bands:

E.S.T. (Esbjörn Svensson Trio)
Tord Gustavsen Trio (young Norwegian pianist and composer)
Joshua Redman
Christian McBride
Medeski Martin & Wood
Nik Bärtsch Trio (young Swiss pianist and composer)
John Scofield
Wynton Marsalis
Erik Truffaz
etc.

I am also a huge fan of the original Blue Note catalogue from the 50's and 60's. Plenty of great records from Herbie Hancock, Grant Green, Hank Mobley, Lee Morgan, Jimmy Smith, Horace Silver, Wayne Shorter, Lou Donaldson, Blue Mitchell, and many others.

chroix
02-22-2008, 10:44 AM
Love the blue note stuff as well. I've got to throw out the impulse! label as well. I've yet to hear one of their recordings that I have not loved. Dexter Gordon's One Flight Up is a top fiver for me.


For new musicians I've got to stick with my New Orleans ppeople

chroix
02-22-2008, 10:45 AM
Love the blue note stuff as well. I've got to throw out the impulse! label as well. I've yet to hear one of their recordings that I have not loved. Dexter Gordon's One Flight Up is a top fiver for me.

New musicians Nick Payton and Josh Redman are among the best I've heard.

soyizgood
02-23-2008, 12:53 PM
I made a music CD for my girlfriend's birthday. Here's the list:

http://hajiorg.game-host.org/images/marianna_bday.jpg

Phil
02-23-2008, 05:23 PM
Charlie "Bird" Parker
And Charlie Byrd (guitarist) while yer at it.

Louis Armstrong (God)

"Duke"
"Count"
Lionel Hampton
Billy Taylor
Oscar Peterson (smooooth)
Earl Garner (listen closely...you can hear him growling while playing)
Horace Silver (recommended: "The United States of Mind")

Other notables:
Stan Getz
Woodie Herman
Herbie Mann

The only time I listen to Kenny G. is when it's accompanied by:
"And now, your local forecast; accurate & dependable from THE WEATHER CHANNEL." :-)
Yeah, exactly. How anyone can label Kenny G.'s nauseating noodling as "Jazz" is beyond me...

Joe Average
02-23-2008, 06:42 PM
All this jazz …

Not exactly my deserted island list, but these are the albums I listen to, especially on lazy Sunday afternoons. This isn’t a greatest recordings list. Not even the greatest by artist. Just a few of my favorites. Some have been discontinued or reissued under another title. In no particular order …

Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus (Charles Mingus) – it’s got “Hora Decubitus,” one of the more swinging tunes of modern jazz

Stormy Weather (Charles Mingus) – Eric Dolphy with a powerful rendition of “Stormy Weather.” It also has a bit of jazz theater in the “Original Faubus Fables.” Orval Faubus was the governor of Arkansas who ordered the Arkansas National Guard to keep black kids out of Little Rock Central H.S.

Way Out West (Sonny Rollins) – trio with Ray Brown on bass and Shelly Manne on drums. Sonny has this way of turning the unjazziest tunes into bona fide jazz. He does it with “The Surrey With the Fringe on Top” on “Newk’s Time.” And he does the same here with “I’m An Old Cowhand” and “Wagon Wheels.”

The Beginning and the End (Clifford Brown) – this has Brownie’s last performance. It’s got a thrilling version of “Walkin’” and a near flawless rendition of “Donna Lee,” one of the more challenging tunes, I’m told, to play on trumpet.

John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman – arguably the greatest jazz recording ever. And Coltrane was a superb balladeer, harmonizing beautifully with Hartman.

The Great Paris Concert (Duke Ellington) – a fine recording with probably Ellington’s best line-up ever.

Last Date (Eric Dolphy) – I used to buy records from King Carol on 42nd Street. I made friends with this guy who worked there, who was probably from Jamaica. One day, I asked him to recommend something by Eric Dolphy. He replied “Mahn … Dole-FEE. If dat cat fahtid, it would be music!”

JATP: Bird & Pres Carnegie Hall 1949 – Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Roy Eldridge on the same stage.

Pure Monk (Thelonius Monk) – solo piano, and pretty damned pure.

The Köln Concert (Keith Jarrett) – I know, I know. But I don’t think I spent a minute in college when this wasn’t playing somewhere on campus.