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View Full Version : Pure Drive Roddick a Tweener


meowmix
03-11-2008, 06:01 PM
Since when? According to the racket categories on TW, the PDR is a tweener:confused: What?!! Sure it delivers nice power, but it's also 11.7 ounces. It's not like that power's uncontrollable. Anybody care to formulate an opinion as to why?

ollinger
03-11-2008, 06:29 PM
Categories such as "tweener" and "players' racquet" are entirely arbitrary, subjective, and essentially meaningless. So what does it matter??

Doc Hollidae
03-11-2008, 07:40 PM
The entire Pure Drive Line are game improvement rackets.

samster
03-11-2008, 07:45 PM
I don't think it is a tweener. It takes some skill and power and ability to hit topspin to manage the PDR.

doublefault2008
03-11-2008, 07:47 PM
Does it really matter? I play with a pdr and many people called it a chick stick or beginners racket but so what? I'd still play with it.

quest01
03-11-2008, 07:49 PM
The entire Pure Drive Line are game improvement rackets.

No way there are a lot of very good people who use the PDR and the Pure Drive.

quicken
03-11-2008, 08:09 PM
You gotta be JOKING.

samster
03-11-2008, 08:16 PM
You gotta be JOKING.

I never joke.

SFrazeur
03-11-2008, 08:17 PM
Categories such as "tweener" and "players' racquet" are entirely arbitrary, subjective, and essentially meaningless. So what does it matter??

I agree for the most part.


However, if someone does wish to use those terms then yes, it is a players racquets.

-SF

Klatu Verata Necktie
03-11-2008, 09:34 PM
Once Andy Roddick, Carlos Moya, and other Pure Drive users really learn how to play tennis, they can move on to a player's frame.

samster
03-11-2008, 09:42 PM
Once Andy Roddick, Carlos Moya, and other Pure Drive users really learn how to play tennis, they can move on to a player's frame.

Word..............

RoddickistheMan
03-11-2008, 10:21 PM
I dont think its a tweener. I had to play with it today. And it was no cake walk. The weight makes it play more like a players racquet imho.

Doc Hollidae
03-12-2008, 08:26 AM
No way there are a lot of very good people who use the PDR and the Pure Drive.

Yes there are plenty of good players who play with Pure Drives, however, it doesn't mean it hasn't improved their game. I've seen plenty of players make the switch to a Pure Drive and seen the power in their game increase significantly. The Pure Drive is truly a racket that makes playing tennis easier at all skill level.

I've tried demoing this racket 2-3 times already because of the results I've seen, but each time I've demoed it, I come away with the same impression; too stiff and too much power.

el sergento
03-12-2008, 10:23 AM
Once Andy Roddick, Carlos Moya, and other Pure Drive users really learn how to play tennis, they can move on to a player's frame.

You mean once they learn to hit a backhand right?? I kid, I kid:)

MichaelChang
03-12-2008, 10:30 AM
Why does this matter???
The best way to shut others up is to beat them in match, if you can, using the PDR.

Racket-Junkie
03-12-2008, 10:38 AM
just because a racket I'd a tweener doesn't mean a pro can't use it. A few pros on Prince's website are listed as using the hornet line. Heck, look at the Williams sisters, they've always used some form of tweener frame. Now granted these are all pj rackets, but paint can't hide huge head size and wide bodies, which is the essence of being a tweener. I had never heard of tweener used negatively until reading these boards. When I bought a pd 7 years ago it was because I was just getting back into tennis after a 4 year absence and wanting something that was a little on the game improvement side. Heck, I played my most competitive tennis with os profile 3.6s and mid sized hammer pro staffs, both of which are definitely tweener, and 14 year old tweener using me would double bagel 30 year old sp tour using me any day. This is just my opinion so take from it what you want, but I would definitely classify the entire pd line as tweener. That doesn't change the fact that they are fantastic rackets for some people and many pd users could whup up on me, just like using a 90" head doesn't mean you are automatically good (just read any of the 90 million posts on the topic).

JediMindTrick
03-12-2008, 12:01 PM
Power-wise it is a tweener.

meowmix
03-12-2008, 06:18 PM
I'm not complaining about it being a tweener, nor am I complaining about somebody beating me with a PDR. All I'm saying is that it's interesting that a PDR is classified as a tweener and the APD a player's stick. I find there's a small contradition there.

GMN
03-12-2008, 06:43 PM
I play with the PDR + and like it a lot. It has helped me on serve and return the most. Although it may not be my favorite racquet in just baseline rally practice, I learned that in a match I don't get into those baseline rallies very often. In other words, there are many times when I may be scrambling, defensive, or at the net and when I am in these positions the stiffer PDR + frame gives me a little more punch. Especially on return of serve against a big server, you can punch it back deep without a full long swing.

iradical18
03-12-2008, 06:49 PM
If you play well with it then who cares what people call it.

GMN
03-12-2008, 07:08 PM
Just like you have the modern forehand, the PDR is like the modern racquet. Its more explosive and generates more spin. Those are player's characteristics.

Nuke
03-13-2008, 03:41 AM
...Its more explosive and generates more spin. Those are player's characteristics.
No, a player's racquet is a low-powered control racquet that requires the player to generate the power and spin. A tweener or game-improvement racquet is a more powerful racquet that does some of the work for you. But there are too many racquet snobs here who are afraid of some perceived stigma from using a game-improvement racquet, as if that's an admission of some fault in their game.

GMN
03-13-2008, 06:19 AM
We need to ditch the old definition of a player's racquet being low powered. I have played with many of the so called "high power" light frames and to be honest I get more pace and power from a heavier "low powered player's stick". So to be honest a player's stick is really the most powerful. The only time this is not true is if you just stick out and don't swing it - like say in a defensive block situation. Otherwise so called player's sticks are the most powerful and stable.

nickb
03-13-2008, 07:07 AM
The PDR is considered a tweener because of its very high power level, thick beam and 100sqin head. Its a very easy racket to play with...

JRstriker12
03-13-2008, 07:17 AM
True a heavier "players racket" can produce a powerful ball, but the player has to provide most of that power.

A PDR has a more moderate power level due to its stiffness, and if you are talking about the PDR, it has a bit more weight, so it's a bit easier to hit a more powerful shot if you don't have really long and fast strokes.

But just because a PDR is a "tweener" racket doen't mean it's a bad racket.

tzinc
03-13-2008, 07:26 AM
A tweener means that it's between a beginner's racquet and player's racquet. It suggests that it's intermediate. Probably because it is powerful it gets labelled as such.

Nuke
03-13-2008, 12:10 PM
But a "player" can use a tweener and get massive power, if they can control it. Yeah, we need new names.

GMN
03-14-2008, 06:40 AM
There is nothing tweener about top 100 players that use these racquets or strong college players that use these tweener racquets. So I think the definition of a "player's racquet" needs to be revisited. I think "modern player's racquet" is a better name for racquets like these. It doesn't do any respect to the racquet to call it a tweener - its as if someone says, "you don't quite have a player's skill level yet, so use this tweener PDR instead." Thats not right.

DashaandSafin
03-14-2008, 06:53 AM
You people are idiots. The ones who haven't hit with a PDR please don't talk, you don't know anything.

The PDR is completely differnt from the PD. Its much harder to generate power. To be honest, i got just as much power from it as my MID FXP Prestige. I got much more spin from the PDR though, maybe thats what you mean by tweener.

chizzle
03-14-2008, 07:47 AM
Yes there are plenty of good players who play with Pure Drives, however, it doesn't mean it hasn't improved their game. I've seen plenty of players make the switch to a Pure Drive and seen the power in their game increase significantly. The Pure Drive is truly a racket that makes playing tennis easier at all skill level.

I've tried demoing this racket 2-3 times already because of the results I've seen, but each time I've demoed it, I come away with the same impression; too stiff and too much power.

I could not agree any more. I've tried the previous model and it was a mistake. I tried the newer versions, and it's the same thing: just too much. You really notice it around the net, not much feel (IMO).

Like I said, I wanted to play with it, but I can't handle the pop it has...

eric892
03-25-2008, 07:23 PM
The PDR+ is a good racquet. Who cares what other people say.

LPShanet
03-26-2008, 08:52 AM
Since when? According to the racket categories on TW, the PDR is a tweener:confused: What?!! Sure it delivers nice power, but it's also 11.7 ounces. It's not like that power's uncontrollable. Anybody care to formulate an opinion as to why?

Most of the categories used to describe racquets are selected based primarily on specs. Some of the specs used to determine the category a racquet might be placed in include weight (high for a player's racquet), swingweight, stiffness and head size. In the case of the PDR, its stiffness is in a range usually associated with "tweener" racquets, despite its increased weight.

For the record, "power" isn't a spec, as it's subjective and not consistently measurable.

Note: Although the Pure Drive series (including the Roddick) are listed as "tweeners" on the TW site, they're also included in the players frame section.

Note 2: While the Aeropro Drive isn't as stiff as the Pure Drive series, it also should probably be placed in the "tweener" category due to its light weight and fairly large head size.

strike
03-26-2008, 10:40 AM
from the TW PDR review (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/BPDR/BPDRReview.html), "There's no doubt the Pure Drive Team has redefined the player's racquet category by attracting more advanced players to stiffer, lighter racquets, and this version just sweetens the deal. Advanced players who may have found the Pure Drive family too light in the past may find this Roddick version an ideal fit."

Sounds like it's classified as a players racquet to me.

Classifications don't mean much anyhow...

gonzo2000
03-26-2008, 11:46 AM
It does not matter what it's called. I own one and everybody I play with is impressed with it, including those who own Prostaffs, Prestiges etc.

RoddickAce
03-26-2008, 11:57 AM
According to the racquet categories section on tw, the PDR + is a tweener racquet, but the PDR isn't. The PDR standard is considered a player's racquet. The only reason I think they put the PDR + in the tweener's category is because its 27.5 inches, longer than the "traditional" racquet length.