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View Full Version : Learn more before buying again?


Zoroaster
03-22-2004, 09:39 PM
Hello, I'm not sure if this is in the right section, but this one seemed most pertinent. I began playing tennis last summer and bought a fairly cheap racquet ($40?) because I didn't think I would become addicted :o

But now I know I'm here to stay :wink: , so what I'm wondering is if I should buy a good racquet before I start learning more or should I get better at tennis then find a racquet that fits my personal style?

Thanks A lot! :D

Brad

brijoel
03-22-2004, 10:17 PM
demo a few racquets off TW, if you can ever get em that is. you've been playing awhile it sounds like and could probably benefit from a frame that you feel more comfortable with than some racquet you bought just to use.
could you give us some info about your game, level of play, and perhaps swing? im sure many of us could direct you to a comprable racquet for you with a little more info.

kreative
03-22-2004, 10:21 PM
agree w/ brijoel. if you like your racquet now, then there'd be no reason to switch. if you're interested in a new frame, demo a couple that interest you and go from there. these boards as well as the main tw site has great info on racquets including specs, reviews, and customer feedback that can help you decide. ask yourself what your general preferences are: headsize (mid/midplus/oversize), length, power/control level.

Cypo
03-22-2004, 11:04 PM
I would say buy a good racquet. Your body can learn a lot of bad habits from a poor quality racquet. I know a couple of people who are in the process of relearning their strokes because they started with "game improvement" racquets and have gotton good enough that the "pushy" shots those racquets reward are a real weakness for them now.

I would go so far as to suggest getting the smallest head you can play with - as long as you're in it for the long haul - the more solid the foundation, the further you'll go.

Phil
03-23-2004, 12:54 AM
Hello, I'm not sure if this is in the right section, but this one seemed most pertinent.

Actually, if you take a closer look you may actually notice that the RACQUETS section may be the most pertinent home for your post. I'm just saying...

The advice offered below is fine-do check out the racquet board, keeping in mind your style of play, level, how often you play, goals, etc.

Bungalo Bill
03-23-2004, 09:10 AM
Well welcome to the sport! The racquet will not play a huge importance until your technique starts getting more solid. However, you want to buy a racquet that is ahead of your game right now, so you can develop into the racquet expecially is you are planning to get better.

SOme of the things to consider for your racquet search are:

1. The size of your stroke - long or short.

2. How much speed does your arm swing - fast or slow

3. What kind of game do you play - doubles or singles or both

4. What kind of style do you play with - Serve and volley, baseliner?

5. How strong are you - the weight of the racquet can make a huge difference in your enjoyment of the game. Some players start out with a players racquet which is heavier and have no problems with fatigue etc. Other start with a players racquet and can swing it no more then 4 times before they have to sit down and get some water.

All of these things should start to formulate around your personality. WHen you think you know what it is you want ot be go look for a racquet that will suit you. The best place is to post this in the racquet section. A local pro can help you with understanding your game and helpin your with this racquet selection.

Keep in mind, it is not uncommon to be on a holy grail racquet search for the rest of your tennis life!

Camilio Pascual
03-24-2004, 03:51 AM
I suggest you start out with an oversized or midplus tweener or players racquet that is flexible or has medium flexibility. I'm in the minority on this, but believe players' racquets are the most likely to cause you to learn good form. One of the arguments I hear against doing this is that the beginner needs power from the racquet. I say that is bunk, you are not going to learn how to generate power on your own with a 28mm beamed Wilson-Prince ThunderHammer. Others say that you will be overpowered on the court. By whom? The other beginners at your level? I don't see 2.5's whistling ground strokes past each other. I do see a lot of frustration at not keeping the ball in the court with the bazooka racquets.

kevhen
03-24-2004, 08:01 AM
See how much demos are at your local tennis store. Sometimes to demo is free or $5. See what weight, balance, grip size, etc work the best for you and your game before you buy. Do lots of demos if you can and demo your favorite racquets a second time.

Your game may change quite a bit as you improve, so don't spend too much yet unless you can afford it. I started with an evenly balanced racquet that weighed 10.5 ounces. I have gone a little bit heavier and more headlight now and know my grip size to be 4 5/8 and like the Luxilon string I use. Good luck in finding your ideal match.

Bungalo Bill
03-24-2004, 08:19 AM
I think Kevhen brought up a good point. That your game will evolve and your needs will change. Also, your knowledge of which strings you like for a particular racquet will evolve as well. I would agree not to spend too much too soon. YOu can learn good stroke mechanics with a not so expensive racquet. As you get stronger you cn begin educating yourself on the various racquets that are out there.

Zoroaster
03-24-2004, 09:53 PM
Thank you all for your replies. Sorry if this is in the wrong place then, I was just thinking that the racquets section is more for "Is xyz a good racquet?" type things. But anyway, I will definitely have to demo some racquets. Hopefully I can find some stores near me that demo.

I tried my friends ti radical and that seemed really nice(would this be considered a "players racquet"?); I had quite a bit of control with it and I liked the weight. I really liked the control factor because I beleive control is more important than power, although power can sure come in handy. Another thing, I need to get my racquet restrung which I think is an even bigger incentive to just buy a new racquet instead of fixing my old one.

I am also wondering is there a big difference between racquets that are around $100 to those that are more around $200 (eg liquid metals)?

I think Camilio & Bungalo Billl were kind of on the same track with getting a players racquet and buying one ahead of my game, which I strongly agree with. I guess I can't exactly define my game as of yet to help you all out, but generally do you think a racquet such as the ti radical would be good for a beginner to learn into?

Once again, thank you all for your time!

Brad

python
03-25-2004, 10:50 AM
Brad,

I'll respectfully disagree with Camilio.

If you play with a mixed group of players in terms of playing skill as many do, then a racquet with more pop will indeed make your outings more enjoyable. I think many of us active on this board are very experienced players, some excellent in fact, and we tend to forget that not everyone has the same goal to become a tournament playing 5.0.

Take my wife for example. She currently plays 3.0 womens singles and doubles with a Babolat Pure Drive. She has decent form herself yet in fact would not consider playing with what is termed a 'players racquet'. The Bab gives her the confidence she needs to play the fast-paced yet socially-oriented matches she sees each week.

So by all means demo and determine what type of racquet you'd be most comfortable with.

In the power racquet class, I'd suggest trying the Dunlop Super Revelation MP. For a 'tweener type stick, I recommend my own racquet: the Volkl V1 Classic. Finally, Camilio's own Prince Original Graphite Oversize is a fine example of the low power, control-oriented model typically called the players racquet.

The nice thing about the V1 Classic is that it is suitable to a wide variety of levels and styles of players. It has power, control, and it ain't to shabby at generating spin. Really a racquet you can 'grow' with, so to speak. You won't need a new racquet if and when you get better, unless you're just tired of the V1 and want something different.

python
03-25-2004, 10:56 AM
I tried my friends ti radical and that seemed really nice(would this be considered a "players racquet"?); I had quite a bit of control with it and I liked the weight. I really liked the control factor because I beleive control is more important than power, although power can sure come in handy. Another thing, I need to get my racquet restrung which I think is an even bigger incentive to just buy a new racquet instead of fixing my old one.



The Ti Radical is considered a powerful player's racquet. Many good players use or used it with a slight addition of lead tape.


I am also wondering is there a big difference between racquets that are around $100 to those that are more around $200 (eg liquid metals)?


Many racquets have their prices lowered as their product life-cycle is ending. It's just like a car - last year's models are cheaper than this year's. The Ti Radical can be bought for around $80 new right now. It was double that price when Head first introduced it.


I think Camilio & Bungalo Billl were kind of on the same track with getting a players racquet and buying one ahead of my game, which I strongly agree with. I guess I can't exactly define my game as of yet to help you all out, but generally do you think a racquet such as the ti radical would be good for a beginner to learn into?
Brad

It should be fine if that's the way you choose to go. The Ti Radical is actually a good platform to add weight to as you get better and can handle a heavier frame.