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ktowntennis
03-22-2004, 05:11 PM
I am an out of shape 34 year old tennis player who desperately needs to improve my conditioning before I find myself unable to get around the court. I have played tennis for over fifteen years and would rate myself somewhere between a 4.5-5.0. I am about 5'9" and I hoover between 220-230 lbs. Is there anyone out there who could offer some specific advice on what types of exercises I could do to shed what is obviously a significant amount of weight? Please feel free to post any responses here.

butchrey
03-22-2004, 06:09 PM
Hi! Ktowntennis,

Start on a gradual program of brisk walking 30 mins 3x weekly. After 14 days, alternate jogging with brisk walking 30 mins 3x weekly. Then jog 30 mins 3x weekly.

Do gym workouts at least 2x weekly.

Eat intelligently.

No smoking and minimize alcoholic beverages.

Play tennis on a regular basis.

Butch

sinoslav
03-23-2004, 11:48 AM
Definitely combine aerobics and weight training! Start easy on both. I started weight training by going to the gym once a week and doing just three or four exercises (I had success with bench press, pulldown, shoulder press, and leg extensions). After a month, start gradually adding exercises. Go for long-term results, and don't get frustrated if you can only start off in small amounts. Find some kind of aerobic exercise you like -- running, swimming, biking -- and get into it gradually.

Regarding diet -- one thing I can highly recommend is to drink lots of water and to eliminate all other drinks from your diet. Water is healthier, and fills your stomach with zero-calorie liquid. Plus you need lots of hydration to get the maximum benefits from your aerobic and weight training exercise.

Good luck!!!

Kobble
03-23-2004, 08:56 PM
Doing squats would help tremendously by adding more muscle to your legs. The more muscle you add to your body the more calories you will burn each day. Squats will also build the strength you need to start and stop rapidly on the court. Swimming would be a good thing for building upper body tone and endurance. Fast walking would be great until you get your fitness level up. When you get your weight down I would recommend doing pull-ups and dips for complete upper body strength and muscle mass.

bcaz
03-23-2004, 11:30 PM
Run, but be patient and build up to it gradually; 3-4 times a week is plenty. Lift weights 3 times or at least 2 times per week. Eat/drink less -- not much less, maybe 300 calories a day less -- that's easy. Be patient -- give it a year, or even more. Don't be discouraged, you're still young, and you'll enjoy the results long before you reach your final goals. Do all this -- and it's easy if you're consistent, not too zealous, and careful to avoid injury and smart enough to heal injuries rather than push through them -- these are adjustments you can adhere to for life, not so austere or stringent that you feel you can't wait to get back to "normal," which face it, is fat and out of shape if you don't change.

I'm fifty. I weighed 203 in July 2002 (heel surgery December 2001) and got down to 171 around September 2003. I was actually about 166 around Chrstmas 2003. I'm now about 170-171, and I plan to stay that way. I eat well. I'm 5'11". I play lots of tennis. Good luck, man, and hang in there.

BC

Cypo
03-23-2004, 11:59 PM
Remember too that muscle weight more than fat so look to the mirror more than the scale see how it's going.

Cigo
03-24-2004, 02:01 AM
I have several friends who have lost considerable amounts of body fat, starting summer 2003. The most important "ingredient" in their success were the two hour walks done on a very regular basis, seemed like they were out every day. This, of cource, might not be possible considering tight schedules, but the greatest distances possible should be covered.
Combined with proper diet and a membership at a local gym has helped them tremendously. I have always thought that if one were to run a mile there would be a better body burning effect then just walking the mile in a relaxed(but determined) manner. Though according to them it is the distance that matters. I also think their determination deserves to be mentioned considering the complains I kept hearing, but they stuck with it and it worked.

orange223
03-24-2004, 10:13 AM
I bought a Total Gym ($250) www.TotalGym.com about 3 years ago and I keep it in my office at home. I do my toning workout at least 3 times a week before work in the morning. I jump rope or do the manual treadmill on other days. Light yoga stretches and Pilates help too. With a wife and 2 small children, I don't have time to join a gym. I don't do Atkins, but I watch my carb intake and only carb-up before a match. I drink at least a gallon of water a day. 41 y/o, 5'11" @ 185, 3.5'ish.

Ronaldo
03-24-2004, 11:05 AM
orange said it 1st, watch your carbs and eat as if you are a diabetic, the pounds will shed fast. Have a new problem, added protein drinks, started lifting weights and using a Total Gym and gained 10# while my bodyfat percentage has dropped, go figure.

jings
03-24-2004, 06:33 PM
Diet and exercise all vital, but I would also add targets. What is your main goal and what are you going to measure yourself by as you go. Let's face it, results of being fit are great, but getting there can be a slog at times. If you're running set yourself a target for more distance or better time, that sort of thing. If you're targetting to lose 40 lbs over 9 months say, or whatever, break the 9 months up into bits and work out what you are going to achieve in those smaller chunks. Maybe think about entering a short race in your area .... doesn't matter what you do but just having some weight to lose and an interdeterminate amount of time to do it isn't going to keep giving you that give up the rear that we all need every so often - or quite a lot in my case. Good luck and enjoy. If you're looking to change your diet I cannot recommend "Fit for Life" by Diamond more highly - healthy sensible eating.

lesko
03-25-2004, 12:57 AM
Tennis, tennis and more tennis! I've never lost weight by weightlifting but lost 20lbs playing tennis. You need to play singles 4-5 times a week with at least one 3 hour session. Do a lot of rallying without points or hit against a wall. Schedule two matches in one day. Work on your baseline retrieving game. Don't care about winning and avoid coming to the net. Try to make points as long as possible.