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View Full Version : Why are racquetball racquets so crazy and stupid


Belmonte13
03-02-2008, 02:57 PM
I've strung every E-Force i think (judgment, bedlam, launchpad, etc) and some crazy wilsons where the string goes down through the sides of the handle between the grip.....and sometimes when i'm trying to get enough light in the handle to see which tube is red and which is orange, i ask myself WHY!!!! Is there some techno guy out there that can give me a good explanation why racquetball sticks have to be so different.....i mean, prince (ektelon) keeps their O3 tech. consistent in these, and it's great......i'm sure there's more of you out there who get annoyed like me....please, comiserate!

YULitle
03-02-2008, 03:03 PM
I laughed so hard just at the title. So true.

Maybe it's a running joke in R&D at the plant.

"Look where I have the mains going THIS time!"
"Sweet, they're gonna have such a fit over this one!"
*high fives all around*

Babb
03-02-2008, 05:13 PM
^^^^
Hahaha! I know this a useless post, but that was great.

edit-- ah, it keeps getting better. I have a feeling that this is going to be one funny thread.

meowmix
03-02-2008, 05:16 PM
Think of it this way. A ping pong player would find stringing a tennis racket insane: YOU"VE GOT 18 BY 20 STRINGS THAT I'VE GOT TO STRING?!!! F OFF!!! "

kfactor/all/the/WAY!
03-02-2008, 06:13 PM
Think of it this way. A ping pong player would find stringing a tennis racket insane: YOU"VE GOT 18 BY 20 STRINGS THAT I'VE GOT TO STRING?!!! F OFF!!! "


isnt funny that there is a bag for ping pong paddles? imagine a super six pack for ping pong paddles! XD

Babb
03-02-2008, 06:17 PM
^^^^
Wouldn't that be like a lunch box or something? LOL.

YULitle
03-03-2008, 03:05 AM
Every time I see this thread I can't help but laugh. We need to keep it around just for good spirits. :D :D :D

hollywood9826
03-03-2008, 03:21 AM
isnt funny that there is a bag for ping pong paddles? imagine a super six pack for ping pong paddles! XD

Ask and you shall recieve. A wheely bag for pong :)

Wheelie Pong Bag (http://www.ping-pong.com/cgi-bin/shopper.cgi?preadd=action&key=YP660&reference=/cgi-bin/shopper.cgi%3Fsearch%3Daction%26keywords%3DYASAKA% 20and%20ttBag%26searchstart%3D0%26template%3DTempl ates/QueryMenu/ttbag.html)


And yes those Racquet ball paddles where the strings go down and loop around a piece inside the handle freak me out :)

YULitle
03-03-2008, 03:29 AM
^^^ What is that? a 100-pack? :D *slaps knee*

Belmonte13
03-03-2008, 05:12 AM
hahaha that's all good stuff. i'm just waiting for a racquet to come out that has a bunch of different colored tubes for the crosses and there's some ridiculous pattern to them as well

jazar
03-03-2008, 05:19 AM
raquetball is just a ******** form of squash

iplaybetter
03-03-2008, 07:04 AM
^^^ What is that? a 100-pack? :D *slaps knee*

at that point you have a small person in the bag producing new paddles

SW Stringer
03-03-2008, 11:21 AM
I've strung every E-Force i think (judgment, bedlam, launchpad, etc) and some crazy wilsons where the string goes down through the sides of the handle between the grip.....and sometimes when i'm trying to get enough light in the handle to see which tube is red and which is orange, i ask myself WHY!!!! Is there some techno guy out there that can give me a good explanation why racquetball sticks have to be so different.....i mean, prince (ektelon) keeps their O3 tech. consistent in these, and it's great......i'm sure there's more of you out there who get annoyed like me....please, comiserate!

It's in the rules of tennis that:
APPENDIX II
THE RACKET
a. The hitting surface, defined as the main area of the stringing pattern
bordered by the points of entry of the strings into the frame or points
of contact of the strings with the frame, whichever is the smaller, shall
be flat and consist of a pattern of crossed strings connected to a frame
and alternately interlaced or bonded where they cross. The stringing
pattern must be generally uniform and, in particular, not less dense in
the centre than in any other area.
The racket shall be designed and strung such that the playing characteristics
are identical on both faces. The racket shall be free of attached
objects, protrusions and devices other than those utilised
solely and specifically to limit or prevent wear and tear or vibration or,
for the frame only, to distribute weight. These objects, protrusions and
devices must be reasonable in size and placement for such purposes.

b.
The frame of the racket shall not exceed 29.0 inches (73.7 cm) in
overall length, including the handle. The frame of the racket shall not
exceed 12.5 inches (31.7 cm) in overall width. The hitting surface
shall not exceed 15.5 inches (39.4 cm) in overall length, and 11.5
inches (29.2 cm) in overall width.
c.

The frame, including the handle, and the strings, shall be free of any
device which makes it possible to change materially the shape of the
racket, or to change the weight distribution in the direction of the
longitudinal axis of the racket which would alter the swing moment of
inertia, or to change deliberately any physical property which may
affect the performance of the racket during the playing of a point. No
energy source that in any way changes or affects the playing characteristics
of a racket may be built into or attached to a racket.

The rules governing the racquet in racquetball:
Rule 2.4 RACQUET SPECIFICATIONS


(a) The racquet, including bumper guard and all solid parts of the handle, may not exceed 22 inches in length.


(b) The racquet frame may be any material judged safe.


(c) The racquet frame must include a cord that must be securely attached to the player's wrist.


(d) The string of the racquet must be gut, monofilament, nylon, graphite, plastic, metal, or a combination thereof, and must not mark or deface the ball.


(e) Using an illegal racquet will result in forfeiture of the game in progress or, if discovered between games, forfeiture of the preceding game. The penalty for playing with an otherwise legal racquet with a grip extending beyond the 22-inch limit if noted during the course of a game shall be a technical foul and a timeout to correct the problem. Subsequent violations will result in the loss of the game in process. If the challenged racquet is found to be within the 22-inch limit, then a timeout will be charged to the player who made the challenge.


The racquetball rules don't limit the size of the hitting surface nor the planarity of the stringbed. The only physical limit is the length (22") of the overall racquet. Longer strings make a more powerful racquet (all else being equal). Two manufacturers now have made some or all of the mainstrings full length (22") - E-Force(patented strings thru the handle) and Wilson. Most of the others have attempted to maximize the length of their mains.

And, yes the stringing patterns are sometimes . . . challenging, but then what do you call the Wilson T2000. Hey, maybe the guy that designed the T2000 went to work for E-Force! :cool:

mpenders
03-03-2008, 11:44 AM
[QUOTE=Belmonte13;2130242]...WHY!!!! Is there some techno guy out there that can give me a good explanation why racquetball sticks have to be so different.....QUOTE]

It's mostly about power. There is no such thing as thing as being too powerful when it comes to racquetball. As such, the theory is the longer the strings, the more powerfull the racquet. A rball frame is limited to 22 inches in length, so having the strings go thru/around the handle is one way to maximize the length of the mains.

Another issue regarding the design of tennis vs rball frames is the location of the sweet spot. Rball players have to contend with walls, and often do not have the room to make contact with the ball exactly in the center of the stringbed. It is common for better players to take full, offensive and powerful shots at balls that are only 6 inches (or less) from a side wall. Hitting in the center of the frame is just not an option in this situation.

Rball racquets are designed to have the sweet spot located further towards the head. This is one reason why rball frames are generally more teardrop shaped instead of round/oval like tennis frames. Also, you will see more cross strings closer to the head of the frame, to better support the mains from shearing due to the powerful hits that will occur at the top of frame. The "ridicuous patterns" (especially common with the Eforce racquets) are also used to help prevent shearing due to top-of-frame hits. I'll try to explain this (images might be necessary) if anyone's really interested.

YULitle
03-03-2008, 11:46 AM
I am. I want to learn. :D

mpenders
03-03-2008, 12:37 PM
Eforce actually has a patent on their "bypass stringing":

http://inlinethumb42.webshots.com/37609/2597773770047498848S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2597773770047498848PsDGCI)

It is designed that none of the 8 center main strings are adjacent to another string linked thru the head of the frame:

http://inlinethumb64.webshots.com/27775/2123049960047498848S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2123049960047498848HJzREx)

Hitting at the end of the frame doesn't allow the string room to deflect/stretch like it does in the middle of the sweet spot. The bypass pattern allows some of the stress to be passed to strings that are not in contact with the ball . A standard pattern places all this stress is in very small section of string - leading to shearing at the frame. Please excuse my crude attempts at illustrating this:

http://inlinethumb38.webshots.com/32933/2451977560047498848S600x600Q85.jpg (http://sports.webshots.com/photo/2451977560047498848SxPiZr)

mpenders
03-03-2008, 12:42 PM
With that explained - I must say that I have no appreciation or understanding of the logic behind the IGS (inner grommet system) for the crosses on the Head rball racquets. Just a PITA with no redeeming value, if you ask me...

YULitle
03-03-2008, 01:21 PM
Nice. Very informative.

LoveThisGame
03-03-2008, 04:02 PM
Head's interior grommet system and multifilament strings add time to stringing, both "pushing on a string" and the tensioning.

Stringing racquetball frames, because of the physical setup and the care needed, takes longer than for tennis frames, generally speaking.

Grommets for tennis are much superior today than a decade or two ago. Grommets for racquetball have better material and there have been some frame design improvements, but the nature of the game and the frame means that grommets are still an issue.

jamauss
03-03-2008, 06:56 PM
Haha, it's funny that someone started a thread about this. I just had to string an E-Force Bedlam last night. Whenever I get them I know I'm going to be in for an hour-long string job using a drinking straw, pliers, a vacuum, fishing weights, duct tape, and whatever other tools are used to make stringing E-Force racquets easier. :lol:

Maybe I should just refuse to continue stringing E-Force rball racquets. I wouldn't be the only shop in town to do so.

Belmonte13
03-04-2008, 08:44 AM
indeed very informative mpenders! exactly what i was looking for, but because i understand it better now doesn't mean i like stringing them any better! and i also dont see the logic in the IGS system....just another hassle

iplaybetter
03-04-2008, 09:07 AM
Haha, it's funny that someone started a thread about this. I just had to string an E-Force Bedlam last night. Whenever I get them I know I'm going to be in for an hour-long string job using a drinking straw, pliers, a vacuum, fishing weights, duct tape, and whatever other tools are used to make stringing E-Force racquets easier. :lol:

Maybe I should just refuse to continue stringing E-Force rball racquets. I wouldn't be the only shop in town to do so.

i want to hear a writeup of that

SW Stringer
03-04-2008, 11:42 AM
With that explained - I must say that I have no appreciation or understanding of the logic behind the IGS (inner grommet system) for the crosses on the Head rball racquets. Just a PITA with no redeeming value, if you ask me...

The racquet manufacturers make changes every year so they'll have something different to sell. The IGS on the crosses is an extension of the IGS at the throat from a manufacturing viewpoint. It might make the frame a little bit stronger with fewer holes being drilled - but mostly, it's just different.

mpenders
03-04-2008, 12:20 PM
The racquet manufacturers make changes every year so they'll have something different to sell. The IGS on the crosses is an extension of the IGS at the throat from a manufacturing viewpoint. It might make the frame a little bit stronger with fewer holes being drilled - but mostly, it's just different.


Oh, I completely understand and appreciate that it's mostly marketing at it's finest, and that some new "technology" must be presented with each season's new frames.

I don't mind the IGS system at the throat of the rball frames. It can be awkward accessing them while the frame is mounted to the machine, but pretty simple if you prestring the mains before mounting. It's not too difficult, considering that all mains will be tensioned at the head. But to put the IGS in for the crosses too didn't make much sense to me - especially from a stringer's standpoint.

From a playability point of view, the IGS models were very well thought of, players loved them. However, they broke...very easily...very frequently.

The 165g model was quickly discontinued due to it's nature to almost self-destruct. The IGS system in the crosses was also discontinued at the same time...just a coincidence? I don't know that the IGS system in the crosses provided for a stronger, more durable frame. More powerful? Perhaps - I can't really comment on that.

meowmix
03-04-2008, 05:34 PM
This will show my complete lack of understanding of racketball: do you string racketball rackets on the same machine as you would a tennis racket? Ex a Klippermate or Gamma XE6?

mpenders
03-04-2008, 09:08 PM
This will show my complete lack of understanding of racketball: do you string racketball rackets on the same machine as you would a tennis racket? Ex a Klippermate or Gamma XE6?

Yup. However, with the "ridiculous patterns" that are common, fixed swivel clamps make life MUCH easier...

dennis10is
03-05-2008, 03:40 PM
Yup. However, with the "ridiculous patterns" that are common, fixed swivel clamps make life MUCH easier...

MP,

I was about to reply to the OP but your answer is much superior to what mine would have been. I string my own tennis racket but I would never bother to have my racquetball racket restrung. Life is too short.

mpenders
03-05-2008, 05:02 PM
MP,

I was about to reply to the OP but your answer is much superior to what mine would have been. I string my own tennis racket but I would never bother to have my racquetball racket restrung. Life is too short.

I would assume that most casual rball players don't get their racquets restrung either. Why would you when you can buy another one brand new from wallyworld, SA or Big5 for almost the same price as a string job?

I can understand that. My kids have a cheapo badminton set they use out on the front lawn. It can be amusing, but not competitive in any way (IMO, anyway). Could I restring the badminton racquets (rackets?) if I wanted to? Probably - my machine is more than capable. Would I even consider it? Not a chance in hell. In my opinion, they are disposable and will be replaced long before I would even try to find where to get string for them.

I play rball competitively - so do many of the players I string for. I can assure you that my racquets can not be found at wally's, and are far from disposable. When you've made a significant investment in your equipment, you expect it to peform at it's highest level. Fresh strings make a HUGE difference. Remember, rball is all about power. Old, lifeless strings don't provide it.

All rball racquets are sold prestrung, unlike most tennis frames. There's no telling how long the strings have been in the frame, losing elasticity. Serious players are likely to cut them out before ever hitting with them, and have it restrung with their preferred string & tensions.

If you're ready to upgrade, I can steer you in the direction of a relatively inexpensive, high-end rball racquet that has a standard, non-fan pattern. It's as easy to string as any tennis frame you've done, and might make the game a bit more enjoyable for you.

jamauss
03-07-2008, 10:22 PM
So wouldn't you know it...

I string up a crazy E-Force racquet (SuperLite 170) and the guy refuses to accept it because it had one section where the strings overlapped outside of the frame. :x

I hate having to re-string any racquet, let alone an E-Force. :(

chiapants226
03-07-2008, 10:27 PM
lol do you charge more for the restringing of racquetball racquets?? :p

jamauss
03-07-2008, 10:30 PM
Nope...however...

I just made a new price change because of this...

labor cost on E-Force racquets where the strings go down around the bottom of the handle is $20 instead of $15 because it takes me much longer to string them.

Time is $....

chiapants226
03-07-2008, 10:37 PM
haha you should charge more :p if it takes you longer to restring it, you should charge more! thats what i would do. being the cheap asian that i am :)

meowmix
06-16-2009, 03:04 PM
This thread amuses me... bump :)

djones
12-27-2012, 10:56 AM
raquetball is just a ******** form of squash

Indeed :-)
What a lousy, clumsy non-athletic sport it is.
Why bother playing a silly sport like that!?

arche3
12-27-2012, 11:14 AM
There is a little bag for racquetball racquets as well. Looks just like a smaller tennis bag. And the racquets are expensive. Around 150

Rock Strongo
12-27-2012, 01:08 PM
Because this thread is bumped I have to say that this:

Haha, it's funny that someone started a thread about this. I just had to string an E-Force Bedlam last night. Whenever I get them I know I'm going to be in for an hour-long string job using a drinking straw, pliers, a vacuum, fishing weights, duct tape, and whatever other tools are used to make stringing E-Force racquets easier.


Sounds like something MacGyver would do to create some form of weapon of mass destruction.

db10s
12-27-2012, 02:20 PM
This is good humor.