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View Full Version : Seriously, does anyone still use a wood racket? Please share your experience, thanks!


roundiesee
03-10-2008, 03:37 PM
I remember reading some time ago, how Breakpoint beat his opponent using a wood racket (a Maxply Fort I believe). Some posters have even said that the "feel" of wood is second to none. I've also recently found new posts of how people have suffered from bad cases of tennis elbow. I know that some modern graphite rackets have been designed expressly for players with TE (Prokennex 5G etc) and some older models have been known to be comfortable rackets (eg POG OS etc). But surely nothing beats the comfort and flex of a wood racket? And some of these wood rackets are still available on TW for about 59-69 dollars under the vintage section.
So question is why don't more "recreational" players play with wood, esp those with TE? Would seem logical it seems, since these players are not those who enter competitions but simply play tennis because they love the game.
Any views and comments would be much appreciated, thanks!

rooski
03-10-2008, 03:54 PM
Like many on this board, I grew up playing with Jack Kramer wood rackets. I still pull one out every once in a while for a hit. It takes a little while to get used to hitting the sweetspot in a 60 sq in racket but after an adjustment period I can play fine with it (I have to hit more continental on the FH vs. my normal SW grip).

I used a 13+ oz Kramer as 7 year old so you don't have to be a gorilla to swing one. RE: the woodies in the vintage section...many of those have huge grips and many of them are spec'd up in weight ...so many of them don't really represent the wood rackets of my youth. Still, it's worth trying a woodie so if nothing else you can appreciate how good guys like Laver and Borg were. It's a whole different game :)

tennisp13
03-10-2008, 04:33 PM
I used wood racket to play double sometime. Actually, all 4 of us do. It still take a while to get used to it but it all fun. Well, I enjoy it cause it very fun and you have to be very fundamental, no fancy stuffs :)

aceroberts13
03-10-2008, 05:21 PM
I had a Dunlop Maxply McEnroe that I used to bust out in volley practice in high school sometimes. That's the only time I have used one seriously. I don't think it helped. :(

beth14
03-10-2008, 07:17 PM
Amazing ditto. I too have a a Jack Kramer in the closet that I played for years as a youth. Loved it. And y'all have teased me, I think it is coming out of mothballs again just to see.... I think I still have my first original Stan Smith "ton of racket" there as well, but it has a bit of a hockey stick curve to it!
But the answer to the original question is no I don't use it. My "NEW" racket -- a Pro Staff Classic -- is very arm friendly.

Mick
03-11-2008, 04:26 PM
I used wood racquets against a whole bunch of guys and had great successes. One day I played this guy and he almost bageled me. I switched to a modern graphite racquet at 0 - 5 and managed to win one game before losing the set.

Lesson learned is wood racquets are only good when you use them to play against lower level players.

Bud
03-11-2008, 05:33 PM
I remember reading some time ago, how Breakpoint beat his opponent using a wood racket (a Maxply Fort I believe). Some posters have even said that the "feel" of wood is second to none. I've also recently found new posts of how people have suffered from bad cases of tennis elbow. I know that some modern graphite rackets have been designed expressly for players with TE (Prokennex 5G etc) and some older models have been known to be comfortable rackets (eg POG OS etc). But surely nothing beats the comfort and flex of a wood racket? And some of these wood rackets are still available on TW for about 59-69 dollars under the vintage section.
So question is why don't more "recreational" players play with wood, esp those with TE? Would seem logical it seems, since these players are not those who enter competitions but simply play tennis because they love the game.
Any views and comments would be much appreciated, thanks!


To address your specific questions... they are more difficult to play with... head is much smaller, racquet is much heavier and you have to supply your own power. Also, your fundamentals must be sound or you'll be framing every shot. There's also the stigma of being seen on court swinging a 30 year old racquet. I love playing with wood racquets and I do so, occasionally.

Bjornborg23
03-11-2008, 10:31 PM
I love using a wood racquet, the sweet science of tennis is a wood racquet. Using the wood racquet takes pricision compared to new age racquets. Its hard to find wood racquet tournaments, that involves singles!

Finding a local player who would enjoy a good wood racquet ,match is hard to find. I use a midsize Wood racquet, right now, and still use the standard model, a borg Pro. I live in california, and so far ive played a few players, but they dont normally use a wood racquet and are not very good at playing with one. Anyone want a game?

Deuce
03-12-2008, 01:06 AM
I remember reading some time ago, how Breakpoint beat his opponent using a wood racket (a Maxply Fort I believe). Some posters have even said that the "feel" of wood is second to none. I've also recently found new posts of how people have suffered from bad cases of tennis elbow. I know that some modern graphite rackets have been designed expressly for players with TE (Prokennex 5G etc) and some older models have been known to be comfortable rackets (eg POG OS etc). But surely nothing beats the comfort and flex of a wood racket? And some of these wood rackets are still available on TW for about 59-69 dollars under the vintage section.
So question is why don't more "recreational" players play with wood, esp those with TE? Would seem logical it seems, since these players are not those who enter competitions but simply play tennis because they love the game.
Any views and comments would be much appreciated, thanks!
The unfortunate truth is that, because of the racquet companies constantly promoting how much 'better' their newer and newer gimmicks are (they call it 'technology' - a nice 'buzzword'), many people are afraid - even terrified - of using a wood racquet. They liken it to trying to play with a frying pan, or some other device not meant for tennis.
Of course, this is simply irrational paranoia, as many once skeptical people have overcome their skepticism/fear and tried a wood racquet and been very pleasantly surprised.

Threads like this can only help to encourage people to lose their silly fear and try it. Thanks for starting it.

classic tennis
03-12-2008, 01:15 AM
I remember reading some time ago, how Breakpoint beat his opponent using a wood racket (a Maxply Fort I believe). Some posters have even said that the "feel" of wood is second to none. I've also recently found new posts of how people have suffered from bad cases of tennis elbow. I know that some modern graphite rackets have been designed expressly for players with TE (Prokennex 5G etc) and some older models have been known to be comfortable rackets (eg POG OS etc). But surely nothing beats the comfort and flex of a wood racket? And some of these wood rackets are still available on TW for about 59-69 dollars under the vintage section.
So question is why don't more "recreational" players play with wood, esp those with TE? Would seem logical it seems, since these players are not those who enter competitions but simply play tennis because they love the game.
Any views and comments would be much appreciated, thanks!

Every second sunday wood racquet doubles with some mates best of three sets for beers at the pub, it's great I suggest (those of you over 21) try it !

roundiesee
03-12-2008, 07:54 PM
The unfortunate truth is that, because of the racquet companies constantly promoting how much 'better' their newer and newer gimmicks are (they call it 'technology' - a nice 'buzzword'), many people are afraid - even terrified - of using a wood racquet. They liken it to trying to play with a frying pan, or some other device not meant for tennis.
Of course, this is simply irrational paranoia, as many once skeptical people have overcome their skepticism/fear and tried a wood racquet and been very pleasantly surprised.

Threads like this can only help to encourage people to lose their silly fear and try it. Thanks for starting it.

Thanks Deuce! :)
So there ARE still people who use wood, albeit sparingly. I agree whole heartedly with all who have posted on this thread, esp Deuce's assertion that the racket companies have got us "bamboozled" into thinking that wood is obsolete, and that their latest technology is the next best thing since sliced bread! :)
What really gets me are the (increasing?) number of people who get TE and other injuries from modern rackets/strings. It would seem logical for this group especially to at least consider trying wood rackets which are generally accepted as being much more flexible and would not harm the body as much if the correct technique is applied.
Hope there are still others out there; if so would really love to hear from you. Thanks!

Rabbit
03-12-2008, 07:57 PM
About 4 years ago, I got a wild hair and bought 5 Head Vilas frames of the big auction site and locally. I strung them up with gut and played a year of league spring 4.5, 8.0 and 9.0 mixed, and 8.5 combo with them. I won a lot more than I lost and had a big time playing iwth rackets that were in some cases older than my opponents. And then, as quickly as the wild hair came...it left and I went back to the C10.

Kirko
03-12-2008, 08:13 PM
I played from 1965 to 1982 with wood the same model the wilson jack kramer auto. then in 82 the hand writing was on the wall so far as wood was concerned. I played many guys with prince graphite and prince pros and still played well and won my share, but the for us guys who were around in the 1980's this was the glory period of great frames. we were in high clover!!!!!!!

LanEvo
03-12-2008, 09:16 PM
i have a few woodies but they are just sitting in my room collecting dust

greekfire
03-12-2008, 09:56 PM
an old rawling, made in pakistan, probably mid-1960's. I dare not hit with it, sentimental reasons, was my mothers, when she was in college. But they truly have great craftsmanship, the older models. Reading this forum has prompted me to seek one out.