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View Full Version : Is 10.9-11 oz racquet too heavy for a 10 year old girl?


danb
03-05-2008, 12:23 PM
My daughter went to a USTA national camp and I was told that 10.9 ounces racquet is too heavy. She is pretty fit but not very tall nor the strongest for her age.
This is what she is using:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCDUNLOP-DAG300.html

The grip size is 1/8 - I think that's OK.

I think this:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCVOLKL-B11L.html
would be even better (more head light) but is still above the 9.8-10.2 recommended by USTA.

I would REALLY appreciate ANY input. At her age paint job is very important (don't laugh - she is a girl...) and she also says she prefers the "heavy racquets" - heavy for her means 10.5-11

thanks,
Dan

nickb
03-05-2008, 12:36 PM
If she is not hitting late, has no arm issues and can swing the frame fast enough/not get easily tired from using it then she should be fine with the AG300.

Its not a stiff frame and it swings pretty light...shes fine IMO..

If you want to make the frame a tad lighter you could shave the bumper guard off (leaving the inner grommet strip) to remove some weight...this will lower the SW and make it more HL..

Good luck

Nick

danb
03-05-2008, 12:41 PM
If she is not hitting late, has no arm issues and can swing the frame fast enough/not get easily tired from using it then she should be fine with the AG300.

Its not a stiff frame and it swings pretty light...shes fine IMO..

If you want to make the frame a tad lighter you could shave the bumper guard off (leaving the inner grommet strip) to remove some weight...this will lower the SW and make it more HL..

Good luck

Nick

She does hit late on some faster forehands but she is in time on the (two-handed) backend.
A few times she complained that the voleys bend her wrist - I guess the racquet is not enough head-light - I don't know.
I do appreciate your reply.

drakulie
03-05-2008, 01:02 PM
Here is an 8 year old girl who hits with a one hander, and uses the babolat Pure drive???

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=183434

The answer to your question is really>>>> "what is your daughter comfortable with??"

danb
03-05-2008, 01:20 PM
Here is an 8 year old girl who hits with a one hander, and uses the babolat Pure drive???

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=183434

The answer to your question is really>>>> "what is your daughter comfortable with??"

It may be a junior Pure drive racquet ... How do you know is the adult one? Just wondering...

drakulie
03-05-2008, 01:26 PM
^^^ Her father posts on the boards. It is the adult Pure drive.

danb
03-05-2008, 01:28 PM
^^^ Her father posts on the boards. It is the adult Pure drive.

Thank you!

drakulie
03-05-2008, 01:34 PM
You sir, are welcome.

If I remember correctly, his name is ninaz???

danb
03-05-2008, 01:48 PM
You sir, are welcome.

If I remember correctly, his name is ninaz???

A lot of nice people on these boards - thank you again.

kungfusmkim
03-05-2008, 01:58 PM
i think a PD might be too stiff on the girls arms. i suggest go for soemthing that head light and also racquet is light. Maybe something like the N5 or the N5 force? its lightweight its flexxy and its also generates power. But if shes confertable with her racquet go ahead. But just that a PD is a bit stiff for her growing hands.

kungfusmkim
03-05-2008, 01:59 PM
I tihnk the dunlop Ag 300 is fine for her its 6 which isnt bad.

tennissavy
03-05-2008, 02:05 PM
OMG, I need to tell you something so brace yourself.

Her racquet is probably too light. That' right, too light. That is why she is feeling it move around on volleys. Please keep in mind that children were using 13-14oz. wood racquets years ago. As long as the racquet is properly balanced a heavier racquet will help your daughter in every aspect of her game and health. If you don't believe me, just do a little research on the internet and you will see that Roman Prokes(who customizes racquets for Sharapova, Roddick, Davydenko, etc.) says exactly what I am saying.

sureshs
03-05-2008, 02:12 PM
^^^^That is old-think. Today's lighter racquets are very comfortable and stable. Roman Prokes strings for the pros, so his perspective will be different. 11 oz strung is OK for a 10 year old. The Aerogel 300 is supposedly an extremely comfortable racquet, with rubber dampener sleeves and a couple of other features.

tennissavy
03-05-2008, 02:31 PM
^^^^That is old-think. Today's lighter racquets are very comfortable and stable. Roman Prokes strings for the pros, so his perspective will be different. 11 oz strung is OK for a 10 year old. The Aerogel 300 is supposedly an extremely comfortable racquet, with rubber dampener sleeves and a couple of other features.

I want to make this clear, as a client of Roman Prokes, that he advises everyone (not just the pros but the general public) to use the heaviest possible racquet that he or she can swing.

chiru
03-05-2008, 02:39 PM
I want to make this clear, as a client of Roman Prokes, that he advises everyone (not just the pros but the general public) to use the heaviest possible racquet that he or she can swing.

True. But what suresh said is also true. the 300 is a fine series. it's not like she's using a tweener or a granny stick or anything. as far as the ppl saying that racket is too heavy for her, thats the kind of thinking that has put an end to variety in the women's game "shes too much of a girl to move forward, she's not tall enough to volley" yah yah give it a rest i say.

If you're daughter is having trouble with volleys at net, a lighter stick will only make it harder to hit a nice solid volley as a more stable racket at net is almost without exception the heavier racket. this just indicates she needs to get a bit stronger in her wrist and she will with practice up there. equipment is fine imo.

sureshs
03-05-2008, 02:44 PM
I want to make this clear, as a client of Roman Prokes, that he advises everyone (not just the pros but the general public) to use the heaviest possible racquet that he or she can swing.

He is old-school I suppose - been around a long time. Guys like him and Tom Avery are all exponents of heavy racquets. These days it is more like finding the appropriate swingweight rather than just going heavy. The correct swingweight which can be sustained over an hour or two and which enables fast swings. One handed backhands seem to need heavier and more HL balance - that is, old school sticks. I am betting this girl has a 2 hander. What she needs is the swingweight with which she can swing fast. That is what counts these days.

racquet_jedi
03-05-2008, 02:54 PM
OMG, I need to tell you something so brace yourself.

Her racquet is probably too light. That' right, too light. That is why she is feeling it move around on volleys. Please keep in mind that children were using 13-14oz. wood racquets years ago. As long as the racquet is properly balanced a heavier racquet will help your daughter in every aspect of her game and health. If you don't believe me, just do a little research on the internet and you will see that Roman Prokes(who customizes racquets for Sharapova, Roddick, Davydenko, etc.) says exactly what I am saying.

Keywords are "years ago"...

How fast did they hit back then?
How much spin?
What kind of grip?
What was the fitness like?

danb
03-05-2008, 02:59 PM
OMG, I need to tell you something so brace yourself.

Her racquet is probably too light. That' right, too light. That is why she is feeling it move around on volleys. Please keep in mind that children were using 13-14oz. wood racquets years ago. As long as the racquet is properly balanced a heavier racquet will help your daughter in every aspect of her game and health. If you don't believe me, just do a little research on the internet and you will see that Roman Prokes(who customizes racquets for Sharapova, Roddick, Davydenko, etc.) says exactly what I am saying.

This doesn't come as a surprise - I heard this before. This is why I am having such a tough time with the USTA coach's recomendation...

danb
03-05-2008, 03:01 PM
He is old-school I suppose - been around a long time. Guys like him and Tom Avery are all exponents of heavy racquets. These days it is more like finding the appropriate swingweight rather than just going heavy. The correct swingweight which can be sustained over an hour or two and which enables fast swings. One handed backhands seem to need heavier and more HL balance - that is, old school sticks. I am betting this girl has a 2 hander. What she needs is the swingweight with which she can swing fast. That is what counts these days.

Yes - you're right - she has a 2 handed BH. How is a 10.9 and 4 points HL racquest - is it OK?

danb
03-05-2008, 03:02 PM
Just so you all know - thank you and I appreciate your advice.

chiru
03-05-2008, 03:06 PM
Yes - you're right - she has a 2 handed BH. How is a 10.9 and 4 points HL racquest - is it OK?

I really suggest not worrying too much about her equipment at this age. i reckon that at this age the racket that really hlep her the most are head heavy and a lot lighter and a lot more powerful, but you can't really grow into those rackets.

Now some of ya'll are gonna jump on me and say i'm biased cuz i still play with a ps85. but hear me out.

she's still too young to have a good idea of what kind of power she'll be needing form a racket as her age progresses. right now, she's not getting the maximal power from her racket as she could be, but soon she'll be needing a bit more control, and being used to a slightly heavier frame (although imo the 300 series is really by no means a heavy racket)) she'll already be a bit more used to the style of racket even girls usually grow into.

I reckon I'd worry a lot more about keeping her on the practice courts and working on what she needs to be working on in therms of game play and motivation and having a good time. the time for worrying about equipment will come when she's a bit older.

sureshs
03-05-2008, 03:11 PM
Yes - you're right - she has a 2 handed BH. How is a 10.9 and 4 points HL racquest - is it OK?

It may surprise you to hear me say that I am not sure, because I use a 12.1 oz racquet which is 8 pts HL!

I think if she is sticking to 10.9 oz, which could be heavy by her standards, then she should go more headlight. In general, if you are using a racquet which would be considered heavy for your build/level, it is better to play it safe and go more HL, say 6 pts. If she goes down to 10.5 oz, she can live with this balance. Not that it is good for her arm, but because more HL will make the shots weaker.

But this is all speculation. Someone without bias needs to look at her playing, observe her size, whether she has trouble getting to the ball early, is she getting tired quickly, is she adjusting her style to be different from those of her peers because of her racquet, etc.

Pro_Tour_630
03-05-2008, 03:34 PM
YOUR SEARCH IS OVER either the Nfury (blue now discontinued) or the new Nfury TWO below, there is a reason they are on back order already in small sizes, it is very soft on the arm, the softest on the market flexs at 50 when have we seen that except on Max200G form the 80's

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCWILSON-NFURY2.html

show here this, the paint job is cool

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/viewlarge.html?PCODE=NFURY2

danb
03-05-2008, 04:13 PM
YOUR SEARCH IS OVER either the Nfury (blue now discontinued) or the new Nfury TWO below, there is a reason they are on back order already in small sizes, it is very soft on the arm, the softest on the market flexs at 50 when have we seen that except on Max200G form the 80's

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCWILSON-NFURY2.html

show here this, the paint job is cool

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/viewlarge.html?PCODE=NFURY2

Cool you understand how important the PJ is for kids:)
She tried 2 racquets about this weight and she doesn't like anything that light. I could BS her into using one of these racquets but a lot of people tell me to let her choose.
The thing is that some people think the racquet is too heavy.
Oh, boy - I think I'll stop worying and just let her play with the "heavy" 10.9 racquet. What can I say - I am using one of the heaviest racquest - never played with anything less than 12 oz nor bigger head than 93.

chiru
03-05-2008, 04:20 PM
Cool you understand how important the PJ is for kids:)
She tried 2 racquets about this weight and she doesn't like anything that light. I could BS her into using one of these racquets but a lot of people tell me to let her choose.
The thing is that some people think the racquet is too heavy.
Oh, boy - I think I'll stop worying and just let her play with the "heavy" 10.9 racquet. What can I say - I am using one of the heaviest racquest - never played with anything less than 12 oz nor bigger head than 93.

okay if she doesn't want something that light screw it. nothing affects your game as much as your head, and trust me if she thinks something feels too light and flimsy cuz she feels other ppl forced her into it then its DEF not worth any perceived improvement.

chiru
03-05-2008, 06:58 PM
However, there's a difference. I severely doubt that danb's daughter who's 10 years old, hitting against what seems to be fairly competitive juniors is going to be able to generate enough power with a 12.5 ounce racket. If she's comfortable with the AG 300, she's fine. The volleying problem can be fixed with a bit more practice, and perhaps a change in technique (boy, technique can REALLY make a difference in whether my wrist is hurting after a hard hit volley). Those that recommend the super oversize racket for juniors, I must politely disagree. I started off with a 12.5+ ounce aluminum racket (this was when I was 8 ). My coach then recommended to me, and I ultimately switched to, a n5 OS. My game went completely downhill from there. I couldn't hit anything in the court! A superlight, OS racket won't help your daughter. The AG 300 is a great stick to be starting out with: not too heavy so that your daughter won't be able to swing it for very long, and a moderate head size.

My opinion: keep the AG 300! For the volleying problem, have someone take a look at her technique.

PS, a 8 with a ) gets turned into a 8). Really ANNOYING!

agreed. minimum length.

meowmix
03-05-2008, 06:59 PM
that doesn't mean your club level player shouldn't be using it. i'm so sick of ppl strongly recommending person x y z to use racket a b c based on if we think "they're good enough." how do we know? we haven't even seen her play? just let her hit with whatever she wants shes 10 for pete's sake. let her just have some fun out there.

Definately. I think we're getting beyond the point here: it's a 10 year old playing tennis. Not some competitive college kid play D1 tennis. Forget about weight. If she's having fun, it's the right racket for her.

meowmix
03-05-2008, 07:05 PM
According to Prokes, they should. Oh, but you must know more than him and me.:wink:

Tennissavy, we're not disagreeing that a player should play with the heaviest stick that they can handle. We're stating that a competitive 10 year old is not going to be able to handle the pace being put on those balls by her fellow competitive juniors. The era of wood rackets is gone: the reason children were able to hit with 13+ ounce rackets with a HS of 70 is because the ball speed was much slower back then. A good 10 year old should be able to easily take out a not so great 15 year old, despite the fact that the 15 year old can hit a heck of a lot harder. These 10 year olds these days can hit far harder than a 10 year old 40 years ago because the modern racket is much stiffer and more powerful. A 10 year old (provided that they're not absolutely jacked) cannot play with a 12+ ounce racket with a swingweight of 340+ and hope to stay competitive.

chiru
03-05-2008, 11:54 PM
You are absolutely missing the point and are wrong. If a child can handle a 12+ ounce racquet, properly balanced so he or she can swing it easily, then this child will be the most competitive. Oh, but Prokes and I know nothing.

I agree. i use a ps85 with 2 layers of 6 inches of lead at 3 and 9 to use the heaviest possible racket, and im a pretty small guy.

while i agree with you in theory. she's a 10 yr. old girl. i know the OP wanted advice, but i think the advice he needs is to stop worrying about getting advice about rackets, and worry more about tennis: strokes, mentality (especially this one at this age) and learning how to compete. maybe a 12 oz woudl help her, maybe a 10 oz would help her at this age. its really hard to tell, but my point is, you wont be too too wrong with a 300. its a good racket and i dont think the player nor her fathershould be too worried about this.

Kaptain Karl
03-06-2008, 04:50 AM
<Mod Mode> Cleaned-up this thread by zapping a LOT of off-topic and trolling posts. </Mod Mode>


danb - First, the "disclaimer". None of us has seen your daughter play. You and the TP have....

Please be as unemotional and objective as a parent can possibly be ... and make the best choice for your daughter.

I taught tennis for years. Now I'm coaching HS (Boys & Girls). My Girls Team has 42 players -- of all sizes. Personal preferences must be taken into account, but the Dunlop your daughter is currently using doesn't seem like a "mis-match" to me.

Any player, regardless of size, should play with the heaviest racket they can comfortably play with against someone as good or better ... for the duration of a three-set match. (You'll notice this "guideline" doesn't mention anything about using a Touring Pro's racket as a "standard".)

As a coach, I occasionally find myself suggesting a player who *thinks* they are hitting a good ball with "Racket A" try "B, C or D." (These years, I can remember advising only one player to go lighter. Usually young players choose sticks which are too light for their ability ... for whatever reasons.)

danb, I'm suspicious your daughter's TP is under 25 years of age(?). TPs and coaches of the X Generation seem to have a bias toward lighter rackets, and I don't get it.

That being posted....


Please keep in mind that children were using 13-14oz. wood racquets years ago.This is flat-out not true. (Another TT-er with a huge post count is very fond of this canard.)

I started tennis in 1973. My young friends and I played with the lightest (adult) wood rackets we could find (and plenty of woodies were under 13 oz. -- or we played with "Junior" woodies (which felt, to me, like they were made of Balsa Wood) -- or dad would cut two inches off the handle of an Adult frame and we played with that version of a "Junior" racket.

- KK

tennissavy
03-06-2008, 05:26 AM
<Mod Mode> Cleaned-up this thread by zapping a LOT of off-topic and trolling posts. </Mod Mode>


danb - First, the "disclaimer". None of us has seen your daughter play. You and the TP have....

Please be as unemotional and objective as a parent can possibly be ... and make the best choice for your daughter.

I taught tennis for years. Now I'm coaching HS (Boys & Girls). My Girls Team has 42 players -- of all sizes. Personal preferences must be taken into account, but the Dunlop your daughter is currently using doesn't seem like a "mis-match" to me.

Any player, regardless of size, should play with the heaviest racket they can comfortably play with against someone as good or better ... for the duration of a three-set match. (You'll notice this "guideline" doesn't mention anything about using a Touring Pro's racket as a "standard".)

As a coach, I occasionally find myself suggesting a player who *thinks* they are hitting a good ball with "Racket A" try "B, C or D." (These years, I can remember advising only one player to go lighter. Usually young players choose sticks which are too light for their ability ... for whatever reasons.)

danb, I'm suspicious your daughter's TP is under 25 years of age(?). TPs and coaches of the X Generation seem to have a bias toward lighter rackets, and I don't get it.

That being posted....


This is flat-out not true. (Another TT-er with a huge post count is very fond of this canard.)

I started tennis in 1973. My young friends and I played with the lightest (adult) wood rackets we could find (and plenty of woodies were under 13 oz. -- or we played with "Junior" woodies (which felt, to me, like they were made of Balsa Wood) -- or dad would cut two inches off the handle of an Adult frame and we played with that version of a "Junior" racket.

- KK

Actually, it is true. I sold a racquet for a female friend on **** a year ago. It was wood and weighed 13.4 ozs. She told me that it was her very first racquet which she used when she was 6 years old.

Here is also a section from "Introduction to Racquet Science"

http://www.racquetresearch.com/sevencri.htm


Is a Lightweight Racquet a Good Idea?

No, a lightweight racquet is a dumb idea, as pro customizers attest. Weight is not bad. You need weight to return a "heavy" ball (lots of pace and spin). Wimpy racquets can't put much pace on the ball if you don't have time to develop a long stroke, such as when you are stretched wide. Pete Sampras uses a racquet that is 14 oz. and evenly balanced, and when he is going for a putaway, he chokes down so the swingweight is even higher. Andre Agassi uses one that is 13.2 ounces and 5/8 inch (5 points) head-light. Mark Philippoussis uses one that is 13.5 ounces and is 3/4 inch head light. Lest you think that these heroic sticks are as unwieldy as the sword of Goliath, remember that the lightest wood racquet was 13 ounces. Ladies and children used them.

So, you should not be so quick to call my statement a "canard". What I am saying is true.

Kaptain Karl
03-06-2008, 06:42 AM
Let's remember the point of this thread ... to help the OP with his question about his daughter's racket.

Please start your own thread if you want to prove your off-topic minor points.

- KK

Pro_Tour_630
03-06-2008, 07:41 AM
Cool you understand how important the PJ is for kids:)
She tried 2 racquets about this weight and she doesn't like anything that light. I could BS her into using one of these racquets but a lot of people tell me to let her choose.
The thing is that some people think the racquet is too heavy.
Oh, boy - I think I'll stop worying and just let her play with the "heavy" 10.9 racquet. What can I say - I am using one of the heaviest racquest - never played with anything less than 12 oz nor bigger head than 93.

Hey you can always add lead to it :-)

I have a 5 year old who plays better than some players twice his age, and color/graphics is important. HE plays with a prince turbo Diablo. I cut out the strings since it came with a very thick and stiff 15g at high tension, and installed a thinner softer string at lower tension.
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCPRINCE-PTDIABLOJUN.html

look at the specs on that thing it is a "players frame" for kids, seriously it is 20mm thickness constant beam, all graphite and flexs under 50, sounds like a frame I should play with if it were 27 and heavier. Prince regional rep told me Prince was not making any money from this frame. It is built like a "players frame" not the washed down versions, I hit with it is very solid. I would not recommend it to 10 year olds since it is 25". 26 is better for 10 year olds but If she can handle 27 then that is fine. IMO, I would start with the lightest (if she is late) and most flexible. If you go heavy, HH and stiff she may be late with her swing plus it might hurt her arm.

You are the parent, you know more than her about lots of things and you want the best for her. All parents want the best for their children.

At age 10 I was playing with 13oz dunlop maxplys with 3/4 leather grip:shock: It was tough, go figure

sureshs
03-06-2008, 08:02 AM
to Racquet Science"

http://www.racquetresearch.com/sevencri.htm



That oft-quoted site is frozen in time. Have you seen the last year they did racquet rankings? 2002!

Comfort technology like Aerogel (not the material but the dampeners put after cutting the racquet in two, and foam inside the racquet) and Microgel were not around. Microgel really works - my Head Prestige Pro with an absurdly low swingweight of 316 is extremely stable and comfortable.

From what I read, the 2008 edition of Aerogel 300 should be very comfortable.

Pro_Tour_630
03-06-2008, 08:15 AM
From what I read, the 2008 edition of Aerogel 300 should be very comfortable.

I imported two Dunlop Aerogels 400g from the UK for a friend that has been playing the 400g since they came out and he says the Aerogels are the best he has played with. I played with the 200g aerogel and did not care for it much. As for the 300AG, it has the largest following:confused:

tennissavy
03-06-2008, 08:24 AM
That oft-quoted site is frozen in time. Have you seen the last year they did racquet rankings? 2002!

Comfort technology like Aerogel (not the material but the dampeners put after cutting the racquet in two, and foam inside the racquet) and Microgel were not around. Microgel really works - my Head Prestige Pro with an absurdly low swingweight of 316 is extremely stable and comfortable.

From what I read, the 2008 edition of Aerogel 300 should be very comfortable.

Well, Prokes is not frozen in time. He says exactly what that site I linked states.