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tennis tech
01-01-2005, 05:41 PM
What is the objective of the tennis racquet industry?
More power? control? spin? racquet life?
Less vibration?
I do not think there is much where to go from here, there are plenty of options that fill any need, donīt you think?
Maybe we will end with a base model with attach-on gadgets to add weight, a substance to make it more stiff and some spray paint to personalize it.
At least it would be cheaper! (or maybe not since it would be the NEWEST thing)

BreakPoint
01-01-2005, 05:47 PM
What is the objective of the tennis racquet industry?
More power? control? spin? racquet life?
Less vibration?

It's SALES!!!! Come on, wake up, it's a business and the objective of a business is to sell products and make lots of money. As long as people are dumb enough to buy it, they don't really care what it does. :roll:

Tour90
01-01-2005, 05:55 PM
i think they've pretty much covered everything from power (babolat) to control (prince, head, wilson). As far as spin goes, it depends on the string pattern. Wilson has covered almost everything with he n-code from minimizing vibration, to longer lasting life, and the other benefits are pretty much self explanitory. I agree with BreakPoint, it's all about sales now.

battousai555
01-01-2005, 06:03 PM
It's sad but it's true, all about the money... It doesn't really seem like any of the new technology is any better than the classics. Is the N-coded tour 90 really any different from the old tour 90?

ej
01-01-2005, 06:05 PM
Gaseous Metal

goober
01-01-2005, 06:28 PM
Liquidnano technology

El Diablo
01-01-2005, 07:20 PM
It's all been done? I don't think so. The early computers were the size of a garage and now a chip can do several trillion calculations a second. Likewise with racquets, there will be advances but probably every 5 to 10 years, rather than annually as the marketing people would have you believe.

Kirko
01-01-2005, 08:20 PM
Its been done. They have hit the "wall" with material & design. If the racket companies would just admit it. If they could only swallow their prie or whatever and re introuce the frames we like again, that is the prestige, rd-7 and some others . They won't though.

BreakPoint
01-01-2005, 10:10 PM
The early computers were the size of a garage and now a chip can do several trillion calculations a second. Likewise with racquets, there will be advances but probably every 5 to 10 years, rather than annually as the marketing people would have you believe.
Yeah, maybe next they'll introduce a racquet the size of a ping pong paddle that plays like an Oversized Longbody Pure Drive. LOL. ;) :lol: They'll market it as - "All the power you could ever need in a very manuverable, arm-friendly package". LOL. :lol:

dAgEnIuS
01-01-2005, 10:11 PM
the LOOKS...

GrahamIsSuper
01-01-2005, 10:33 PM
I agree with El Diablo on this one....back in the day of wood, there were people who said "this is as good as it gets"....look where we are today!

There have been some interesting advancements in the racket era. Perhaps these few years were more experimental, you know, seeing what works the best. Maybe after a way is found, racket companies will move to create something no one has imagined.

Ryoma Kun
01-01-2005, 11:43 PM
i think they're gunna unleash some absurd new material that will make up about .05627% of the frame but will add 30% more control 30% more power and 33% more feel.
this frame will also have an odd # of mains and will include pws, tsc, braided graphite and kevlar, IPS.
They will also create these racquets in a vacuum.

El Diablo
01-02-2005, 01:13 PM
Wow, some of you guys sound like science students who worry that all the discoveries have already been made! GrahamIsSuper said it above -- most innovation is not anticipated, so asking the question "what is next" is sort of silly.

Craig Sheppard
01-02-2005, 02:06 PM
They're hasn't been a bonafide technology that's been BETTER since graphite. It makes racquets feel different, but not better. I could argue that Fischer's vacuum technology gives a unique feel, some would say better. Also, Pro Kennex's Kinetic technology was a real breakthrough, since there are so many real-world examples of it improving the comfort of a racquet.

But all this new material technology has done is make racquets lighter, stiffer, and more powerful--3 things advanced players don't need. Fortunately for the racquet companies, the majority of the market is 2.5-3.5 players who think a new racquet will improve their game (maybe it will?). We are mostly 3.5+ players on this board, and we're not the target market. It's like car magazines complaining about car companies--hey car magazine, you're not the target market for most cars. It's Mrs. Mom and Dad who go on grocery runs and take their kids to school. Same with 2.5-3.5 players (people who play for fun) and 3.5+ players (more serious, more critical about "technology").

Racquet technology is a lot like racing cars. They can make the cars lighter and lighter, and they can make racquets the same way. It allows Ferrari, et al, to redistribute the weight in the cars with ballast to the most advantagous locations. Racquet manufacturers will do the same if they're not doing it already. When you've got a protoype racquet that weighs 9 oz, you'll need to put those 3 oz somewhere to make a 12 oz player's stick.

What I'd like to know is how scientific they are about racquet construction and development. Are they actually working toward a goal, or do they throw a bunch of new materials in a mold and say "hey, maybe these will feel good!" Sometimes it seems they order up some of the latest hi-tech material from a supply company and go "let's see what we can do with this!". I am only looking at it from a customer's point of view though.

It seems like companies will find a technology and then apply it across the board, whether or not it achieves the goal of the racquet. Woofer grommets, nCode, Liquid Metal--maybe they are better for more powerful sticks, but less so for higher end player's frames.

Craig